Possible next generation of classic stoves

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by Mark Layman, Mar 8, 2019.

  1. Mark Layman

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    Just wondering / pondering. Opinions should be shared and also discussed. All have a favorite based on design worthiness and also usefulness. The oldies are indeed goodies and most share the same likeability due to robust materials, precision manufacturing and also engineering prowess based on intended functionality. Some like light weight and demand such. Some favor output and multi fuel use at altitude. What may be your best of the breed Per say and why. Maybe a best of all breeds stove that will transcend into the future so stoves can enjoy the technological days to come. A recent post by @OMC regarding the Coleman peak one 400 comes to mind. I like the original 508 too. What say ye!
     
  2. OMC

    OMC Subscriber

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    happy Friday.

    ...Possible next generation of classics...
    What may be my best of the breed Per say and why.

    Not sure I follow.
    Glad you mentioned the 508 (not 508A), thank you.
    The 400 & 508 are already classics, right?
    (vs what is next generation?).

    Or you already have my vote, 400. FWIW 400, 502 & 508 are in a 3-way tie with me, a tie I can't seem to break.
    502 is not nearly as hot as the others, for a big boil I may opt for hotter burner. Otherwise she's good... Ya dance w/the one that brung ya. A 502 user since 1972. The model has done nothing to lose favor. If I want for a base camp 2 burner , that be 502 and a 508, bingo!

    My curse of late is my attraction to sexy
    discus stoves of course ;) and favor stoves older, then older.

    now if you'll excuse me a sexy young thing has my attention, i'll catch up later.
    thx omc out
     
  3. HunterStovie

    HunterStovie United States Subscriber

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    How about a stove design made after 2000 but not before, and is possibly still around?

    Maybe the MSR XGK-Ex in 2005. With it's family history, does that already make it a modern classic?

    Or the Dragonfly in 1998, both purpose built and still around.

    Mike
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2019
  4. HunterStovie

    HunterStovie United States Subscriber

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    I wanted to add the Omni-Fuel and Optimus Nova which are contemporaries to the above stoves like the old brassies were to themselves.

    I would have added these earlier but my wife wanted to use the computer.

    Mike
     
  5. DAVE GIBSON

    DAVE GIBSON Subscriber

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    I would say let the classic's be the classic's as we here at
    ccs know them.newer coleman type one burners from the 50's thru 60's or so
    become known as vintage along with the really old two burners.
    the more modern stoves like the msr stoves with a long history of
    small changes can fall into there own category as "works in progress" or something like that.Gaz stoves with the huge ball shaped,and others,tanks
    can be put into a extinct category.
     
  6. Twoberth

    Twoberth United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Pocket rocket in red triangular tube.
     
  7. back view Russian Federation

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    High altitude, pocket size, high enough combustion power。。。
    If driving a car, use QLY-1.5

    TB2w9kHdmtYBeNjSspaXXaOOFXa_!!2978961661.jpg

    Crazy Improvement of OPTIMUS 199 = 8000W
    QLY-1.5 = 11000W
    Natural Gas for Household Use = 4500W
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2019
  8. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    My suggestion is a Biolite as a way to utilise found materials (dry twigs) as fuel, burning cleanly thanks to the in-built fan. A brave attempt in the 1st generation to provide power for charging a phone, accomplished in the 2nd generation.

    It took the already-established feature of a battery-powered fan-assisted wood-gas stove and refined it by incorporating a charging source (a thermo-electric generator) for the on-board battery to make the whole thing self-contained. The 2nd generation was a useful refinement to fulfil properly the original brief as a charging source for a smart phone, itself an iconic feature of our modern age.

    Go-anywhere (weight/bulk aside) independent of fossil fuels in an age where conservation of such is a prominent issue for debate.
     
  9. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Quote above not included.
    Biolite:
    Unless a better suggestion comes along, a good suggestion.
    Weight and bulk are the issues to be solved in V3. :)

    Ken in NC
     
  10. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    I agree, Biolite and TEGstove may turn into modern classics. The first revolutionary stoves to come along in a long time, instead of just evolutionary minor tweaks to an old design.

    I would possibly add the plethora of modern kerosene pressure stoves made for third world markets. Not up to Primus/Optimus/Radius/Monitor etc quality, but indeed a functional stove for very very little money compared to the classics back in the day. Hugely more available to third world poor people, saving them from cooking over wood fires, filling their houses with smoke, suffering smoke inhalation dangers and subjecting their children to same.
     
  11. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr SotM Winner Subscriber

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    There are a lot of biomass designs that can be made on location from available materials to burn the local biomass excess. The Rocket Stove design is promising. Gasification also.
     
  12. Mark Layman

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  13. Mark Layman

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    And also yes
     
  14. Mark Layman

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    @OMC i have examples of all three stoves mentioned. All great stoves for sure.
    I was thinking more along the lines of modern current manufacture stoves as a starting point.
    I am thinking MSR, (xgk-ex / dragonfly), Optimus Nova and optifuel, and Primus omnifuels and omnilites. Modern offerings as an example.
    If you think about it the designs cant really get much better. CFV technology comes to mind and may push these more modern stoves to the realm of outdated very quickly. They will not however go by the wayside from use as they are as good as the oldies for long term life IMHO.
    @snwcmpr and others make a very good point regarding biomass stoves. They are getting better and honestly out and about one can always find something that will burn.
     
  15. Murph

    Murph United States Subscriber

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    @Mark Layman , the problem with those stoves is will they survive intact? I can see years from now, some one going through a estate and finding bits and tits, less a fuel line or a cracked plastic pump and saying, "Eff all bother!" and off to the wheelie bin, of scrap bin, never to be seen again.

    @OMC hit it spot on, IMO, with his mention of the old Coleman classics, 500,502, 400 and 508, not to forget their "suitcase" stoves, they work reliably, with little or no plastic crap to break, and sustainable with ordinary care, and intact. Oddly enough, we have the Amish communities to thank for some of this, they make the use and repair of these to a near art form, as shown by their blend of fuel referred to as "Amish Blend", a mix of VM&P naptha and kerosene in varying proportions, along with attachments to their own stoves, marketing them as well.

    Murph
     
  16. Mark Layman

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    You may be right @Murph but just as some old stoves survive because of folks like us not all will go by the wayside. We will but not the stoves.
     
  17. Harder D. Soerensen

    Harder D. Soerensen Denmark Subscriber

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    Have just gotten an MSR Whisperlite
    Very well build in a special design which is often copied.

    Maybe the SIGG Tourist and Baby Enders 9063 as well?
     
  18. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    The next generation of classic stoves would be by definition the current collection of new stoves. Think Primus Eta Msr reactor etc. Not classics today but in 10 years they will be. Its the generation after that which will get interesting. Supply of liquid and gas fuel plus advances in battery technology could well result i viable battery powered stoves becoming the popular choice within 10 years and these will be the classics of 30 years time. I doubt I will be collecting by then
     
  19. anlrolfe

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    Solo stove-
    No moving parts or thermo electrical components to break. If you need power, go solar charger.

    IMO, for the money, this is one of the best little remote canister stoves that can be had. There are many that have more power. Power is often wasted. Get a better pot and wind screen and you can do more with less and conserve fuel.

    20190310_070928.jpg

    20190310_071258.jpg

    20190310_071430.jpg


    What's in my day pack? Trangia 28, or my Rucksack, SVEA 123R or Primus 71 w/ Eidelweis cook set.
     
  20. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Valid point. I am thinking of the future.
    The Biolite must be made much more efficient to compete with a Solo or Bush Buddy and a solar charger.