Please help me with Coleman 533 stove

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by kmmmfs, Dec 11, 2017.

  1. kmmmfs

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    the stove is great but I have issues with the burner, I cannot seem to be able to simmer the flame and if I try it only simmers a little bit but not what I’m looking for. I don’t seem to be the only person who is having this issue because also my friend is having the same problem. If you have any ideas or accessories i can add to the stove to fix this issue please help me out.
     
  2. teckguy_58

    teckguy_58 United States Subscriber

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    @kmmmfs

    If all you can get out of the burner is a simmer then the generator may be mostly plugged.
    These stoves are a dual fuel so one can burn both Coleman types of fuels and unleaded auto fuel.
    Unleaded fuel here in the US has lots and lots of additives which will plug up the generator.
    You can find the generator for your stove on ebay.
    You can also find Coleman replacement parts at old coleman parts. Here is the link for your generator.

    http://www.oldcolemanparts.com/product.php?productid=498&cat=33&page=2

    If this takes care of the problem then I have a recommendation for you and that is don't use auto fuel instead use only Coleman fuel and if you don't like the price well at Walmart they also sell Crown camping fuel which is much cheaper and also works very well.

    Also another thought is to check the pump out to make sure it is working properly. Here is the link for pump replacement parts.

    http://www.oldcolemanparts.com/product.php?productid=88&cat=23&page=1

    There could also be a problem with the pickup tube. The schrader valve may have gone bad. Most will just replace the hole valve assembly because it is much easier. Here is the link.

    https://www.oldcolemanparts.com/product.php?productid=388

    I hope this information helps.

    Cheers,
    Norman
     
  3. HunterStovie

    HunterStovie United States Subscriber

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    @kmmmfs ,

    So what you are saying is that on low the flame is still too high to simmer. You could try reducing the number of pumps. If there were a kerosene generator available that would reduce the output, but I've never seen one for that stove. I no longer have any of my 533's to play with so I couldn't even test a few theories I have.

    Mike
     
  4. kmmmfs

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    Thank you to everyone who responded but my stove it has no issues other than this and I actually have two and they both do this. The flame stays the same even if I put it on simmer. I saw one product that’s made of metal I believe that is put on the flame and reduces the heat but I’m not sure of the name. Do you know where I can find it? Or what is the name of it? Thank you I appreciate your help.
     
  5. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    General consensus a while ago was a new generator will fix this. Generators are hard to get now. I have a 533 and 422 both have this fault.
     
  6. phaedrus42

    phaedrus42 Subscriber

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    I've seen with my 533 and 550 stoves that the simmer setting works much better with a lower pressure in the fount. Doubtless a semi-blocked generator will aggravate the problem.
     
  7. BillyBear

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    Try reducing the pumps and use less pressure. My 508 has a similar problem if I try to max the pressure in the fount.
     
  8. itchy

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    That style of generator, with just the one lever to control output is hit and miss, with regard to regulation. A new one may work better, but you may end up dropping big bucks for one that works no better that the one you have. I agree that the dual-fuel moniker has shortened the useful lifetime of many of these stoves.
     
  9. Danskeren

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    I got limited experience with a 442, and what I´ve found is that if you turn it to the point where you nealy turn it off, and then a bit up again (with not too much pressure added) it is easier to regulate the flame to a reasonable simmer, than if you try to do it direct from full to low.

    Mads
     
  10. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    Best I get is a reasonable simmer that drops till almost out If you dont increase the power it does go out. If you increase it it does the same thing again and again etc
     
  11. HunterStovie

    HunterStovie United States Subscriber

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    @kmmmfs ,

    Just a thought. Being familiar and having used all of the Coleman one burners, one that surprised me the most with its ability in flame control was the 440. It was even better than my 400B and 508A. If you are willing to give it a try, Old Coleman parts still has 2 440 specific generators which I had sold to him when I got rid of my excess stoves. Your second option would be a 400B/508A generator. I would try either one of these before getting a 442 or 533 generator to try out. Let me know how things turn out. I would try it myself but I donated all of my 533's a few years ago.

    Mike
     
  12. ItsInBits United Kingdom

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    @kmmmfs

    The 533 is pretty good at simmering. Mine ran on unleaded fuel* so I cleaned the generator regularly (every 2 or 3 tanks of fuel) with some carb cleaner, and I keep the tank pressure high when cooking because I don't like having to repressurise while the stove's in use. Reducing tank pressure might help but I think the key to a good simmer is keeping the fuel vapourised and for this, the generator does need to be in good shape and sitting in or close to the flame - there is only so low you can turn a stove before it stops making enough heat to keep itself running.

    I never start it on simmer; I always boil then turn down which means the generator has got hot to start with. If you're wanting to go straight to simmer, that's difficult, but if you are getting it hot first and then it won't turn down to a good simmer (careful with the lever, it's sensitive right around the vertical) then I agree with @geeves and the "general consensus" - your generator needs to be replaced.



    * I switched to Coleman Fuel this year, which is eye-wateringly expensive. In 12 years I've had no problems with unleaded but this stove definitely burns nicer on Coleman.
     
  13. attb2

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    I bought my own Coleman 533. :-)
    Is there any option to un-pressurise the tank when the stove is running?
    Or I have to shut it off, wait a little, open the tank filler cap, un-pressurise, then pump less and start it again?
     
  14. ItsInBits United Kingdom

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    No.

    You can do that with keros stoves because, in the words of one member here, kero doesn't go BOOM.
    Coleman fuel goes BOOM. As does gasoline. So, you don't want to be letting off the pressure when there's a flame around.

    With a clean generator, it will simmer nicely. You need a delicate touch on the lever but it can settle down to a really low flame once it's warm.
     
  15. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    Im probably going to get a heated response but the 4 coleman stoves I own are all sitting on the shelf fully pressurized. I could pick up any one of them turn the lever and throw in a match and they would start. I havnt used one of them for more than a year. Why depressurize except to add fuel?
     
  16. phaedrus42

    phaedrus42 Subscriber

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    Two reasons immediately come to mind, but there are probably more:
    1) If something were to go wrong, like a schrader valve failing, a fount rusting through or the stove falling and rupturing something, you would have a potentially dangerous and comparatively large fuel spill.
    2) If the fuel cap seal is under constant compression, its life is significantly shortened and it may fail when you most need it to work.

    I'm sure many of us are sometimes guilty of this, but it should at least be pointed out that it is not the safest way to treat your stoves and lamps.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2019
  17. ArchMc

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    There's also the potential issue of small children (or adults with minds of same) idly turning a valve.

    ....Arch
     
  18. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    Call me a simple man, but I cannot get my head around the idea of putting stoves away deliberately under full pressurization.

    What is the explanation for the practice-- i.e. why is it a better practice than simply relieving pressure before storage?

    Is the idea that months or years later, one can avoid a few strokes of the pump, thus increasing convenience?
     
  19. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    laziness certainly plays a part.