Stoves In Use-The Cooking Thread

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by Cookie, Dec 8, 2019.

  1. Cookie

    Cookie United States Subscriber

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    @Geoff Chirnside Cooking while it is flooding....Without a picture it didn't happen :D/

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  2. Kiwi NZ

    Kiwi NZ Subscriber

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    Thanks Cookie for the photos and info, I will check out whether I can get one in NZ.
    It is a nice bit of kit, always good to have something different.
    The long handle will be useful.
     
  3. Kiwi NZ

    Kiwi NZ Subscriber

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    @Cookie Just seen the photo of the flooding, yes it happened.
     
  4. Cookie

    Cookie United States Subscriber

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  5. Kiwi NZ

    Kiwi NZ Subscriber

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    Wow loved the coverage of the trip, the word intrepid comes to mind.

    That is real life, thankyou for posting it.
     
  6. Vacek

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  7. Robert Bruce

    Robert Bruce SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Such great cooking , such good old and new stoves, makes me wonder what’s out there. There must be some great stoves, let’s see them in action. I think this is the place to have this thread in so the public will see them and get involved.
    Cheers
    Rob
     
  8. Cookie

    Cookie United States Subscriber

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    Headed back to the Sipsey Wilderness. I'll post pics when I return on Sunday. I have three filet mignons waiting for the frying pan.Taking my re-furbushed eleventy-one finally. Temps should be well below freezing in the mornings. I did a pre-test today since it's been a few months since I got her going and of course she took off right away

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    Last edited: Jan 15, 2021
  9. redspeedster

    redspeedster United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Europeans and Brits take note!
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  10. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    $6.99/lb is a great price for filet mignon here, too, for sure. I don't think I've ever seen it that cheap. Usually hereabouts around $12-15 per pound.

    We usually take boneless rib steaks on our backpack trips. On sale here often in the $8-9 per pound range.
     
  11. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr SotM Winner Subscriber

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    I slow broiled a Bison filet a few years ago. Melted in my mouth.
     
  12. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    Ken

    “Broil” is not a word that is used in Australia, and I just looked at two definitions of what it means and they are different. One said to cook something by direct heat from above; the other said to cook by direct heat from above or below. So, I’m none the wiser.

    Can you explain how you browed the bison?

    Cheers

    Tony

    @snwcmpr
     
  13. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    To me 'broil' means by direct heat from above. A typical Yank oven on 'broil' setting will power only the top coils; the meat will be just below and will, consequently, broil.

    Heat only from below we'd call 'grill'. This will take place not in a domestic oven, but over a barbeque with the hot coals below. In a restaurant setting, there will be large commercial grills with various sources of heat below.

    Both are high heat, quick cooking methods. A big difference is that with broiling, fat and juices will drip into the broiling pan upon which the meat rests. It can be discarded, or added a bit to the finished meat. With grilling, it drips and burns.

    Both, of course, are distinct from frying. In the backcountry, on a stove, it's frying alone...
     
  14. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    Ok. I’ll accept that as a functional (USA) definition.

    In Australia we (at least those of us who didn’t see an electric stove until 1975 or so) would usually say heat from above was “grilling”, so we are confounded by the same language.

    Tony

    @Ed Winskill
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2021
  15. redspeedster

    redspeedster United Kingdom Subscriber

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    It's grilling in the UK also. Cooked on a barbeque is barbequed.
    I was told that barbeque in the US is more of a style of food than a method, how true is that?
    Filet mignon isn't a term we use in the UK, and I haven't seen it used in France either in reference to beef steaks.
    I think it's fillet steak here and filet de boeuf in French.
    Anyway Fillet Steak in UK is at least £20+ a kilo most likely £30+
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2021
  16. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr SotM Winner Subscriber

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    I seared the filet on both sides in a very hot cast iron pan.
    Then broiled with electric heat from above.
    The difference was a lower heat, not the full on regular high broil heat.
    Hence, the term slow broil. It was recommended for the leaner Bison filet.
     
  17. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    Filet mignon is more or less a culinary term for the finished product. The beef cut itself is tenderloin. Usually it will be marketed in the store as 'beef tenderloin'.

    The term 'barbeque' in the US has, basically, two meanings. If, in the summer, I tell my wife I'm going to cook two steaks, she might ask, "are you going to broil them [i.e. in the oven] or barbeque them [i.e. outdoors on the barbeque grill]?" Or to the kids, "Come over, I have steaks on the barbeque".

    So that sense is common with the UK, and, I suppose, with Australia.

    The other major sense here is, indeed, a quite different method of cooking: slow cooking with various kinds of 'barbeque' sauces, tomato based but with a great variety of other ingredients, spicy and not. Thus barbequed beef or pork ribs, brisket, etc; slow cooked until the meat is very very tender, often in closed grills with a lot of smoke, slathered with bbq sauce.

    If somebody from Texas was to invite you over for 'barbeque', that's what he'd be talking about....
     
  18. redspeedster

    redspeedster United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Thanks Ed.
    That makes clear, what I had be told previously.
     
  19. Tony Press

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    In Australia “barbecue” means cooking on/in a barbecue; but we also do “barbecue ribs” etc as in the Texas meaning.

    In Australia the “broiling” device (cooking from above) is called a grill or griller and is traditionally in a seperate compartment above the oven and below the hobs.

    Strange thing, language.

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  20. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    The Wiki barbecue article is pretty comprehensive as to all meanings:
    Barbecue - Wikipedia

    As I thought I remembered, the word itself ultimately comes from Caribbean Indian languages.

    Similarly with Buccaneer...