Primus No.210 with cycle clip - 1932

Discussion in 'Primus No:210' started by kerophile, Mar 25, 2015.

  1. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi, here are some photos of a Primus No.210 stove which I have just restored.

    This stove is interesting as it has been modified for transporting on a bicycle.

    A cast brass split collar has been soldered to the side of the tank, below the filler. The pump knob has been replaced with a No.96 type cap, and the reserve cap exchanged for a home-made hexagonal type, containing a leather washer.

    In addition the legs or pan-holders have been modified by the addition of welded steel uprights to act as pan securers.

    The whole outfit came to me in a home-made wooden storage box which appears to be contemporary with the stove (early 1930s):

    1427281322-St.382-1.jpg 1427281334-St.382-2.jpg 1427281345-St.382-3.jpg 1427281358-St.382-4.jpg 1427281371-St.382-5.jpg 1427281383-St.382-6.jpg 1427281395-St.382-7.jpg 1427281407-St.382-8.jpg 1427281422-St.382-9.jpg 1427281447-St.382-10.jpg 1427281460-St.382-29.jpg 1427281474-St.382-11.jpg 1427281490-St.382-13.jpg 1427281504-St.382-14.jpg 1427281520-St.382-15.jpg 1427281545-St.382-16.jpg 1427281567-St.382-17.jpg 1427281585-St.382-18.jpg 1427281608-St.382-19.jpg 1427281638-St.382-20.jpg

    I have reached my image limit,some additional photos to follow.

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  2. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi, here are some photos of the all important Kerophile coffee test, and of the tank clamping mechanism:

    1427281980-St.382-21.jpg 1427281993-St.382-22.jpg 1427282021-St.382-25.jpg 1427282073-St.382-26.jpg 1427282096-St.382-27.jpg 1427282109-St.382-28.jpg

    I did try to fit the stove tank to my bike but the diameter of the cross-bar was too large. The clamp was obviously made to grip a one-inch nominal diameter tube. I have substituded a broom handle to illustrate the clamping mechanism.

    This particular clamp, unlike others I have seen, is not hinged. Instead, the lower bolt and wing-nut can be released from the fixed half of the clamp which has a slit rather than a plain hole.

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  3. Wim

    Wim Subscriber

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    Hi George, great stove! The cycle clips seem to be exclusive to the UK, never heard of one found our side of the channel. Where did one keep things like burner, spirit can etc? I also like the alternative solution, stove & parts kept in a leather pouch to fit on the upper frame tube, I hope to make one, one of these days.

    All the best,

    Wim
     
  4. Big Si

    Big Si Subscriber

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    That is a really nice find, it's amazing the lengths people will go to to customize there stoves to get the best use out of them.

    Si
     
  5. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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  6. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi Wim and Si, thanks for your kind comments.

    It is easy to forget just how popular cycling was in the years before WW1 and up to WW2, in Britain and I guess the rest of Europe.

    Bicycles had become affordable to the middle and some of the working classes, female emancipation and cycle clothing made the activity respectable, and many weekend cycling clubs were formed.

    What better way for city dwellers to get out into the countryside, get some excercise, and meet girls?

    The other parts of the stove could be carried in a saddle bag or the picnic basket. Isolating the tank means that even with a kerosene leak, the food does not get tainted.

    It is interesting that a new hexagonal reserve cap has been made for this particular stove. This allows it to be tightened down on a leather or rubber seal far more reliably than with a finger-tightened knurled cap.

    This particular stove outfit came from one of the most affluent suburbs of Glasgow. The seller was unable to give me any history prior to the late 1970s. The stove had been "inherited" in an old garden shed, when they bought the house from an elderly gent. It had never been operated during their period of ownership.

    A nice piece of Social History

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  7. Afterburner

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    Nice stove for a bicycle tourer! :thumbup: If it's mounted to a handle bar you can make some coffee/tea while you are cycling (just proper windshield is needed). :lol:
     
  8. Murph

    Murph United States Subscriber

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    It almost looks like someone took a plumber's saddle tap and rebuilt it into a bicycle clamp for touring.

    If so, they were a right smart bugger in the process of setting it all up to work!

    Murph
     
  9. mr optimus

    mr optimus Subscriber

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    A very nice and unusual unique find, it shows some great history when a former owner makes a addition or conversion to a stove for there purpose.

    The home made cast brass bracket for mounting on a bike frame looks like a old water pipe bracket.
    When you see this type of addition, it really tells how much and what the stove was used for, as well as how much it was looked after and how much the owner enjoyed using it
     
  10. OMC

    OMC Subscriber

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    Thank you Kerophile,
    With it's custom pot supports might it have once attached to gunnel rail while drift-fishing the River Clyde?

    As you say it is easy to forget "cycling" as it was back in the day. There might be a brass kerosene lamp attached as well.
    Yes, easy to forget 1932 Raleigh for example, > advertised "all steel" (old bikes had wood rims), > earliest handle brake levers, > frames & forks with a forward sweep, > FRAMES: the quite unique early woman's frames, Raleigh's Irish X-frame etc.

    Cycling was popular but affordable as you point out and many relied on bicycles daily. I'd guess all the clips are 1". I'd guess it's quite a good fit for those that in all weather were routinely cycling distances (esp. cold wet days) to afford HOT lunch or tea anywhere/anytime. thx again omc
     
  11. magikbus

    magikbus Subscriber

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    It must have been really difficult to keep the kettle on the stove whilst cycling????
    Stan
     
  12. tetley

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    i recently saw a photo of one on a foreign (to me in the UK) cycle, but sadly i can't think where. :oops:
     
  13. tetley

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    wim, you'll have already seen this thread, but just in case :content: ... https://classiccampstoves.com/threads/14732
     
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  14. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi, I am sure that I have seen an illustration of a Primus No.41 case hanging from the cross bar of a bicycle, using two leather staps through the metal "staples" on the case ( see image no.1 in this post:
    https://classiccampstoves.com/threads/15740

    The Swedish Military used the same case for a number of different 1 pint collapsible stoves, so it may have been a soldier alongside the bicycle and stove case.
    Does anyone remember this illustration?

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
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  15. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner Admin Subscriber

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  16. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi Ross, Very impressive. I had looked at that catalogue and missed the image!
    You have great recall.
    Best Regards,
    George.
     
  17. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner Admin Subscriber

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    My recall is very selective. I can't remember what I did yesterday!
     
  18. tofta

    tofta Subscriber

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    Gents,
    I have seen similar modifications to both collapsible stoves and household stoves for use on boats (commercial and recreational). One also included pivoting with a weight on a rod vertically down from the stove mount, and an elaborate kettle fixture locking the kettle in place with wing nuts.
    Sadly, I have no pictures, and the only one I can think of still “alive” is a basic wooden box with a household stove in it. This goes to show the importance of these stoves to people – and possibly the importance of being able to make coffee. When I was a boy in the late 60s early 70s, there still where stoves like this on many a fishing boat in the area I grew up, the cost of Trondelag Norway.
     
  19. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    Excellent! I've not seen one in Australia...