Stove Handy Hints

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by kerophile, Dec 19, 2008.

  1. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi, With the approaching Holiday Season, I thought it would be useful if we started a thread where members could pass on a favouite tip , or tips, on the subject of stoves.

    You know the sort of useful tip you were given as a child; like "Don't eat yellow snow".

    Just to kick things off I will offer three:

    1. When maintaining or fettling a stove, use a decent spanner (wrench) of the correct size and thickness. Most of the spanners that come with a stove kit are totally inadequate and will chew up the brass fittings.

    2. The Shinabro burners are attached to their upstands with a left-hand thread and many burners and upstands are damaged in trying to remove the burner in the conventional way.

    3. Silent burner caps are all too easily lost, as you will see from the number of used stoves that are offered without these vital parts.
    Once you have a good set of burner caps on your silent burner, wire tham onto the burner head, using a piece of steel wire. Copper wire melts...I've done the experiment.

    Lets have some more useful tips:

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 6, 2016
  2. Bom Bom Bom Bom

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    If you don't currently have the skills learn how to properly solder and silver solder. Loads of "how to" books are available on the interweb. Get the right torches and practice on scrap metal until you are confident. Also practice disassembly. You will be amazed at the world of additional fettles this opens up for stoves you thought were confined to the scrap heap or display shelf. And remember, when it comes to using solder, less is better.
     
  3. angleofdangle

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    When fettling non-return valves I regularly use chopped down biro pen springs as a replacement. To get leather for making pump washers I buy old handbags from charity shops, but be prepared for some funny looks ! :oops: :D

    Best Regards,
    Alan
     
  4. Big Si

    Big Si Subscriber

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    Stoves by there very nature get HOT and stay HOT, Remember this!! :D :D

    Si
     
  5. Matukat

    Matukat Subscriber

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    AND... it's probably almost always a bad idea to add fuel to a hot stove... :oops: :shock:
     
  6. parramethtrol

    parramethtrol Subscriber

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    on 111's/regulated burners if the graphite packing starts to leak and you have run out of adjustment to tighten it a bit more, remove the nut and add a old inner washer from a previous fettle or very small washer then replace nut and tighten ,this will give you a bit more adjustment to stop the leak,and will work until you can get a replacement graphite packing,
     
  7. Bom Bom Bom Bom

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    If you come across filler caps, pump rod caps etc that you can't remove don't be tempted to reach for the pliers - all you'll do is ruin the knurling on the brass into an unsightly mess.

    One of these is an invaluable part of your stove fettling kit and I've never come across a cap that I can't remove with this and sometimes also a bit of WD40 for a really stubborn one:

    Baby Boa


    Here's another tip. When reassembling threaded components of different metals (e.g. the steel screws that thread into a 111 tank) squirt a very small amout of WD40 into the thread to aid disassembly at a later date. Also use this for any steel threaded parts to delay subsequent rusting.
     
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  8. Jan-Willem

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    Guitar high E strings make perfect material for prickers. They come in different thicknesses for the smallest to the biggest stove.
     
  9. Bom Bom Bom Bom

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    When fettling a stove don't forget to check the inside of the pump tube to ensure it is clear of hard dried gunk and scratches/burrs. Any sharp edges will ruin your brand new pump leather in short order.
     
  10. Bom Bom Bom Bom

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    If you are struggling to insert a new pump leather into the pump tube don't be tempted to rush and jam it in just because you want to get the stove up and running.

    If you are having difficulties ensure the leather is well soaked in olive oil (or whatever is your preferred lubricant) and then install it in the pump tube on the rod back to front.

    Leave it for a couple of days, remove and turn the right way round and you'll find it'll slip straight in with a minimum of fuss.
     
  11. parramethtrol

    parramethtrol Subscriber

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    if your out and about and your tank cap seal starts to leak pressure,get a bit of plastic from a carrier bag stretch across the filler hole make a small hole in the centre of the plastic and then replace cap tightening it down on the plastic bag,this will usually form a seal that will be ok for getting a brew or meal done,if the tank has a separate pressure release you don't need to make the hole in the plastic bag,
    if using a petrol stove with safety release in the cap make sure the bag has the hole or the valve won't be able to release in the event of over pressurisation,once the cap is tight trim excess bag from around the cap to stop it catching fire (unlikely)
     
  12. Bom Bom Bom Bom

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    Here's a handy hint passed onto me from my wife.

    Sell all your stoves and get a life.
     
  13. BernieDawg Banned

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    The slot in the bottom end of an NRV is NOT for a screwdriver blade! Use well padded grips to gently hold the NRV barrel and your NRV removal tool to disassemble the head from the barrel.

    Install lead or copper washers under the head of NRV's before reassembly to make removal easier in the future and insure a good seal.
     
  14. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi, If you are trying to free a particularly stiff burner assembly from a fixed riser tube, such as you have on a No.1 or No.5 stove, don't put all the effort on the burner. It helps if you carefully grip the riser tube in well-padded pipe grips, when you try to turn the burner assembly with a spanner (wrench).
    If the burner still won't shift, try heating it, and then try again whilst the burner is still hot.

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  15. fyldefox

    fyldefox R.I.P.

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    When looking to unscrew items which are tightly done up, try immersing in boiling water first. There is no risk of melting soldered joints, and it works surprisingly often, especially with NRV's . . . wear gloves though !
     
  16. Dutchmike

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    Hardly a Handy Hint, but Mrs. Bom seems to be my kind of woman; cool, observant and probably good for avoiding lots of situations in which one wants to be handy......
     
  17. DAVE GIBSON

    DAVE GIBSON Subscriber

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    all good stuff..however---maybe the post should have another title--"don't make my mistakes" ;)
     
  18. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith Subscriber

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    A simple one I'm finally (but not always) getting to grips with - if it ain't broke, leave the d@mned thing alone... :roll: :oops: :x :doh: ](*,) :-({|=
     
  19. bajabum

    bajabum R.I.P.

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    As a technician, my version is:
    If it ain't broke, Fix it till it is !
     
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  20. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator, R.I.P. Subscriber

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    A rather obvious one . . . . . .

    On stoves such as a 123, 123R, 80, 71, etc., never leave the key on while the stove is lit or you will end up with the famous key burn imprint on your thumb and first finger.