Stove from Romania

Discussion in 'Other Countries' started by keeper_of_the_flame, Feb 13, 2015.

  1. keeper_of_the_flame

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    Although this stove is still filed under Mysteries due to unsolved producer I will present the fettled status here.
    Our good fellow Kristi has done much effort to find out who produced this stove and we are looking forward to solve that mystery in Spring.

    It has got a bit of "futuristic" design that might put it into the late 1960`s.

    1423856038-romania_01.jpg

    It has a "climbing flame" and the system was used with several stoves and heaters like the "Wellstraler" from Belgium. The Kero is floating out of the tank into a reservoir that feeds the pipes - meaning you always have Kero within a more or less "open system" , causing smell. Alas better use it in your summer kitchen.

    1423856219-romania_01_B.jpg

    After complete dismanteling and cleaning I build everything together using new nuts and bolts `cos the old ones were old suty and/or useless.
    Good luck that the main components of the housing are enamelled and the pipes are brass.

    1423856368-romania_02.jpg
    1423856499-romania_03.jpg

    A first lightning showed a good climbing flame within minutes. The wick is an old one I had in store from a wellstraler heater ( asbestos - :evil: ) but else it will be working with a fiberglass wick.

    Now we will see what we can find out about the original manufactorere and I will update then.

    1423856754-romania_04.jpg 1423856762-romania_05.jpg

    Peter
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 27, 2015
  2. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    Do you have the trivets?
     
  3. keeper_of_the_flame

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    Unfortunately not, but they ought to be like those from modern camping stoves - alas, not so difficult to make.
    Peter
     
  4. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    I get the idea Peter, there's a circular well containing an asbestos wick and the kero remains there even when the stove is off. It makes me appreciate the system on my Ditmar Demon which has the same combustion method but the manual pump wets the wick with fuel only at each firing and a thermosyphon arrangement lifts the fuel from the tank when the stove is running.

    How do you extinguish your stove?

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  5. keeper_of_the_flame

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    John, the system is different from the Ditmar Demon one. You have a reservoir ( on pic. 3 the round black pot in the middle of the upper end)that is fed from the tank like the old rippinggale principle. As long as there is Kero in this round box nothing is floating, the lower the reservoir gets it starts feeding again. This round box has pipes leading towards the spindels for each burner. ( pic 4 shows it from underneath). So when you open the spindel fuel will go to the burners - which more or less are round boxes with a wick. When you close the spindel it stops the flow and the wick will burn as long as there is enough fuel in the box. A gravity system with wick. This means that when you start lighting and when you shut off there always is enourmous smell; and you can not use "normal" wicks `cos they will be burned off very fast. So with asbestos or glasfiber is works. But even when the stove is off you will have at least some fuel in the round reservoir beneath the tank. Only possibility to avoid this is to take out the tank and let all fuel go to the burners till they are finished.
    To sum it up. It is possible to use the stove for cooking in summer outside. You must behave similiar to cooking with electric stoves as it will take about 5 to 10 minutes till rest fuel is fired. So to me not a real joy to work with, but a piece of stove technic that was - in several countries at least - quiet common for a while and that`s what made it worth spending 2 days of fettling.
    Peter
     
  6. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    Thank you Peter.

    You summed up the pleasure of repairing and restoring these old stoves very well.

    John
     
  7. kristi

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    Great job, Peter!