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Pragus No.1

Discussion in 'Other Brands' started by presscall, May 15, 2013.

  1. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I must have started a tradition now. With my birthday coming up my daughter offered to buy me a stove if I selected it.

    I went for this, an Austrian Pragus No.1 on ebay from a seller in Bulgaria

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    I'm pretty sure it's an early example of the marque and has what I can only describe as that 'stove on stilts' look of an older classic, contrasted here with a Monitor Regal, which is much closer to the ground

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    The pump is nearer vertical than horizontal, which made it large bore and short stroke. Again, contrasted with the Monitor Regal

    1368653401-7.JPG 1368653410-8.JPG 1368653419-9.JPG


    I'll have to replace the pump shaft, which is very corroded

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    The knurling on the pump lid and pump knob is very pleasing, with knurling and the curved contours of the winding knob of a pocketwatch

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    I anticipated a challenge removing the non-return valve, which isn't a standard form (well, Vapalux-ish maybe) with a slotted panhead form

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    I left it to soak in releasing oil while I commandeered a 19mm flat bit from a drill set that I'd picked up in the 'reduced price' bin at an Aldi store for a couple of pounds earlier in the evening. I took it to the grinding wheel to make it fit (closely) the slot in the non-return valve head

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    End result was this contraption ...

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    ... which worked very well

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    The valve hadn't been removed in a very long time and the cork pip was well overdue for replacement

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    NEXT - The filler cap and air valve arrangement and something about the burner

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  2. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Not your usual arrangement for the filler cap and air valve. It's a 'male' threaded item for one thing

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    That air valve looks like an old bodge to me. It doesn't match the quality of the other components, but judging by the wear profile, it's been mated up with that filler cap for a long time.


    The burner's a disappointment and surely isn't original to the stove. It's poorly made and I'd judge it's a product of the 1950's or '60's

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    I've a burner from a Graetzea ( Graetzia in Stove Ref Gallery ) that gets little use because of stress cracks in the stove's fuel tank - which hasn't actually leaked fuel when pressurised, but not something I fire up very often.

    It's from a German stove, so not too inappropriate to align with this Austrian oldie I feel

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    I've more work to do - replacing seals and the pump rod + pump cup (Coleman sized I reckon) - then I'll post some photos of the stove fired up.

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  3. Ray123

    Ray123 United States Subscriber

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    Hi John

    Interesting stove you have here. I noticed the P-S emblem (Prague-Smichov) and recognized it as the emblem very similar to what Meva used. Meva also used the slotted head valve design.

    Here's an interesting company history Ross posted:

    https://classiccampstoves.com/threads/10295

    Ray
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  4. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark United States Subscriber

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    Morning, Presscall,

    John, if you need some Coleman stuff, including some leather pump cups, please let me know. My Dear Brother Sefa sent me some outstanding Coleman pump cups a while back, and I would happily send you a few of them, and any other Coleman parts that you may need for this project. GREAT old stove, too, and not one you would see to often! Well found, and well done, John!! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  5. mr optimus

    mr optimus United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi John, a very interesting and unusual stove with some nice unique features.
    I have never seen a stove with the pump in that position before, mounted on the top of the tank at about 45 degrees.
    A really good choice of stove for your coming Birthday John, and a really good resourceful idea converting a cheap or blunt spade bit into a wide slotted driver for the NRV
     
  6. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark United States Subscriber

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    Hey, John,

    As today is your special day, HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU, MATE!!! I think it's grand for your daughter to buy you such a fun present at this old stove! Sweet Bride and I wish you a fine day, and many, many more to come!! Thanks for sharing your present with us all! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Mark
     
  7. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Very kind, Ray, Doc and Brian. Typically generous of you too, Doc, to offer to sort me out with a Coleman pump leather.

    In point of fact though, I keep a good stock of Sefa's pump washers myself and it turns out that a Coleman pump cup wasn't big enough for the bore of the Pragus pump ... but to the tale.

    To recap, the steel pump rod was well gone

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    I decided to use brass for a replacement, threaded to fit the pump knob and to take a 4mm brass nut and lock-nut to secure the pump cup

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    I tried a Coleman-sized pump cup initially, but it was too sloppy a fit in the pump tube

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    I was glad that when I last put an order in for washers to CCS member Sefaudi, I asked him to include a spare for my Tilley FL6 floodlight

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    It was a little oversized for the Pragus pump tube but not by much and when oiled - and thanks to the suppleness of the leather that Sefa uses to make pump cup washers - it soon eased in to becoming a good fit.

    Non-return valve 'pip' seal replaced and a replacement seal for the tank filler cap made, then fuelled up, primed and pumped up and the Pragus roared into life

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    A celebratory birthday brew up!

    1368740805-32.JPG

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  8. davidcolter

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    Happy birthday and good work!
     
  9. ulysses

    ulysses United States Subscriber

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    Happy Birthday! Nice stove.

    Paul
     
  10. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark United States Subscriber

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    Hi, John.

    Lovely stove, and a brilliant fettle, my friend!! What a nice way to have a birthday brew, than on such an old, and enjoyable gift stove!! :thumbup: :clap: :clap: :D Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Mark
     
  11. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hey thanks for your best wishes all! Very kind of you indeed.

    I had a grand birthday even though I was in work and my daughter's home for the weekend so a great weekend ahead too. Too bad our son can't get over from Tokyo but it's our turn to visit him again this year.

    Jen topped up the present of the Pragus with a 'surprise' gift which was a book published by the British Museum to accompany their 'Life and death in Pompeii and Herculaneum' exhibition. It runs until September so we'll definitely be visiting our daughter in London and taking a look at the exhibition too. Probably need more than a day I'm thinking.

    The Pragus will be my main user stove at Newark, I've decided, so there'll be some more 'action' photos to add to this topic in due course.

    The stove's as tough as old boots and the fuel capacity's generous and saves having to refill too often.

    John