Primus No.4 1915 'E'

Discussion in 'Primus No:4' started by igh371, Feb 16, 2017.

  1. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Well, actually, yes they would! They may have been used to these inconveniences but that did not mean that they did not aspire to better. It is very much to this point that earliest Primus advertising in the 1890s prominently highlighted the 'odourless', 'clean burning', 'smokeless' and efficient features of these stoves. This example is from 1899:
    Primus ad. 1899 (2).jpg
    So I think people would have noticed a stove model that so very obviously failed live up to the Primus reputation and promises …
    Ian:thumbup:
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2019
  2. Radler

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    @igh371
    "The Svea flame 'leader' and later Primus tube type both work well in saving using the extra match,...."

    I think the main advantage is not only to save a match, but much more to reduce the smell from unburned fuel sorting between pumping and ignition. Even with the very good gas-lighters we have today and with electric ambient light, it takes some seconds.

    I find it very comfortable, just to close the release and give a few pump strokes without stress because of the fuel vapours. I use the brassies daily indoors to make tea.

    Best regards
    Radler
     
  3. Macaroon United Kingdom

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  4. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    @Radler you are absolutely right, saving an additional match is simply a spin-off benefit; the main advantage is not having to cope with the release of unburnt fuel from the stove while the match is being deployed:doh:. Funny how one can take the obvious for granted when using stoves all day (2yrs+ without electric hob):oops:.
    @Macaroon "may be turned completely over [while burning] without the slightest exposure to danger" - I wonder how many have actually tried to test that out:shock: - possibly a new challenge for the next Newark: LIT STOVE JUGGLING?:twisted:


    @brassnipplekey
     
  5. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi @Macaroon.

    1. If a stove is upright the dip tube is sitting in the liquid fuel in the tank and can operate quite happily as long as fuel is available.

    2. It the stove is fully inverted the dip tube is now in the air space of the tank, and the flame should extinguish once the liquid fuel in the fuel line is consumed

    3. If the stove is in an intermediate position between upright and inverted it will run as long as the dip tube is immersed in fuel.

    Blow lamps, which are a first cousin of pressure stoves and designed to be used in a range of tilted (but not fully inverted) positions.

    Some kerosene room heaters were provided with damper a device which stopped combustion once the heater exceeded a pre-set tilt level.

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  6. Macaroon United Kingdom

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    Haha, that sounds quite an "interesting" challenge! More like a circus performance than a stove competition but there might be some willing contestants - not me, I hasten to add! @igh371

    Thanks George, in other words the overturning over the stove in and of itself is not dangerous (in terms of explosion or a conflagration of burning liquid fuel being released). I would think it quickly becomes dangerous however; if the stove carried on burning for a bit as in your scenario 2 and especially 3 then it has a very high chance of setting light to whatever it overturns onto!
     
  7. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

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    @igh371, we'll have to do it after dark. Any suggestions for a donor stove? A dodgy No1 may be lurking about, a No 5 we'll need to find hot bits in the grass.