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Soutter, Birmingham, 1918.

Discussion in 'Other Brands' started by igh371, Jul 18, 2015.

  1. igh371

    igh371 United Kingdom Subscriber

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    This is all about the middle one in this photo:

    DSC02850.JPG

    From this distance it gives an impression of being 1/2 way in-between the 1890s American made No.1 Primus and a 'normal' 2 pint No.1 type. The biggest difference of all is invisible on any photo; that is the weight. Empty, the normal No.1 on the right weighs in at 2lbs (920gms), the Soutter in the middle weighs in at an incredible 5lbs 7oz (3460gms)!!!
    The construction seems to be that the base and sides of the tank have been made as one piece, and the top let in from above. And from the joint on the upper edge surface of the tank is would appear that the tank walls are a full 3/16" thick!! Why?!!
    Everything, even the pump rod end, is heavy weight as can be seen in these detail photos (a standard detachable blow torch pump is added for comparison):

    dsc02859-jpg.133519.jpg dsc02857-jpg.133518.jpg dsc02855-jpg.133517.jpg DSC02861.JPG

    The maker is given as a 'W.Soutter' of Birmingham with the date stamp '7.18', July 1918.

    DSC02860.JPG

    The base has a WD arrow and 'W.H.K.', suggesting that it was made for a military contract.

    DSC02854.JPG

    With supplies of Swedish stoves having been cut off by the unrestricted U-boat campaign of 1917 this is about the same time that Kenrick were producing their 'Aurora' stoves for the British army too. But where does this heavy weight monster fit into the story?

    dsc02869-jpg.133523.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 18, 2015
  2. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    @igh371

    Check the typo on your 1918 date above.

    I guess that stove is indestructible!

    Is that a Primus burner on the (left hand) 1890s stove in the top photo?

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  3. igh371

    igh371 United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi Tony, yes the one on the left is all Primus - like this one of Ross's (https://classiccampstoves.com/threads/primus-no-1-usa.9385/) but not quite so complete or shiny! The old American Primus No.1, however, did have an incuse tank base to take account of the short legs, the Soutter tank base on the other hand bottoms out on the ground! Ian.
     
  4. dave1966 Canada

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    Perhaps if the outpost was being over run by the enemy...the stoves would be used as a lethal weapon......my word that is a heavy piece of kit.....
     
  5. igh371

    igh371 United Kingdom Subscriber

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    A well respected CCS member has pointed out that it looks like shell casing grade brass, and, now I make the comparison, it is indistinguishable in appearance to a 1916 dated shell case I have here in front of me right now. Also suggested that, with the weight and quality, its unlikely to have been issued to ordinary soldiers, so most likely Medical Corps.

    Also info from the net: W.Soutter were a well established Birmingham copper and brassware manufacturers dating from c.1760 and at the address at 359-380 Farm Street from c.1877 until the firm was wound up in 1928. So no surprise at all that they would have been engaged on major war contract work.
     
  6. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    I had thought "Is it made from a cut down shell?" but before typing thought that would be silly but it would be a simple conversion for the maker to get rid of no longer wanted shell casings
     
  7. igh371

    igh371 United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Except this is July 1918, the war was very much still in progress - remember even on the last morning, 11th Nov 1918, there were more casualties than on the whole of D-Day - so shell cases were definately not 'no longer wanted'; but parallel production would cerainly have been fairly simple to organise in a business this large.
     
  8. igh371

    igh371 United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Some additional information regarding the Soutter firm:

    Soutter, W & Sons Ltd
    Farm Street, Birmingham
    Mainly known as art metal workers and manufacturers of electric light and gas fittings. Name also known to have been imprinted on brass plate, soldered to side of Barthel type brazing lamp.
    Trade name: Soutterware
    (source: blowlamps.co.uk)

     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2016
  9. igh371

    igh371 United Kingdom Subscriber

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    A late Victorian meths spirit burner from the same firm hiding elsewhere on CCS - here.
     
  10. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator Subscriber

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    Well spotted, Ian!

    I will move that 'Mystery Stove' to Great Britain.

    I don't know how I missed it back in 2012, because @Jeopardy spotted it back then.