Phoebus 625 stove

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by smarti, Aug 5, 2012.

  1. smarti

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    Hi,

    I am brand new here. I am a member of another forum related to pressurized gas appliances. I found this stove this morning and someone suggested that I post it here, so here I am. This came with all of the original paperwork, including the sales receipt from March 31, 1973 ($17.50). The price sticker is still on the box. I was very happy to find it in such complete, well taken care of condition. Did I do go?

    Thanks.

    Scott

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  2. Wim

    Wim Subscriber

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    Hi Smarti, welcome on board!
    Your Phoebus looks like it has not seen much use, and the Phoebus brand is known for its good quality. So you have many years of splendid stove-fun ahead of you! Some will say the 625 is a tad heavy for backpacking (little girls :roll: ;) :lol: ) but yes, very nice score!

    Best regards,

    Wim
     
  3. smarti

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    Well, this thread has certainly gotten a lot of looks, but only one response. I am not sure what to think of that? Perhaps you all thought, because I am a new member, that I was simply here to get your reaction so I could get ready to resell the item on ePay? I assure you, that is not the case. I am a collector, restorer, and user of primarily Coleman lanterns, but will add unique items like this to my collection when I find them. I was just curious about the completeness of this package (is it hard to find with the box, paperwork, etc...?) and the quality of the stove itself. I really would appreciate more input from you all, if you have it to offer?

    Thanks.

    Scott
     
  4. RonPH

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    Hi Smarti, dont worry about the response really. OK so now you have 2 responses :lol:

    Have one of those but marketed by Phoenix. Great stoves that require lots of TLC.

    Ron
     
  5. smarti

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    Thanks. I feel better now.
     
  6. bajabum

    bajabum R.I.P.

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    I have one, drove 75 miles to get it, paid $50...
    Came with the big can, and some small bits in a wee tin, no box...

    I think you did very well!
     
  7. woodsy97845

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    Smarti,

    I have looked a few times, but as I am new here, I don't have any input. I don't even know what the stove is. :?

    I look and if I don't have anything that adds, there's no reason for me to respond.

    Now you have a few responses. :D
     
  8. Matukat

    Matukat Subscriber

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    Depending on the damage to your wallet, I suspect you did very well! :-) :thumbup: :thumbup:
    I recently saw one on a lesser known auction site and it was up to 60 some odd dollars. Unless it were a "target" for my collection, I won't go that high. I paid 70 something on the same site for my Taykit, with box, instructions, original receipt, heat diffuser, plug, and a letter to the original owner about the stove. It was a must have for me, so I was happy. Part of it is always what it's worth to you. ;)
     
  9. hobowonkanobe

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    8) shhh! I'm plotting! :lol: :lol: :lol: I found one of those bout 8 years ago in almost as good a knick as that, for $20. Got conned out of it and have been lamenting it ever since.
    Beautiful find, and one heluva entry to our twisted / humble ranks.
     
  10. Nordicthug

    Nordicthug R.I.P.

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    The 625 never attained much popularity as a trail stove in the US due to it's percieved complexity and it's actual size. There were many, many other stoves with a lot fewer knobs 'n levers for less money.

    Also Coleman pretty much had the car camping stove market almost to themselves. Even now the words "Coleman Stove" refer to nearly every camp stove in the country whether it's a Coleman product or made by Kamp-Kook, Prentice-Waybers or anyone else. I have a 625 in the round tin with all the extra bits. I found it on e-prey because at the time I was prodding around with nothing useful to do and was searching what I thought were funny categories. The seller had some weird wording in his title and I was the only bidder. I paid around $20 with shipping if I remember. It took me several days to learn how to light it.

    I figured that since the Wehrmacht had issued 'em since before dirt formed and some mouth breathing Kraut shovel monkey from a three hut village in the sticks could be taught to use one without anihilating his squad, so could I. I was right. That time.

    Anyway, welcome to this nest of ne'er do wells and crazies. You seem to be the deranged sort who'll fit right in. If you're not half nuts, you will be soon. Stove pox is extremely contagious, and has no known cure, only symptom management and that not all that effective.

    Fortunatly Stove Pox is much cheaper to treat than Old Car, Fishing, or Shotgun Pox as excellent and unusual sammples are to be had for less than the average mortgage payment or weekly grocery bill.

    Kids and wives don't need to eat every day anyway, if Dad needs a Stove Pox Treatment, now do they? One could always apply for Government Assistance, lots of dirt bag layabouts get it with no disabilites save terminal laziness, why not an honest stovepoxic?

    Gerry
     
  11. bajabum

    bajabum R.I.P.

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    Phoebus 625/725 were use heavily by the Boy Scouts (much after my time, we used brush (wood))
    Simple, very rugged and heavy..
    I believe I noted we used wood... Stone age Scouts, we were! :lol:
    Did I mention HEAVY? :-({|=

    You could pass this'n down to your Grand-brats, easy!
     
  12. Nordicthug

    Nordicthug R.I.P.

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    When I was in Scouts our campstoves were tuna cans filled with cardboard and wax. Otherwise known as "Buddy Burners" why 'buddy burner?" no clue. Tuna cans also fit sterno stoves perfectly. We also learned early on to carry candle wax cast into little bars to refuel the B Burners as they depleted the fuel. Lighter than cans.

    Our main heat source for cooking was good ol' wood. I made a knock down buck saw from some oak planks that began life as a pallet. Turned 'em into a wood shop project, then used the prototype to make about ten. Sold em for $5 each. wood: free Sawblades 45c each total cost about 4.75 with tax, total profit $44.25. Yay me. A greedy Capitalist even as a yoot.

    With those saws, Troop 175 could denude half an acre in just a few short weeks. Or gather and prepare enough dry wood to last half an hour in only twenty five or thirty minutes. Toss two or three good sharp hatchets into the mix, and you could make a sure bet on at least one idiot Scout maiming himself. As often as not it was me.

    I still prefer to cook over a fire than on a stove. My trail stoves were always a backup except when camping on snow. Or later with some cute lil' cuddle bunny who wanted hot edible food in less than three hours. Several cute girls leared to hate hiking and camping due to me. One loved it so I married her.

    Gerry
     
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  13. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    "When I was in Scouts our campstoves were tuna cans filled with cardboard and wax. Otherwise known as "Buddy Burners""
    Over here these were called hobo stoves and were usually used with a large tin cut to make the pot stand.
    We did them for show more than real use but they did cook well even if a little smoky
     
  14. hobowonkanobe

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    yup, I learned how to make and use those at a summer camp when I was 12. we also used a large coffee can vented on the solid side ( the bottom of the can which was used as a hot plate) and a 4x4" door on the other so as to place/remove the burner.

    taught a buddy wg
    ho was frshly homeless and hopelessly broke how to make one so he cld cook for himself, and he made an interesting discovery; DONT.USE.BEESWAX! buddy burner does a rather impressive reenactment of MT. St. Hellens. Woof!
     
  15. weasel

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    Welcome smarti and welcome to stovie land. Before you ask, yes, I am the one and same guy on that "other" site.