Primus 96 Heat Output

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by 907_Nick, Aug 10, 2020.

  1. 907_Nick

    907_Nick United States Subscriber

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    I've been reading through the forums a fair bit about these stoves - I've become fascinated with them due to their small size. They seem the most likely to actually make it into a backpack. Don't get me wrong, I use all my stoves but mostly on rafting and car camping trips where I don't have to haul it.

    I do some solo winter camping and I've used an Omnifuel and a Svea123 in a Sigg Tourist. The Omnifuel will burn some serious fuel if you're not careful and crank it up, more of a group stove for sure. The Svea actually does pretty well and I don't need to double prime that often with the addition of a carbon felt priming wick - but I do need to fill the tank all the time.

    Now to the point of the post, I see a lot of mentions about how weak the BTU output is on the Primus 96. However, it my garage testing, it seams to be on pair or better than all three of my Svea 123's. Am I missing something here? Do I just have a bunch of slacker Svea's? I will admit, that you are a lot less likely to lose a part/piece of a Svea when deploying/packing the stove.
     
  2. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    Great stoves with many a fan here; I have 5 or 6 of various manufacturers, including the near-same Monitor 17b, plus a couple of Thermidors.

    But for the backpack keroburner, for me it's the one-pinters; the Optimus 00, Primus 210, Svea 121 etc. More capacity, fewer little parts to lose in the campground duff.

    The 96s are extremely nifty, which I think is their big attraction, but are more suitable as a picnic or roadside brew-up stove rather than a backpacking stove.

    The exception would be the Manaslu 96, which is a half-pinter with a 'conventional' (non-lipstick) burner.

    They all seem hot enough for the job, though.
     
  3. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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  4. Haggis

    Haggis Subscriber

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    Lots of (folk) folk on this forum have me eclipsed entirely when it comes to knowledge and experience with these sorts of stoves, but I do use mine. As mentioned by everyone always, the standard sort of 96 has a bunch of parts to not lose, while the 8r, 99, or the 123(r) have but few that can even be lost. The 123(r) lends itself to riding inside a tall kettle or billy pot,,, the others not so much, so if space is an issue, the 123(r) usually wins for me.

    Can’t say that I’m a devotee of the liquid gas stove though, never mind I have dozens of them, I prefer the less explosive and higher BTU qualities of kerosene.

    The regular sort of 96 warms quickly, lights easily, and will have a stove matched pot of water boiling in very short order, but with all its easy to lose and difficult to replace parts, I’ll keep mine out of the bush.

    As to which of this lot burns hottest or boils water fastest? The few btu/seconds difference between them certainly won’t significantly alter what ever it is I intend to accomplish in a day...

    My 1936 Primus 96 and an Olicamp Spacesaver Mug,,, a nigh perfect match.

     
  5. Cookie

    Cookie United States Subscriber

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    I really like my 96 but for a kero burning brassie I'll take a 210 any day over the 96 for hiking. I enjoy cooking real meals on a cold day and the extra fuel is a plus. Besides the issue of loosing parts I prefer a svea 123, 8R, or 111 for actual use hiking in the winter because the "fiddle factor" with gloves on a brisk morning is much less especially if it's a quick cup of joe or tea beside the trail while on a break. The 96 has it's place and can fill a niche of another stove of slightly higher output often times when hiking. It's lower output would be most evident on really colder days if you were melting snow or cooking a frozen steak on a windy day for example. The perfect brass kero burner for solo or plus one hiking just might be the Manaslu 96.
     
  6. Haggis

    Haggis Subscriber

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    Agreed entirely... I‘ve only had a Manaslu 96 a short while, but I’ve used it quite a bit... Had to force myself to put it away for a bit so I could give other stoves some use...
     
  7. 907_Nick

    907_Nick United States Subscriber

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    Well, looks like I need to try and find a new stove ;-) I can see how the Manaslu 96 would be a great little stove. Basecamp will be getting more in eventually.