Svea 5 tank / riser tube connection

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by Huub, Nov 27, 2020.

  1. Huub Netherlands

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    svea 5 overview.JPG burner.JPG tank mount 1.JPG tank mount 2.JPG riser tube 1.JPG

    First of all: many thanks for the excellent information on this forum and the very friendly atmosphere. Much appreciated!

    I'm working on a Svea 5. When I tried to disconnect the burner from the riser tube to replace the washer, the riser tube disconnected from the tank. I noticed two things:

    1. There are several "slits" or "indentations" in the threads on the tank
    2. there is silvery looking substance on the threads, like it had been soft-soldered. Or is this some old school leak-tight substance?

    I have some questions:

    1. Any advice on detaching the riser tube from the burner without damaging the riser tube? The tube is quite thin and looks like it is easily damaged
    2. When reconnecting the riser tube to the tank, do I just screw it on untill tight, or do I need to take special action like soldering?

    Thanks in advance and best regards,

    Huub svea 5 overview.JPG
     
  2. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi @Huub

    Undo burner from riser tube:

    Hi, If you are trying to free a particularly stiff burner assembly from a fixed riser tube, such as you have on a No.1 or No.5 stove, don't put all the effort on the burner. It helps if you carefully grip the riser tube in well-padded pipe grips, when you try to turn the burner assembly with a spanner (wrench).
    If the burner still won't shift, try heating it, and then try again whilst the riser is still hot.


    Riser tube detachment:

    How to save your Optimus 00?

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2020
  3. Huub Netherlands

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    Hi Kerophile,

    Thanks for your fast reply. I've read the thread about saving the Optimus 00, this has made clear how the feed tube is connected to the tank. I'm still unsure about the re-attachment of the riser tube to the feed tube. Would your advice be to screw it on and then apply heat and some additional (soft) solder to the joint?

    regards, Huub
     
  4. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi @Huub Yes, Because the threads are already coated with solder I think that is the best option.
    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  5. Huub Netherlands

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    My Svea 5 is up and running, but only after some fettling :-)

    The major challenge was to disconnect the riser tube from the burner head. Sadly I had to go medieval on the poor thing - meaning large pliers, copious amounts of heat by blowtorch, accompanied by a well-timed tap with a hammer. In the end it gave up its resistance and came loose with a very satisfying "screeeeeech". As you can see in the picture there was some collateral damage to the riser tube.....

    The next phase was removing the washer from the burner head, and then it became clear why the whole assembly was almost welded together. Propably a (misguided) previous owner had replaced the original calmonite washer by a steel one..... and this was badly corroded, effectively glueing the burner head to the riser tube. The picture below is the washer after some serious cleaning with sandpaper.

    After cleaning the parts I followed @kerophile 's advice. The riser tube was firmly screwed into place and the visible parts of the joint meticulously cleaned. The area I didn't want to become contaminated with solder was treated with permanent marker.

    A wet towel was tied around the tank to prevent the legs falling of, some flux, fingers crossed and the blowtorch! After a minute or so I suddenly saw the existing solder between tank and riser tube becoming fluid and it looked like it formed a nice seal. I decided to leave it at that - additional solder was not necessary.

    After the usual fettling (seals, burner cleaning, NRV refurbishing, pump leather) it was time for assembly and test-firing. As you can see the flame is a bit orange, but it is definitely not yellow and not sooting. This was without an inner cap for the silent burner - I have to order one. However, even without the inner cap the burner performs quite well.

    The stove is clearly not show-quality, but it will be used at home for melting bees wax - bees and honey keep me busy in spring and summer.

    Special thanks to kerophile - without your encouragement I would probably not have unleashed the blowtorch :-)

    Happy 2021!

    Huub


    flame shot 1.JPG flameshot 2.JPG overview.JPG overview1.JPG riser tube.JPG washer (1).JPG
     
  6. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi @Huub I am so pleased that you have your classic Svea No.5 stove repaired and operating again.
    Svea made beautiful and functional stoves and your model looks good for another 50 years or so.
    Well Done!
    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  7. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi @Huub . I was just looking in Reference Gallery and I believe that your stove looks similar to this example:

    Svea No.5 from around 1960 *

    What do you think?

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  8. Huub Netherlands

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    Hi @kerophile, the tank looks exactly the same; steel legs with the distinguishing feet. I can't see the pump shaft in your pictures but mine is steel.

    The burner however is different in many aspects. The saucer on top in yours looks intact; mine is marked "Svea" on the outside and is dotted with holes from which little flakes protrude downward. And then the spirit cup is also different: mine has the extra small reservoir. The burner cap in my example is not marked (or the markings have not withstood many years of service), in yours the markings are clearly visible.

    The steel washer between burner head and riser tube points to some fettling in its history, so maybe it is a compound stove in which the burner was replaced. Sadly I have no history of this stove. When I obtained it, there was no obvious difference in age between the parts - everything was "crusty".

    1960's might be a good guess, I think that especially the steel pump shaft points to a not so distant past.

    Regards, Huub