Primus - pre-1896 (pre-model marking)

Discussion in 'Primus Early US Made Models' started by BernieDawg, Apr 6, 2008.

  1. BernieDawg Banned

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    Hi gents
    Here's an oldie I picked up for cheap recently. It's minus it's legs but I thought I'd share pictures in case it's of historical significance.

    It seems to have a weird NRV. Looks like I need a special tool to get the pump tube out.

    Here it is.
    Cheers,
    Gary

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    1355238386-010.jpg 1355238396-012.jpg 1355238406-013.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  2. Lance

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    That tool you are talking about is called a spanner here in the states and is much like a sickle in shape with a knob on the open end. It fits into the hole and when the wrench handle is pressed upon spins the cap to which it is applied. these tools are commonly found in marinas or on a fire truck but the ones used for this stove would be much smaller. Another place you might find one is in a tool kit for a micrometer measuring tool. but that tool may be a bit small for this stove.

    Considering the description you have given i am thinking this may well be the mother of all stoves. In particular when you describe it being spun rather than a stamping. This would have been the way to make the metal bottom if one had not yet worked out the process of making a metal forming die to the specs necessary for mass manufacturing. This would also be the best way to seal the metal from corrosion as the process of spinning the shape causes the burnishing tool used to press the metal into shape also seals the pores of the metal.

    lance
     
  3. Nordicthug

    Nordicthug R.I.P.

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    I've heard that "wrench" called a hook spanner to differentiate it from a pin spanner. The you find some on boats that have two different sized pins and one leg on a pivot. That's called a universal pin spanner and is used to undo the covers on fuel and water deck fills.

    Gerry
     
  4. Prime Us

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    Hey Gary,
    That's a very neat old stove. McMaster has those wrenches (and everything else) I guessed at the size, so if this is wrong, they have others:

    55165A32
    Metric Fixed Head Pin Style Spanner Wrench for 16 to 18mm Circle Dia, 2.5mm Pin Dia, 3/32" L Pin
    In stock at $19.77 Each

    You can go to mcmaster.com and chose a category right on their front page, or enter the part number and it will jump to the correct page.

    Have fun,
    Gary
     
  5. Ian

    Ian Subscriber

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    Looks interesting. I'd get it cleaned up a bit so you can check it out for writing that may be hidden under the crud.
     
  6. darlton

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    Definitely a nice one there, if no date code then pre-1911 but not too much pre as the earlier ones has a distinctive bell shaped font.
    Is it the camera angle, or does it look like the font has been squashed a bit, looks like an apple core?

    Cheers,
    Fr Laurence
     
  7. nagant

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    there was a similar unit that had a heater contraption on it. i saved it in my watch list but the pic isn't veiwable any more. had a 1893 patent that i think was on the fillercap. i emailed the winner to see if he could send me pics, it went for under $50 :roll: i forgot to get a bid in
     
  8. DAVE GIBSON

    DAVE GIBSON Subscriber

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    Gary..i don't know anything about that stove but when people talk about cleaning up
    really old things like that i always hark back to the Antiques Road show where the guy
    tells the owner of a old gun..."yup--it would sell for $2500 bucks---$25,000 if you had
    not cleaned all the old blueing off and poly coated the stock"....
     
  9. ArchMc

    ArchMc SotM Winner Subscriber

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    I'm thinking this is a really old one. Nice find!

    I wonder if Ross has any information on the "G.M. Thurnauer",engraved on the cap as the agent for these stoves in USA and Canada?

    As to cleaning, personally I would defer to kerophile on this one. I agree with him that a good even patina is part of a stove's history. He is also the best source for cleaning the stove, if that's what you want to do. I would at least try to get the worst of the corrosion -- especially that one spot. If there's something under there to be read, that information would be valuable (my personal opinions, here).

    Re: the story about cleaning the old gun: This may be presumptuous, but I think this forum may be the closest we're going to find to expert opinion on the best way to "preserve" an antique stove. (Obviously, cash value is not determined here.) We've talked about this issue in past postings; perhaps this is a good place to expand on the subject.
    ....Arch
     
  10. Lance

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    Gary please reduce the size of these photos to the message board size so that they are easier to see. High res is okay but not larger than what fits on smaller screen. Thanks in advance.

    lance
     
  11. Locksmith_500

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    Hello Gary
    Really nice stove you got there :D

    I'm in the same spot as you are wondering what to do with my two stoves looking like yours, there one is missing a leg, but I'm also feeling confident to make them work again even regarding some soldering with a new leg.
    :? :? :? :?
     
  12. Christer Carlsson

    Christer Carlsson Moderator SotM Winner

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    I made a tool for my pump tube out of an old adjustable wrench.
    The holes in my pumptube are 2.8 mm. I don't have a drill in that dimension, so I made the holes in the wrench 3 mm, and turned two pins to 2.8 in one end and just over 3.0 mm in the other, tapped them down in the jaws of the wrench, and I got a pretty able tool to remove my pump tube.

    1276359885-bahco1.jpg 1276359892-bahco2.jpg

    The tool is a Bahco, what else to use on an old stove? :whistle:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  13. BernieDawg Banned

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    Here are the pump details I neglected to post so long ago.

    1297443194-IMGP6660.jpg

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  14. OMC

    OMC United States Subscriber

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    OLD THREAD alert
    I arrived at this thread researching "the Primus" (Sweden). Arch is right thinking this is a really old one. It turns out, it's born in Sweden and, like many, it is well traveled (to US, to UK), Ross ended up with it.
    @Spiritburner Ross, Can this be moved to
    > Primus Early Model (in-numbered), please?

    The tank lid on the above stove, incl. G.M. Thurnauer is certainly a liitle known twist in very early (c1892) Primus history.
    thx omc
    PS I arrived here via a Christer post, here (a tank lid anomaly w/that one as well fwiw).