Primus Omnilite Ti vs Edelrid Hexon

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by TylerDrogin, Sep 3, 2020.

  1. TylerDrogin United States

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    Hello Classic Camp Stoves community,

    I hope I am in the right place.

    I am looking to buy either the Edelrid Hexon or the Primus Omnilite Ti. I am looking for a compact, lightweight multifuel stove that can burn a wide range of fuel types, and is reliable. The purpose of the stove would be global travel and adventure (at some point in the future when travel is appropriate).

    I have narrowed it down to the Omnilite ti or the Edelrid Hexon. I have read a lot of in-depth reviews that speak highly about the omnilite ti. Do any of you know how the Edelrid hexon compares? I have read that many people complain that the pot legs on the hexon have a tendency to warp with high heat, is this true?

    When it comes to the omnilite, I have read that some people complain that it clogs and requires maintenance often. Is it a more high-maintenance stove than other comparable ones out there?

    Any other thoughts on the matter are welcome.

    Thank you!
     
  2. Sternenlicht

    Sternenlicht Subscriber

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    Hej @TylerDrogin

    welcome to the forum!
    A further "light weight" stove which burns petrol, white gas, gas and kerosene is the MSR Whisperlite Universal. Beside that it is really quiet compared to the both you mentioned.

    Both stoves you mentioned are nice, but I would take the Omnilite. It has no loop, which is difficult to clean when blocked. It has also a fine regulation, the spindle is near the burner.

    What about Optimus Nova or Polaris, or MSR XGK EX or Dragonfly. Especially the last one is often recommended in CCS. Too heavy?

    Ciao, Basti
     
  3. Reflector

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    I'd recommend the Omnilite Ti or the Whisperlite as well. The Omnilite is a smaller stove with a smaller burner (silencer bell from Primus or the stock burner bell) pattern. The Whisperlite is a bit of a wider burner pattern. I've successfully converted them both to run alcohol by drilling out one of the jets (kerosene in both, bought spares) with a 1/32" drill. The Whisperlite is a little better for alcohol due to the loop getting fairly hot enough to burn 91% isopropyl (the cheapest alcohol for btus-per-dollar).

    The Omnilite is a super, super lightweight and compact multifuel stove however and it also has the valve before the jet which means better simmering if you don't have the patience to fiddle with the pump side valve. You also don't have to change the fuel hose connection block like the Whisperlite Universal as the pump has the same lindal valve and thread as isobutane canisters. No fiddling around with a little stamped wrench and nut to swap over, just a jet change which is a bit easier than the Whisperlite.
     
  4. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    You are in the right place.
     
  5. Lennart F Sweden

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    And in most cases the Primus works with good enough output on the small jet so you don't need to change jets at every fuel change - Whisperlite is very nice but demands more fiddling and fettling when changing fuels.
     
  6. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    @TylerDrogin I featured the Edelrid Hexon HERE. It’s a good stove, with a handy adaptor to easily install it in a Trangia.

    3D031366-CFDF-4876-82CF-DD28C3A02EF9.jpeg

    92D1E1A8-19AE-4727-BD6B-E0B9844527DD.jpeg

    96845E9B-1A0B-4138-8FBF-35A2157AB789.jpeg


    Multifuel (white gasoline/kerosene/isobutane) too without changing jets.
     
  7. TylerDrogin United States

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    Thank you all for the help so far! Amazing. @presscall, have you had issues with the legs of the Hexon warping?
     
  8. TylerDrogin United States

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    @Sternenlicht, thank you for the input. I actually have used the MSR Dragonfly and like it, but yes, I am looking for something lighter and smaller, ideally something that would fit in a pot. The Dragonfly can be quite big. From what I can tell, the Hexon and Omnilite ti are two of the smallest out there that burn most fuel types.
     
  9. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    I see from someone who posted a comment in that thread I started that Edelrid revised the design of the legs, but no, I’ve not had them warp.
     
  10. Tron

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    I would choose the Optimus Polaris. One jet, magnetic cleaning needle, reliable. It is not a perfect stove for kerosene, but it works.

    I also have the omnilte ti, and use it a lot, love that stove. But I would never rely on it burning anything but white gas and gas canister fuel without very frequent cleaning. It clogs easily and you have to remove the jet and use a needle to clean it. Its a shame Primus did not put in an internal cleaning needle.

    Kind regards
    Tron
     
  11. Phantom

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    Sounds like a very interesting conversion. Can you provide more information, or a link to a relevant thread? Thanks.

    In my limited experience, Isopropyl doesn’t burn very cleanly in alcohol stoves: it tends to cause a lot of soothing. Methanol (“methyl hydrate” in Canada) works much better and is typically less expensive, too. YMMV!

    The Primus ExpressLander VF might be another option.

    Ostensibly it’s no longer made; but AFAIK the Primus Spider with MultiFuel Kit is the same product.

    It’s tiny, and significantly less expensive than the Omnilite Ti. Can anyone usefully contrast those two stoves?
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2020
  12. Reflector

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    No threads - it was something I found out that someone could drill their Whisperlite jets with an approximate 1/32" drill so sufficiently enlarge it as to be able to run enough alcohol through given the air mix ratio. 1/32" because it was the smallest size drill I could find at the time from a Dremel drill set. You just use something like a pin vise to hold onto your drill bit and hand drill (downward pressure and some rotation) the jet out.

    My advice is you may want to start out with something smaller than a 1/32" drill and incrementally work your way up until the stove runs stably. It only really works on liquid fuel stoves that have sufficient thermal feedback. Of the Omnilite, it does work and especially well with the factory silencer. In my experience, the Berniedog silencer can underburn with alcohol but not the Primus one.

    In regards to preheat: Don't use isopropyl to preheat directly, it does soot if it isn't burning as a gas. It doesn't soot too badly and wipes away or otherwise "burns" off in open flame. I usually keep a separate bottle of methanol/ethanol or mixed alcohol to preheat the stove anyways. You want to give the stove's priming pad/cup a decent amount to work with for the preheat burn so it gets very, very hot and they'll happily run isopropyl like it was white gas with solid blue flames. When the stove is sufficiently hot, the bottle can be pressurized and cranked all the way up for some serious output.

    Also 91% isopropyl can be "boosted" with denatured (methanol/ethanol) to make it burn easier/need less of a preheat for startup. I've experimented before in the past by adding 15-30% and it does make some stoves easier in regards to reducing the necessity of preheat. For stoves that preheat easily and also generate tons of thermal feedback, they'll burn all the way down to 70-80% isopropyl (the rest being water). The MSR Simmerlite I have found to be a "good" stove in that regard.

    The reason I find isopropyl useful is because during non-pandemic times, a large 32oz bottle of 91% isopropyl is dirt cheap to the point it is comparable to a gallon of white gas in regards to the amount of BTUs per dollar. It is commonly available/easily found as well. Isopropyl alcohol fumes aren't as "nasty" as white gas and quickly go away. Isopropyl alcohol is also not as corrosive as methanol when in contact with aluminum (at least to my understanding) but I store it in coated bottles from Optimus and Primus anyways. I am also fairly certain it doesn't really have anything that lets it "clog" the fuel lines or jets, in my experience of running through several gallons worth over several years and never finding any buildup.