Svea 106 Standard Oil

Discussion in 'Svea No:106' started by igh371, Dec 13, 2013.

  1. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Posting photos of this Svea 106 on the Gallery in hope that it's more unusual features may draw out some knowledgeable additional comments!

    1386931899-DSC00481_opt__1_.jpg


    I notice that none of the other '106's on Gallery at moment have the old 'Sievert' starburst logo which is on this one:
    1386968712-1386952422-DSC00488_opt.jpg

    1386968718-1386952451-DSC00487_opt.jpg

    1386968724-1386952472-DSC00486_opt.jpg



    Other features possibly relevant to dating are the classic Svea dimpled spirit cup and tank bottom stamp: 1386968734-1386952619-DSC00491_opt.jpg

    1386968741-1386952642-DSC00490_opt.jpg


    And then there is the pan ring. This is embossed with the name of the Standard Oil Company. I know Svea and others later made fully customised promotional stoves for oil companies, but there is a difference here to others I have seen in that in this case only the pan ring is customised. There is good reason to believe that this ring has always been with the stove and both are in remarkably good condition. The stove doesn't show any signs of much use and even less of ever having been outdoors.

    1386968729-1386952602-DSC00484_opt.jpg


    The Standard Oil Company was broken up by anti-trust legal action in the US in 1911, but some of the successor entities seem to have inherited rights to continue using the name in some contexts and jurisdictions. So that definitely does not date the stove that early - so, taking all the various features and factors together, what sort of era could it date from?
     
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  2. Wim

    Wim Subscriber

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    Hi igh, I can only see one of your photo's, the others are merely a question mark. Anyhow, this is a very nice 106! I still have to fettle its silent brother, bought a few years ago (shame on me! [-X ). The Standard Oil Co lived on for many years, and later changed into the ESSO company, now EXXON. (Standard Oil in short is S-O so it was not much of a surprise S-O turned into ESSO). I'll have to take a look, but I think my example was made for the S-O Co., like a few SVEA N°5s I have. These stoves were made for the french (with french & arabic text) and the belgian market (with text in french & flemish) promoting the use of S-O paraffin. I have no scientific proof but I think these were made in the 1930s. Sadly, I have no trivets :cry: .

    Best regards,

    Wim
     
  3. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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  4. Wim

    Wim Subscriber

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    Just had a close look at my N°105, it has the french/arabic text on it so was meant for France and its colonies. As far as I know, the "SVEA" branded ones have brass pot stand holders, while mine has steel ones. So, I think there was some quality difference. In fact, I think the S-O N°5s (sold under the name "Trois Etoilles) are really based on the cheaper SVEA N°15 (budget model, using thinner brass for its construction. One of my Trois Etoilles is very badly stress-cracked as well as my SVEA N°15. They both have the same "feel" weight wise but I should really check this on an electronic scale).

    Best regards,

    Wim
     
  5. Murph

    Murph United States Subscriber

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    EXONN has the rights to use ESSO or Standard Oil internationally, but in the US, it uses it only in certain states, in other states, Chevron or Amaco retain the rights to "Standard Oil" as their trademark.This is all due to a anti-trust suit here in the US many years ago.

    "Of the 34 "Baby Standards", 11 were given rights to the Standard Oil name, based on the state they were in. Conoco and Atlantic elected to use their respective names instead of the Standard name, and their rights would be claimed by other companies.

    By the 1980s, most companies were using their individual brand names instead of the Standard name, with Amoco being the last one to have widespread use of the "Standard" name, as it gave Midwestern owners the option of using the Amoco name or Standard.

    Currently, three supermajor companies own the rights to the Standard name in the United States: ExxonMobil, Chevron Corp., and BP. BP acquired its rights through acquiring Standard Oil of Ohio and Amoco, and has a small handful of stations in the Midwestern United States using the Standard name. Chevron has one station in each state it owns the rights to branded as Standard except in Kentucky, which it withdrew from in July 2010. ExxonMobil keeps the Esso trademark alive at stations that sell diesel fuel by selling "Esso Diesel" displayed on the pumps. ExxonMobil has full international rights to the Standard name, and continues to use the Esso name overseas."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_Oil

    Murph
     
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  6. idahostoveguy

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    That is a fabulous looking Svea 106. The Sievert explosion logo looks so great on these oldies. The older the stoves in the Sievert history the better the engravings and more of it!

    Thanks for getting the pics displaying properly.

    sam
     
  7. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi Ian , just came back to this post of your stove and was giving it some thought.
    I reckon this Svea 106 dates from the 1930s

    The characteristic early features which you have illustrated are:

    1. The "starburst" Sievert logo on the tank top.
    2. The large "SVEA" script used on the tank.
    3. The much smaller script used for the " No. 106" on the tank
    4. The dimpled spirit cup.
    5. The SVEA-CBEA marking on the top of the roarer burner. This style was used up until WW2, I believe.

    Have a look at this post of a Svea No.105 from the 1930s:

    https://classiccampstoves.com/threads/14442

    Is it similar to your stove?

    The pan ring of your stove is marked "STANDARD OIL" but it is a classic and unique SVEA pattern.

    What do you think?
    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
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