Primus No.212 outfit, 1921 (K)

Discussion in 'Primus No:212' started by igh371, Jun 24, 2021.

  1. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Another '212', and one that, as can be seen, no-longer has its original burner. Nevertheless worth adding to the gallery for a couple of reasons, not least its tin.

    But for the moment back to the burner. 212s can be found with the original burner replaced with either 210 roarer or No.4 silent burners. This one has a replacement made using a small Radius burner, more like the original but still not the same. The legs are later spec 210 legs which give a slightly more reliable clearance between burner top and pan than the originals (see discussion here).
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    The tin for this outfit is interesting. At first glance, other than not having one of the brass lid plaques which adorned earlier outfits, it appears identical to those used for the pre-WW1 Condrup 230 and WW1 period 210 outfits (e.g.). But not quite however, this tin has been slightly enlarged to accommodate larger fuel cans. An extra ⅛" had been added to the height of the tin, and the breadth had been increased from 7½" to 7¾". The width is up from 5⅝" to 6". This tin is also different from the tins supplied from 1922 onwards in that it still has sharp square 'corners', where for tins for 1922 rounded corners were adopted(c/f here and here).
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    The wind shield is the same plain hinged cylinder as those supplied by Condrup for earlier outfits, but with the usual user-made cut outs added to improve airflow for priming:
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  2. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    I am reminded by contribution by @tofta in this thread that those '212's thus converted will have had to have had the riser changed as well, in favour of a 210 type. The advantage of the Radius burner substitution on this stove is that it was able to use the original riser with No.5 size threads.

    In that same thread @Radler speculated that "With this short rising tube ... it should be almost self-pressurizing." I can confirm that, certainly with the Radius burner, this is indeed the case. Fill priming ring, close air screw, walk away, and unfailingly one can return in a few minutes to find the stove happily purring away.

    That is a nice feature, but overall I still find it difficult to be certain what the point of the '212' was. I certainly couldn't imagine anyone taking it back packing or cycle camping in preference to a '210' or equivalent. Maybe that is why it was so short lived? But then this was approaching the peak of stove popularity and competition was driving manufacturers to cover all bases. Not a chink had to be left open for a rival to spot a chance to offer an option that you did not offer!
     
  3. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    Another nice stove, Ian.

    Thanks for the detailed post.


    Cheers

    Tony