PRE 1963 OPTIMUS 100

Discussion in 'Optimus No:100' started by kaw550red, Dec 18, 2009.

  1. kaw550red

    kaw550red RIP

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    In 1962 Optimus obtained the Primus brand name for liquid fuelled stoves and changed the markings on its stoves as well as creating the Primus Trading Company.

    This stove has the pre PTC markings on it so was definitely made no later than 1962. The tank is marked UPPLANDS VASBY and I think that marking started round about 1930 so the stove was made at some time between about 1930 and 1962.

    It was fitted with Optimus burner plate and two piece Optimus silent damper

    1261160055-Opt_100_ass_opt.jpg

    1261160075-100_Roarer_opt.jpg |imgRemoved|'thumb' 1261160101-Opt_100_burner_parts_opt.jpg 1261160112-Opt_100_pack_opt.jpg

    It was prepared for use by me so has the spanner, prickers and tin opener tied together. This makes them difficult to lose but if you do you are in trouble!

    I also used fluorescent storage bags so that they were difficult to lose. The bags were marked with the stove model so I did not end up miles from home with the fittings from the wrong tank.

    Regards Bryan
     
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  2. hikin_jim

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    A very practical idea, Bryan, to a) secure things together and to b) put them in a highly visible and marked stuff sack.

    I one time got out into the field:
    Stove? Check.
    Windscreen? Check.
    Fuel? Check.
    Pump? Pump!!?
    :rage: :doh: I've left the pump at home! Fortunately I was only out for the day and managed to cook with priming alcohol, :lol: but your stuff sack and tie idea is clearly a better way.

    By the way, even if I don't comment on your every post, I really appreciate the wealth of knowledge, practical experience, and photographs you so regularly share.

    HJ
     
  3. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner Admin Subscriber

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    I second that. Some times the best things are found in the quietest corners.
     
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  4. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator, R.I.P. Subscriber

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    And I'll second that! :D
     
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  5. kaw550red

    kaw550red RIP

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    Hi All

    The tricks were learned from silly experiences.

    I used to cycle and pedestrian camp and I was short of space in my saddle bag and rucksack. I never carried a stove tin because that took too much space. Stove parts would tuck into little corners whereas a tin took space. Unfortunately small parts are easily dropped and lost.

    Until recently I had forgotten about the 96 parts that I must have lost whilst using the stove when camping. I lost at least a windshield and a leg so had to improvise. A tent peg stuck into the ground was used as a temporary leg but I cannot remember how I coped without a windshield but I probably shut the tent doors and cooked inside. That convinced me to carry the parts together as big is harder to lose than small.

    There was no dehydrated food in those days. You carried tins or fresh food. On one occasion I arrived at a campsite around midnight. I was wet, cold and hungry and I had left my tin opener at home. Other campers would not have appreciated me waking them up to borrow a tin opener so I sat glaring at a tin of soup wondering how to get into it. I was on my bike and had a screwdriver so I put the blade on the tin top and bashed a hole in it. Then I got my camp knife into the hole and enlarged it.

    Loose prickers have the annoying habit of creeping under sleeping bags or airbeds and are difficult to find in the dark.

    Collectors now seem to assume that stove parts were readily available in those days. Prickers were easy to buy but not much else. I had been using a Primus 54 for 12 years before I discovered a "plug" that would seal the middle hole. I found it in a scrap box in a camping shop. It looked as though it would fit so I bought it on spec. The shop assistant did not even know what it was so we had to agree a price. When I got home and found that it fit the stove I ran round like a dog with two tails. I was thrilled to bits. I only got the reserve lid and an S hook on it. I knew nothing about chaining the reserve lid to the airscrew

    I was damned if I was going to lose something that had taken 12 years to find so tied a string to it, a tin opener, two or three prickers and a home made spanner because I had never seen a stove spanner that fit a 54. The spanner was adapted from a Norton motorcycle spanner.

    So some of my easily lost parts became a daisy chain

    I am not certain what I put my stove parts in initially but when fluorescent materials became available I made storage bags for the stove parts to try and make them conspicuous if the bag was dropped into long grass. A dull bag might have got overlooked and lost.

    I really dropped some right clangers over the years when I was camping

    Regards Bryan
     
  6. hikin_jim

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    Henry Ford, the industrialist, had an executive in his employ who made an error in judgment that cost the company $100,000. In Ford's day $100,000 might be more like $10,000,000 today. When asked by a reporter if he were going to fire the man, Ford replied something to the effect, "what? Fire him? Not after I just spent $100,000 training him!"

    I see that you, Bryan, are well trained. :)

    I am reminded of the time my father and I went backpacking in the Sierra Nevada some years ago. We spread out our evening's camp, enjoyed our repast, and retired for the night. In the morning we awoke to half a foot of out-of-season snow. We had put away none of our gear the night before. A few "neon" stuff sacks would have been just the ticket that day! We lost several items including some of our food and some of our utensils.

    Fortunately, we met a party who, unprepared for weather, had panicked and abandoned some of their gear and food at their last night's camp site in their haste to exit the high country. They described the location of the camp. We were able to find their camp, retrieve their abandoned gear, and complete our week's trip. We would have been hard pressed to complete our trip without their food and gear which included several tins of most excellent corned beef.

    HJ
     
  7. kaw550red

    kaw550red RIP

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    Hi All

    Nearly all of my knowledge was hard won so is more difficult to forget. Unfortunately I can usually remember what is of little interest to me but cannot remember the things that I want to remember.

    Please keep an open mind when reading my topics. The statements that I make are opinions based on the information that I have. That information is not complete so I may have reached the wrong conclusion because of missing information. However I am always honest even if I am not always right.

    I think that about 90% of my stove knowledge has come from this and the preceding two CCS websites. It has not come from reading topics but from reading the information in the reference sections. People give opinions in the topics but things like parts lists are usually but only usually factual. There are sometimes errors on them.

    My maintenance knowledge is self taught. I grew up in a period when everything was in short supply. If something broke you either repaired it or did without. Broken items were usually put "on the shelf" in case some of their parts could be used to repair other things or even to make other useful things. Being a bodger is now an insult meaning that the person messes jobs up. Originally a bodger worked in a furniture factory and made useful objects out of the scrap wood pile so worthless junk was turned into sellable products. To some extent I am a bodger of the original meaning.

    One of my neighbours introduced me to his son in law in a very strange way. He said "This is Bryan. He can repair anything" If I had not been so gob smacked I would have told him that I was good at repairing things because I was even better at breaking the blasted things.

    I am currently trying to fill in gaps of information on the website and am finding that interesting as it shows collector's interests. I watch the indexes to see what brands engender interest. Collectors are very conservative in their interests. A topic about Primus or Optimus draws a lot of interest. Topics about RM draw a lot of interest. Not a lot of interest is shown in Thermidor or Veritas despite the same models having been made in the three brand names

    When I collected I got very excited when I found a "new" make of stove. Collectors seem to shear away from any unfamiliar brand name and yet those makes are usually interesting and often cheap.

    Regards Bryan
     
  8. Texas

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    I second and third the comments re Bryan's posts. Being sort of a bodger myownself (I'd never heard the term)I never throw away good and/or reuseable materials.

    Anyway, the comment I was trying to make was this, we never seem to read a good review of a new encyclopedia but there are plenty of reviews of whatever literature is popular at the moment. Bryan's experiences and knowledge are amazing to me and much appreciated.

    Bob
     
  9. kaw550red

    kaw550red RIP

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    Hi Bob

    It is surprising how long an unconventional or bodged job can last.

    A lash up is a term for a job that has to be done without adequate time to think the solution through properly. You have to make a decision fast and stick with it. This was my last professional lash up.

    Just before I retired the covering of a school roof broke free from the roof structure and started banging up and down. It was still waterproof but potentially very dangerous. One of our building surveyors approached me and asked me to have a look at it and cure the problem. It was not my problem but I was considered the office flat roof expert so I was asked to do it as a favour. The criteria I had to meet was that I had to make the surface safe, it had to stay watertight and I had no money to spend to achieve that result. There was not the money to strip and recover the roof which was the best solution. Apart from that the problems were simple. Naturally I was curious to see if I could do it so took it on although I was very sarcastic at the constraints that I had.

    Wind is one of the greatest enemies of flat roofs because wind flowing across a flat surface causes an uplift. Effectively it tries to pull the covering upwards. That was what had caused the damage and was still causing the roof covering to flap up and down. Wind uplift is also a problem when camping in strong winds.

    I worked in a multidiscipline office which included structural engineers. I reasoned that if I could load the roof covering with sufficient weight to negate the wind uplift that would cure the flapping up and down. The problem is that roofs are usually designed to withstand a superimposed load of 15 lbs per square foot and I had no idea what uplift the wind created so I went to the structural engineers, told them the problem, told them what I wanted to do and asked them if it was feasible and if so how far apart to space sand bags on the roof. I think the spacing was about a metre apart but the engineer said that it could only be a temporary repair which would have to be repaired a soon as possible because a snowfall would overload the roof.

    Our new budget started 3 weeks later so I ordered the work done and told the building surveyor that the roof covering must be replaced immediately that the financial year started as it was unsafe if it snowed. I also told the headmaster that I had only done a temporary repair and a proper repair would be done shortly. I retired and forgot about it

    Eight years later I was sitting next to another one of the structural engineers at the office Xmas dinner and he asked me if I remembered my sandbag roof repair which I did. He then told me that a building surveyor had recently been to see him to ask him why that roof had a pretty pattern of sand bags on it. He enjoyed my shocked expression. He insisted that he was not taking the mickey and that the "repair" had lasted 8 years without any problem. He seemed to enjoy me disbelieving what he was telling me.

    Theoretically the roof should have collapsed as soon as any snow fell on it

    Regards Bryan