Primus No.5S:or. 1917 ('G'). Steel pump tube.

Discussion in 'Primus No:5 (inc S & J)' started by igh371, Aug 24, 2018.

  1. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    DSC07538.JPG
    Here we have yet another example of one of those ubiquitous bog-standard Primus model 5S:or stoves. But in this case with 2 little 'secrets'. The first is the year of manufacture, 1917, 'G' date code. A date code I'd been searching long and hard to find an example of, thanks to @tofta for helping to fulfil this 'want'. The problem here in the UK had been that the unleashing of unrestricted U-boat warfare had abruptly curtailed imports from Scandinavia that year!

    The second 'secret' is that this stove has a steel pump tube which gives every appearance of being the original fitting. Was this an adaptation to wartime supply issues? I am aware of steel tanked stoves with brass fittings, but not until now of a brass stove with a steel pump tube:shock:

    As found this stove was so filthy that no details were visible:
    P1040022.JPG

    Once basically cleaned (top photo) both its identity and the fact that all of the removable ancillaries had been replaced by a full set of later date Svea No.1 fittings was revealed! These are all now removed and correct date pattern Primus parts put in place.

    The 'G' date code letter is different from the odd looking font found on 1917 dated Primus 96 stoves (e.g.), but is much more in keeping with the letter font set used on pre-1917 stoves:
    As found: P1040019.JPG , and after a little cleaning: DSC07543 (2).JPG .

    The steel pump tube: DSC07544.JPG DSC07545.JPG .

    And the rest:
    DSC07540.JPG DSC07553.JPG DSC07541.JPG DSC07542.JPG

    DSC07528.JPG
     
  2. optipri

    optipri Subscriber

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    Really interesting. I didn't realize that the 5S:or was that early. More like a 30:s or so.
    And I have never heard of a steel pump tube. Why make it that way, not much to save. I have never heard that brass was a spare in those days. More likely that steel was. Looking forwards to further input in this matter.

    Bo
     
  3. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi Copper was in great demand for munitions, in particular shell-cases, during WW1. The UK has no copper natural resources so all has to be imported from overseas. The German U-boat campaign was extremely effective and there were massive losses of merchant shipping.

    https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/british-naval-convoy-system-introduced

    Consequently all metals were subject to Government control and allocation during the whole of WW1 (and WW2)

    https://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/shells_crisis_of_1915

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Driving_band

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2018
  4. tofta

    tofta Subscriber

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    Seldom has a stove found a better home, isn’t CCS a wonderful place.

    :content::content::content: :content::content::content:
     
  5. Afterburner

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    Or: "Seldom has a stove found a better Land Rover" :lol::lol::lol:
     
  6. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Some further thoughts regarding that steel pump tube. I have checked every detail inside and out and everything, from the NRV fixing to the slight lead in chamfer for the leather cup, measures exactly the same as a normal brass tube. But then here is a thought - could there be some connection, causal or just short term production convenience, with the fact that this was also year (1917) when Primus introduced its steel no.s 401/3/5 stove range?
     
  7. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi, @igh371 , 1917 stands out as the tipping point in the Merchant shipping war of WW1.

    It was the year shipping losses reached a peak, Germany declared unrestricted submarine warfare against all allied shipping, the USA entered the war.
    The imminent transfer, over the Atlantic Ocean, of over a million US troops finally forced the Admiralty to introduce the convoy system, and this turned the tide in the submarine assault.

    So 1917 was an important year, and could help explain the wider use of steel in stove manufacture as copper supplies became progressively tighter.

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.