Pocket Butane Stove

Discussion in 'Japan' started by RonPH, Jan 1, 2010.

  1. RonPH

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    Here is a pocket butane stove (it really is pocketable) except for the canister of course which I have had for quite some time now. Yes, using the Asian butane canister is much more economical in the long run. However, the connector to the butane canister is made of plastic which just snaps on to the collar of the canister and the control seats between the hose and connector rotating it left or right turns it on and off. I had from the very start experiences some flare ups as the plastic control knob is flimsy not to mention difficult to remove from the canister which requires either a screw driver or knife to pry it out.

    1262325578-PBS006.jpg

    So I decided to switch to a slightly better control knob but did require me to use the screw on type gas canisters currently being sold in sports shops. First thing I did was to find the cheapest adapter and plus2city had one for like $5 with free shipping. It took time to arrive 3 weeks to be exact but it arrived. I thought it out and I would use the original hose that is attached to the burner of the pocket stove. That was a good decision and for those intending to buy accessories for the SX9 stove, I would like to point out that although the outer sheathing is of braided ss wire, the rubber hose inside it is only as thick as a plastic straw. Yes, only that thick so beware when the hose is kinked or punctured or even slightly heated - you were forwarned! The hose attached to my burner had a thickness of 1MM and since it was longer than the hose of the SX9, I began cutting up the crimp closest to the control knob with a dremel cutting tool.

    1262326065-PBS001.jpg

    I then cut off the plastic butane adaptor on the hose and inserted the new control knob into it. It would seem that I did not have a hose clamp at that time but I remembered I had a spare spring clamp used for the fuel line which was slightly larger in diameter. So I had to bring out an old bicycle interior and cut a strip to make the diameter thicker to where the spring clamp is to be attached. This is a temporary fix, as soon as the hose clamp arrives, I will replace it though it works fairly well and secure. Here is how it looks:

    1262326348-PBS002.jpg

    A slight tug on the hose to check that it wont slip out, I then assembled the stove and connected a canister to the adapter, fired her up, and made me some hot water.

    1262326473-PBS004.jpg

    What is nice about this stove is that the pot holder will accept and support large pots up to 12 inches without a problem as long as you have a flat surface for the stove to sit on.

    1262326574-PBS005.jpg

    After heating up some water, I cooled the stove down and then put it back in its original 6.5" x 4.5" plastic bag which is about 1.5" thick when the parts are disassembled.

    1262326829-PBS007.jpg

    This is not my MAIN stove but a back up and with a small Giga Canister, it does not take up too much weight or space in my backpack.

    I would like to know with some CCS members if they have experienced "flare ups" when positioning or moving the canister.


    HAPPY NEW YEAR and thanks for reading.

    PS. I put this in the Japan stoves as this one is Made in Japan though marketed years ago in North America.

    Ron
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  2. itchy

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    Ron, I am guessing that the occational flaring may occur when a bit of liquid fuel, rather than the gas, gets in the line. At least that is what I attributed it to when I observed the same.
     
  3. RonPH

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    Itchy, that confirms my suspicion that when the tank is sloshed around, its the liquid fuel that come up and not really flares but rather gets it in high setting before settling to what you,ve set.

    Ron
     
  4. hikin_jim

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    Hi, Ron,

    Nice gassie fettle!

    I've experienced the same thing with a stove I was running on an "Asian" butane can. When I moved the stove, it flared up. I'm pretty sure it's just a spot of liquid butane getting into the feed tube.

    How do you like that particular stove? I have one that is very similar. I notice on mine and I think yours that the pot sits very close to the burner. Does your stove heat well? I'm thinking the pot should sit a little higher off the burner for efficient heating.

    HJ
     
  5. idahostoveguy

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    Hi Ron,

    Nice little stove. It looks like there's hardly anything to it, making it quite compact, especially since it tears down to individual components like it does.

    Thanks for sharing,
    sam
     
  6. RonPH

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    Hi HJ, the distance between the burner head and the pot is about .75 inch and once the kettle base is on the pot rest, the flames hug it well thereby distributing the heat evenly.

    Sam, yup pretty much a compact stove. I may have to find me some old good canvas and sew me a nice pouch which would also accomodate the small gassie canister. A visit to the surplus store for the materials and snap when I get the time. Might even put a nice belt loop on it. Will post pictures when its made to make you drool.

    Ron
     
  7. hikerduane

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    I bought one similar to this one at a drug store years ago for around $7.98. Meant to use it when it got too windy on my backpacking trips for a campfire. I have only used it a couple times. On cold mornings, you have to warm up the butane to get a flame. As you hold your hands around the can, the stove slowly burns hotter making more noise. That's neat how you rigged it up to a real canister.