Silent burners: were they responsible for the death of liquid fuel stoves?

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by Colin Geer, Aug 1, 2018.

  1. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    Yes please.

    Your special beach sounds amazing.
     
  2. Matty

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    In September 2016 the United States Antarctic Program were still using Coleman gasoline camp stoves. Perhaps they still are.
     
  3. dogface

    dogface United States Subscriber

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    Colin Geer, may I suggest you start a colony of Dermestid beetles for cleaning your daughter's skulls.

    http://www.skulltaxidermy.com/kits.html

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dermestidae

    When I was a small boy I used to wander/explore everywhere. One place was the science building at the college where my father taught. In the summer the only person there was a biologist, who was a friend of the family. He toiled away at his specialty, which was parasitology, all alone in the big dark building. He was mysterious and a bit intimidating to me, and realizing this he tried to interest me in his work. It was during one of these visits that he introduced me to his dermestid beetle colony, in a stainless steel drum, with skulls in various stages of being stripped of their flesh. This was fascinating to me, as I had no idea anybody did this sort of thing. The skulls would be stripped entirely clean.

    My first encounter with this wizard was one day when I stealthily crept into an empty classroom, to find large jars lined up on a table at the front of the room. The blinds were drawn on the windows so the room was fairly dark, with only a little light slanting in through the cracks in the blinds, to illuminate the contents of the jars ......... human babies at different levels of development, preserved in fluid. I stood and stared, in shock, frightened, for I knew what they were, but did not understand the why of them being there ........ after all, they were human, like me. I don't know how long I stood there, but the biologist appeared at the door, and there was a look of sadness on his face, that I can only understand in retrospect, it should not have happened like this, I was too young. He spoke, I asked, he explained, I said they killed the babies, he denied, and justified, attempted to explain what I could not understand. Eventually he decided the best course of action was distraction, and so he herded me into his lab, and let me look through his microscope at trichinosis cysts in a thin section taken from a dead woman's deltoid muscle.
     
  4. dogface

    dogface United States Subscriber

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    As to the subject matter of the original post; in general, people are like water, in that they search out the easiest path downhill, there to form into a puddle, and become stagnant.

    We are constantly searching for the easiest way to get what we want, for the least expenditure. This is normal, but like many things normal, it can, and is taken too far. There is much to be said for not taking the easy way, rather to expend a bit more, for much more in return.

    The old stoves are not the most efficient, they take more investment than the cheap things that are good enough for the majority nowadays, but they give a satisfaction that no modern stove can equal. I guess one must needs be a crazy stovie to really understand that.
     
  5. janders

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    Hmm, We used to put what we wanted stripped of flesh in the nearest ant hill...
     
  6. Mark Layman

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    Oh Ed I do not know you but yes indeed it is commonly agreed. God bless.
     
  7. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    Thank you sir, much appreciated. Honda and Toyota aren't cheap either!
     
  8. camper52

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    My mother had a Speed Queen - averaged 3 (heavy) full loads for 25 years with never a problem, until finally something broke down. When the repairman came and saw the machine's age he was amazed. His comment: "lady you got at least 3 lifetimes from that machine. Nothing made today can match it!".
    I still have my first coleman 2-burner - working - and my old $25 coleman cooler [upgraded with extra external insulation, lid hinges & latch] which I still use. No overweight, overpriced, overhyped Yeti for me. GG
     
  9. snwcmpr

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    They are still made today. The one we got, 3 or 4 years ago, match it.
     
  10. Hazet

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    So confused. :cry:
    What is this thread about...silent burners, dead animal skulls, or washing machines (with an aside about Toyota)? :-k :? :content:
     
  11. snwcmpr

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    It is actually about ... Thread Drift.
     
  12. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    Yes.
     
  13. Doc Mark

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    Good Morning, All,

    Regarding why older stoves are not popular, nor supported any longer, I think that @dogface smacked smacked it out of the Park with his excellent response! People ARE seeking the easy way to do things, and if I might add to that thought, they are also seeking to do things with the least amount of learning to be done. Instant gratification is the key, these days, and we Old Timers are really the only ones embracing the old ways as "better", or more enjoyable. At least it seems that way, sometimes....... Silent burners had nothing to do with the demise of the older products. A desire for "Convenience" is what caused this, sadly. My 'tuppence, and worth what you paid to read it. Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  14. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    I'm an appliance luddite. I don't want control boards that cost $1000 to replace in an appliance that costs $1200 total. I don't want a screen on the front of my fridge and a camera inside - I want one box that stays 40F and another that stays 0F and that's it. I did buy a device that sticks to the front with a magnet and has sensors inside that shows the temp of the fridge and freezer. It has nothing at all to do with the fridge and when it dies, I'll spend $20 and replace it, instead of having to replace the whole fridge or the $1000 control board mentioned above. I don't want a glass top stove that's easy to clean but a PITA to actually cook on. I don't want a fitbit for my dog or Amazon Dash buttons all over my house. There is no reason for my toaster, fridge, or any other appliance to be connected to the internet - and plenty of reasons for them not to be. Sure as HELL not my garage door opener.

    End rant, thank you for listening.
     
  15. Rickybob United Kingdom Banned

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    this is what killed off the brassie three leggers

    garlic1.jpg

    disposable butane cannisters
    and an early gassie to match

    garlic2.jpg
    lighting one of those at Newark will probably get you a stake in the heart!
     
  16. msgermaine

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    no need to get beetles...the tax man will pick over your bones for free :(

    mike
     
  17. BradB

    BradB United States Subscriber

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    It is natural for humans to keep trying to make things better and easier. The problem occurs when for a particular generation of people the changes cause something to become nearly unrecognizable to what we were used to using. For example, I grew up shooting recurve bows. As compounds evolved I tried them but it just wasn't the same as shooting my old recurves. I still shoot recurve and long bow. Compounds to me are an abomination of archery. But they are quite good at what they are designed to do. I want no part of them. If you grew up with compounds and propane stoves they would be the standard to which you compared further developments. Of course "better" might be subjective and we all know where our crusty old crowd here at CCS stands on these matters!

    Brad
     
  18. OMC

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    all,
    Pardon the lengthy drift (in hindsight a move of topic to lounge gets my vote).
    Re dogface "As to the subject matter of the original post; in general, people are like water, in that they search out the easiest path downhill, there to form into a puddle, and become stagnant."

    Dogface is not asking but IMO as worded it's a dark view.
    I concede only that
    ...some people are like water, in that they search out the easiest path downhill, there to form into a puddle, and become stagnant.

    If life is a hill? ...some people end up on a slippery slope (for whatever reason)
    or maybe there's is an uphill battle but is trending uphill
    or on the hillside (content to) just maintain / treading water (it's all you can do not to lose ground).
    and yes those that do seem to be in a race to the bottom (friends you can not help, if they'll not help themselves).
    Some parts of our hill are steeper than others, you may find your path nears "the edge" or it may become slippery without warning or both.
    [TMI: is the bottom the puddle? For this dark view, note also the "bottom feeders"].

    I grant you the puddle at the bottom is crowded. "Working poor" is a new category for the US (never before) and it's the fastest growing demographic iirc (employed, living below the poverty level).
    Some may take the easy way but for many near the bottom nothing in life easy.

    My outlook for mankind / womankind (including current & future generations) has our one percenters at the top, with most of the ninety-nine percenters near the bottom, relatively speaking.
    There are however, plenty productive hard working families / persons on our hill.
    Hard working for 30-50 years, have done everything that is asked of them, proceeding with their life's game plan... then the goal posts were moved!! Oh, the economy "needed to be adjusted" and workers (the victims) needed to pick up the tab for that one.
    Most US retirement savings still rely on stock market, retirement plans can, again, vanish with one crash.
    We are animals, many *evolve (/accept evolution) to thrive or just survive. Many do not.
    Stagnant young in the puddle is a sad state of affairs, I grant you that but case by case this can be reversed (it takes a village).

    Those well beyond their prime that "settle" or become stagnant (in puddle or on the hillside), for me that is a typical norm. Prime "working years" are spent.

    *Camp stoves have merely evolved.
    I continue to be most interested in the evolution / development trends of camp stoves 1880s - 1920s onward.
    As to current camp stove developments, I'm in denial. Only if I consider it, I have a dark view and doesn't pertain to silent vs a proper stove. It is re availability of affordable fossil fuels, the intended use being for portable stoves (propane etc., natural gas, are fossil fuels too).
    sorry for rambling omc
    PS Oh, also on the hill are mature alpha females surviving / thriving, a most fascinating subset of species to gain a better understanding of :content:, there's nothing easy about that. There it maybe: the best things in life don't come easy . Life view is good, bright and sunny (sure the long view will have proverbial wrinkles, carry on :content: )
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2018
  19. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

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    I'm on the way....
    Just had an induction hob fitted.....

    Seriously.looking forward to playing with that baby...
     
  20. Rickybob United Kingdom Banned

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    my feet are wet - forty years old and still a junior house master - they will be calling me mr chips soon
    I must spend the summer in a crammer just to afford a few more stoves - no hols in san moritz for this old duffer!