Re-soldering Stove Legs.

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by kerophile, Dec 14, 2006.

  1. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi, I was going through old emails and found some advice on re-attaching stove legs to the brass tanks of stoves, which I had written for a friend some time ago. I thought I would post them in case anyone else needed such advice:

    I started my solder repairs using a small, half-pint kerosene blowlamp,which does the job but I was later given a gas torch by a good friend and that is easier as it has a narrower flame and is more controllable.

    I find that what we amateurs lack is practice, you improve during a soldering session but then set the tools aside for a few weeks or months and have to climb the learning curve all over again, next time. I bet the people in the Primus Factory could solder well in their sleep!

    Legs can be difficult, but I was given some good advice several years ago by Bryan Miller. He said; clean all surfaces well, flux and tin them, and then try a dry assembly.
    Have a clear space to work on, and good lighting, take plenty of time, don't have the torch lit,

    He recommended "wiring" the legs to a pan-ring to fix them in their correct relative position. The bottom of the legs can also be wired to each other, to locate them and tension them against the tank. I have also used a couple of turns of steel wire around the legs, where they contact the tank. When this band of wire is tensioned it pulls the legs into the correct location. All this is done before you light up the torch, so that you can re-position the leg or legs at any stage.

    I have also used what we call a "Jubilee Clip" in the UK, I don't know their name is in the US. These are hose-clips with a rack embossed on the metal strap and a screw fixed on the other end of the band. As the screw is tightened the diameter of the hose clip reduces, and tensions the hose onto the pipe. These come in a wide range of diameters. and it is possible to get them big enough to go around the tank of a two-pint stove, with the legs in place. You tension this hose clip to lock the leg into its correct location.

    Once all this dry-assembly is completed and you are happy with it, the soldered areas are fluxed,and the adjacent areas masked. Now is the time to think about lighting your torch and re-attaching the leg. The best advice must be to use minimum heat to do the job, by keeping the torch jet narrow and trying to avoid over-heating the tank and melting adjacent solder joints. Sefa has advised putting water in the pump cylinder to keep it cool during near-by soldering operations.

    I have successfully re-attached single legs "free-hand" but it is always a bit hit-or-miss as to whether you get the perfect alignment you are aiming for.

    I hope the above is of some use. Any comments or additional tips gladly received.

    Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  2. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    Hey, Kerophile,

    Many thanks! Great stuff, and I've already saved it to my "Fettling File"!! Thanks for sharing, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc Mark
     
  3. Henry

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    Hint
    If you don't have one big enough, undo 2 or 3 or 4 or more and put them together, make 'em as big as you like :D
     
  4. sefaudi

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    Hi Kerophile,

    You always teach us great lectures. Very much appreciated.

    As for leg soldering, finally I decided to use pan support. Mounting legs to pan support allows keeping upper parts of legs fixed. Also with this way I get correct angles i.e. 60 degrees between adjacent legs. No need to bind bottom parts of the legs to others by means of a wire.

    I strongly advice you to border soldering area with a nail polish in order to prevent unwanted large soldering area.

    Best regards,
    Sefa
     
  5. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi Sefa, Great to hear from you again!
    I was thinking today that we had not heard from you for some time. I hope you are well.
    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  6. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi Sefa, I believe the angle between adjacent legs is 120 degrees, not 60!

    3 x 120 deg = 360 deg.

    Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  7. bajabum

    bajabum R.I.P.

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    Over here, they're called 'Hose Clamps', and you can get them several feet long!
     
  8. DougR

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    True but only when measured from an imaginary point.
    If you dip the ends of the legs in dye, then print thr three dots on a sheet of paper and then join them up - you should get an equilateral triangle - having interior angles of 60�.

    It all depends on how you look at it.
     
  9. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi Doug, not wishing to be Pedantic....... But;

    Both Sefa and I did say "the angle between adjacent legs"

    Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  10. DougR

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    Actually, the equilateral triangle notion is the clue to a useful jig - fits stoves of a variety of different sizes....
     
  11. Nordicthug

    Nordicthug R.I.P.

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    Coupla things about trying to keep solder from flowing all over everywhere. Flux and tin the mating surfaces. Then, once you've got your cooled parts assembled and clamped, apply heat sparingly with a soldering copper. If you've got to use a torch, try applying a welder's soapstone crayon mark to the area you do not want solder to stick.

    Gerry
     
  12. barrabruce

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    Mine tended to go loose when the solder melts and the legs soak into the molten pool!

    Used a G- Clamp though. Called one because you say Gheesuz F%%%'n Christ a lot trying to get it to sit right and clamp the leg in place with out sliding off or dinting font.

    But mostly after you heat things up and it falls off.
    Leaving you to redo or set by eye!!

    Sort of a religious experiance!!!!

    Think I'll try by eye or wire or jig or hose /jubalee clamp.
    Next time and a lump of hot copper solder tool.
    If I heated the top end of the leg near the font up it radiates down to the bottom after an initial pre warm.
    Thought it may help to stop the dreaded bottom drip from the tank seal at base!!!

    :lol: :lol:
    Bruce
    P.s
    Sedafu how do yo get rid of the nail polish after it has burnt?
    Had a hard time getting some off but it did tend to work though!!
     
  13. sefaudi

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    Dear All,

    Just before I posted my message here, I was trying to solve a problem on a triangle shaped project. That made me confused. Of course the angles between adjacent legs should read 120 degrees. In order to get correct angles and correct position for the legs, I use original fabricated pan support.

    Hey Bruce, cleaning burnt nail polis is so simple. Just wash it by using a washing spongle. Nothing remains.

    Hey Kerophile, I am very fine. Thanks for asking. I am nowadays working so hard. I have to complete so many jobs before Christmant starts. That's why I was unable read posts here.

    Best regards,
    Sefa
     
  14. magpiestovie

    magpiestovie Subscriber

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    thanks,

    I had done this before reading your advice, I think you are right about the practice-Mistake I made was to leave the heat on too long so not proud of the soldering but it worked

    I did ty-rap a pan ring to the legs and secured legs with wire so great minds and all that. Have done the job and fixed the leg on-see photo.

    IMG_20200424_125504836.jpg
     
  15. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi @magpiestovie . Your Monitor stove is looking good.

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  16. Unclebumble United States

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    I recently acquired this Primus No.1.S:or As you can see, it has NO LEGS.
    20200623_094449.jpg

    I have looked around on CCS and other places and it seems these had one piece formed steel pot legs that are directly soldered to the tank. IE, not removable. I have not seen anything on CCS where someone replaced/re-soldered this type of leg. So, I have a few questions. Are there one piece legs like the "original" available anywhere? Does it detract from the value if you replace that with a foot and removable leg? If so, should I consider forming my own legs? If so, is there a detailed dimension drawing anywhere?
     
  17. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Re-soldering stove legs:

    Fettling a Primus No.4 from 1928.

    Fettling Hovik Primus.

    Re-soldering feet or leg-sockets:

    1911 Primus No.100 Resurrection.

    Leg dimensions and method of making stove legs:

    If you scroll down this link you will see the profile /dimensions for the legs of a collapsible 1.75 pint stove, A Radius No.17.

    Radius No:17 *

    If you check the burner top to the top of the flat section of the legs for your stove, it should be approximately 1/4 inch or 6 mm

    The drawing should be useful for any stove of this type.

    As to making the legs, have a look at this classic post by Bryan Miller:

    Making Replacement Legs

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.




    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2020
  18. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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  19. Unclebumble United States

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    Am I wrong in thinking that the Primus No.1.S had from the factory similar legs ( one piece of metal, formed to tank and extended to make the support leg) as the Norwegian Primus Stove in the previous response?? Is there a plan or drawing somewhere for those legs?? UncleBumble
     
  20. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Q1. Yes to familiarity with legs of Hovik stove I showed.

    No to Q2...as far as I know.

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.