Spirit Cans

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by Twoberth, May 16, 2021.

  1. Twoberth

    Twoberth United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Today I made two more spirit cans, (starting material - two 165ml coconut milk tins).

    2021-05-16 003 002.JPG

    using my recently acquired heat gun (£21 from B&Q). It does a brilliant job once you get used to the heat distribution.

    2021-05-16 003 001.JPG

    Thanks again @Murph for the tip.
     
  2. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Excellent work! They look factory-made.
    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  3. Twoberth

    Twoberth United Kingdom Subscriber

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  4. nmp

    nmp United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    @Twoberth did you make the end caps ?
    I’ve been making one this morning but having the usual problem with blow lamp /soldering iron? Doesn’t the hot air gun give a huge area of heat?
    Nick
     
  5. Twoberth

    Twoberth United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi @nmp
    Yes I made the end caps and pouring spouts.

    First I cut out the inside of the BOTTOM of the coconut milk can with a P38/P51 style can opener so that the rim was left intact. (The bottom of the can is a slightly smaller diameter than the top, so IMHO it looks better when finished.)

    2021-05-16 005 001.JPG

    Then I cut a circle of tinplate slightly larger than the rim and drilled a 10mm hole for the pourer. Next the joint surfaces were fluxed and soldered onto the (emptied and cleaned) tin with the tinplate circle on the bottom of a soldering mat on a lazy Susan turntable. Holding the heat gun in one hand and rotating the table with the other hand, I heated the circumferential joint uniformly until solder wire would run into and around the joint.

    Then I ground the circle flush with the rim.

    The pouring spouts were made as shown here, but soldered on with the heat gun. The heat gun with its restrictor nozzle worked fine, and soldered the pouring nozzle in place without remelting the rim joint.

    Hope this makes sense!
     
  6. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi @Twoberth I recall that the spirit can spouts often share the same dimensions and thread-form with reserve caps:

    Hipolito Spirit-can.

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  7. Twoberth

    Twoberth United Kingdom Subscriber

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    :thumbup: That’s worth knowing. Now bookmarked.
     
  8. nmp

    nmp United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    @Twoberth Thanks for the detailed description.
    I was making mine from scratch as you did the other day.
    I used the heat gun and as you suggested and it works well, I did my soldering on a brazing hearth stone which concentrated the heat even more. unfortunately an error in measurement made the cylinder harder to solder but I got there in the end but still a bit messy the top and bottom caps were fine. I just need to get the plumbing fittings to finish off the two “practice” ones!
    I like the coconut milk can tins you made.
    Cheers Nick