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Peak 1 400 10/79

Discussion in 'Coleman No:400' started by Rick b, Jan 9, 2013.

  1. Rick b

    Rick b United States Subscriber

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    1357690250-01_07_13_020_opt.jpg

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  2. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy Subscriber

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    Nice 400, Rick. These are a little finicky to start up and can flood real easy if you don't know what you are doing, but once you figure it out, they run beautifully, like you have obviously done. The extra flame control on the other side of the stove makes these really great.

    What I've figured out for lighting these is:
    1. Close the simmer control.
    2. Pump the stove up about 20 to 30 pumps.
    3. Open the main valve all the way. On mine, the simmer control keeps the fuel from flowing at all. I guess this is a way that you can tell if your cleaning needle is either worn or not working.
    4. Get your match, lighter or igniter ready.
    5. Open the simmer control slowly and light the stove.
    6. Let it burn at low levels to get the generator hot.
    7. Slowly open the simmer until it can handle higher output.
    8. Pump 20 or 30 times more.

    If it turns into a yellow flame from too much fuel on start up, I have found that if I close off the simmer control and let it finish burning excess fuel and start the steps over, eventually it will get to a perfect band of blue.

    I've flooded these things so many times following the instructions on the label that I had to do this the above way. Your results will vary.

    I've read other posts on lighting these stoves different ways, but ultimately it comes down to controlling flooding the burner and/or the mixing chamber. Good pressure in the tank also produces a better fuel-air mixture, so it's important to pump up the stove. If you get fuel coming out of the mixing chamber and it's gushing down the side of the tank, then you have to stop, clean up the mess and wait for it to dry. Otherwise, you'll end up with a fireball (like I did) and having to use the metal bucket method to put it out. It is quite scary to have the whole thing in flames and not be able to get to the controls to shut it off. Gloves and the bucket made a world of difference.


    Have a great day,
    sam
     
  3. Rick b

    Rick b United States Subscriber

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    Hi Sam. It was fiddley to start. It didnt flood but I think was close to doing so. Thanks for taking the time to express your experience and lighting precedure for these stoves, I know it will be very helpful in the future. Thanks again.

    All the best,