Svea 14 c.1915 silent tube burner

Discussion in 'Svea No:14' started by igh371, Sep 3, 2015.

  1. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    DSC03172.JPG

    The Svea 14 is the silent burner twin to the ungainly Svea 12 roarer. So in terms of Svea silent burners the '14' was to the No.4 what the '15' was to the No.5, i.e. "the lighter pattern of somewhat thinner sheet brass" (1915 cat.). As with the case of the roarer No.12, however, this 'lighter pattern' option was bizarrely only available with a 2 pint tank, which is nearly double the size of the tank of the true No.4 :?. This one has the rare original 'No.4' specification version of the Svea tubular silent burner:

    DSC03166.JPG DSC03167.JPG DSC03168.JPG

    This version of the Svea tubular silent burner is a peculiar size. Obviously it has the smaller bore tubes that one would expect on a No.4 burner (c/f the heavier No.5 equivalent). The burner head, however, is heavier than a 'normal' No.4-type silent burner, the o/d of the outer skirt is the same 65mm, but the inner cap diameter is 42mm as opposed to 40mm on a normal No.4. (The equivalent dimensions on the No.5 version are outer skirt o/d 90mm and inner cal diameter 45mm) The inner cap also requires a spigot to fit into the base, and finally this tubular No.4 burner utilises a standard jet (0.32mm) as opposed to the smaller 0.23mm jet found on most No.4s (ref.). All of this caused a few headaches in the fabrication of viable replacements for the missing inner and outer top caps. The inner was created from triple sleeving, 3 different lengths & diameters required, a form of No.5 inner cap, and the top cap from sacrificing an outer flame spreader from a No.10 stove. This will all make sense if you study the 3 photos above, and the 4 below:

    DSC03169.JPG DSC03182.JPG DSC03185.JPG DSC03187.JPG
    (operating instructions for this type of silent burner can be found at).

    The rest of the stove is all standard for an external-NRV Svea of the period:
    DSC03170.JPG DSC03171.JPG DSC03173.JPG DSC03190.JPG DSC03174.JPG DSC03175.JPG DSC03177.JPG DSC03179.JPG


    DSC03191.JPG
     
  2. z1ulike

    z1ulike United States SotM Winner Subscriber

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    They don't make 'em like that anymore! Beautiful stove and a beautiful presentation. Thanks
     
  3. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    Hi Ian,

    This is a wonderful old SVEA and great to see it in full glory, as you have so well shown it here! Well done, Mate, and thanks, very much, for sharing this with everyone!! The older SVEA stoves are amongst my most favorite, and have been since I got my very first one. Thanks, again, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  4. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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  5. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator, R.I.P. Subscriber

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    This is a really interesting stove that I have been fortunate to see 'in the flesh'.
    Ian, you did a great job of making a cap for the silent burner.

    In searching for information for another stove, I came across some patents for Svea stoves from Max Sievert and C.R. Nyberg (company history is here).

    The first is from 1909 and is for an ingenious auto-lighter for the Svea silent burner.
    I have never seen an auto-lighter like this and maybe it was never put into production.
    But the lighter is shown on a burner that is the same as yours, with the 'snake' burner tubes.

    Siev-Nyberg_1909.jpg

    Full patent is here.


    Next, I came across a 1910 patent by Nyberg for your auto-lighter.
    The patent shows a slightly less deep 'well', but production often saw slight changes from the original patent drawings.
    The lighter is shown on a simplified bottom part of a burner, but even so it looks to be a snake burner.

    Nyberg_1910.jpg Sv4_AutoLight.jpg

    The full patent is here.



    Finally I found a 1918 patent by Nyberg showing the pump arrangement with an external Non Return Valve.
    I think it is more concerned about a change to the components at the bottom of the pump rod.

    Nyberg_1918.jpg

    The full patent is here.
     
  6. VicS

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    Kudos!!!
     
  7. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Excellent additional information Trevor. Interesting that the 1908 catalogue does not contain any form of auto-lighter, and that the oldest operating instructions we have which do show an auto-lighter are dated March 1911, just over a year after the date of this patent. All seems to fit together quite nicely.
     
  8. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    Greetings, Ian, Trevor, and All,

    I just found one of these excellent stoves, too, and thank the both of you for piecing together the information that supports the seller's contention that it dates circa 1910! Also, Ian, thanks for your skillful work on the inner and outer caps, I can see what is in store for me, and what is needed to make mine whole again, as mine, too, is missing the inner and outer caps. Excellent work, my friend! Thanks, Trevor, for your perfect detective work, too. Much appreciated. Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Mark
     
  9. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    @igh371 ,

    Hi, Ian!

    I really appreciate your continuing flow of information on this stove! I'm still a bit perplexed on how you cobbled together the inner burner cap. Do you have photos of the bits going together, in sequence? I've not tried my hand at brazing as of yet, but that's what it appears that you did in order to create the inner cap for this very old and very unique burner!! YIKES!! Any chance I could commission you to make one of the inners for me? No worries if this would not work out, just thought I'd ask about it. Talk to you soon, and as always, God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  10. igh371

    igh371 SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi Doc,

    Not as difficult as you might imagine. What you see above was my first attempt at one of those burners. No brazing involved. For the inner the base is one of those low height Indian made No.5 size inner caps. Next to source is a short length of brass tube, diameter to give an easy sliding fit through the burner body base plate. And finally, for this most basic cobble-together, a couple of even shorter pieces of larger diameter brass tubing chosen to be filed or turned down to an interference fit to hold the center spigot tube neatly centered in the Indian inner. A better quality spigot assembly could be made by turning and boring the whole in one piece from a suitable section of brass bar. I have never got round to doing that because the cobble-together works, and there are always more jobs waiting:D.

    An outer top cap can be made either from a Primus No.10/No.25 outer as here, or by sourcing a suitable size engine core plug as I have done subsequently on the larger version of this type of burner.

    Ian:thumbup:


    @Doc Mark
     
  11. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    Happy New Year, Ian!!!!

    Thanks for the additional information. I'll start looking for one of those low height Indian made No.5 size inner caps, and go from there. I'll take it slow and easy, and see what happens!! Many thanks, once again, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc