Steel Leningrad Primus No.1. 1930s.

Discussion in 'Russia' started by igh371, Oct 8, 2019.

  1. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    DSC09247.JPG
    1930s steel Leningrad Primus No.1. And when I say steel I mean steel. Steel with UK stoves usually means WW2 steel tank production. But in this case we are not just talking about a steel tank, almost everything is steel; steel filler cap, steel pressure release screw, steel pump tube cap, steel pump rod end, steel spirit cup, in fact the only two things that are not steel are the pump tube itself and the burner!!!
    For a steel tank in particular I think the quality of the embossed detailing is nothing short of superb. Here we see the Primus [Примус] No.1 legends and logo, and the Leningrad [Ленинград] name:
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    The legends on the burner top identify the factory that made this as Cvetmetshtamp [ЦветМетШтамп], and its specific location as Krasnogvardeysk [Красногвардейск] (close to Leningrad). Russian on-line historical resources record the date of the adoption of the Cvetmetshtamp name, replacing an older name (Burevestnik Plant) as having been 1931. They also confirm that these burners were the original equipment on these particular Leningrad Primus', and that production continued there until interrupted by the German invasion of Russia in 1941.
    A different version of the burner, that I have on another example, has the ЦветМетШтамп name presented as an acronym:
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    The main example here cannot ever have had that much use, the protective (nickel?) coating, legs etc all seem to be in remarkably good order as can be seen in the photos above; and it fires up very nicely as would be expected from this observation:

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    @Bratok_xxl
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2019
  2. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Regarding the protective coating which covers every one of the steel components: I have had it suggested that the coating may well be zinc rather than unpolished nickel. This suggestion would seem to be very plausible and probably more likely given the materials most easily available at the time. (Credit to @Bratok_xxl, cпасибо:thumbup:)
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2019
  3. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    That's another fine stove, Ian.

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  4. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

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    Remarkable investigation work there Ian.
     
  5. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    I did have invaluable assistance as you can see acknowledged above,
    Ian:thumbup:
     
  6. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

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    Apologies @Bratok_xxl, my comment was meant to include all your recent efforts with Ian.
     
  7. cottage hill bill

    cottage hill bill Subscriber

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    I too would think zinc. Plating with zinc (called tinning) as opposed to dipping in molten zinc (galvanizing) was a common method of protecting all sorts of metal ware well into the 1970s. When new a tinned item will have a bright shine like chrome plating. The zinc is a sacrificial coating and will oxidize to the dull slightly grainy finish your stove shows now. When new it probably looked like a nickeled stove. Great find.
     
  8. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

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    Zinc is probably the best bet as it's used widely as sacrificial anodes in ship cathodic protection systems, now largely replaced commercially by Impressed Current systems.

    If you have trouble sleeping then this may be of interest.

    Impressed Current Cathodic Protection (ICCP)
     
  9. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    That's a solid stove!