Svea No:16 1930s

Discussion in 'Svea No:16' started by kerophile, Jun 18, 2009.

  1. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Svea 16 from the 1930s.

    Hi, here are some photos of a Svea No.16 from the late 1920s/Early 1930s.
    Svea still used external NRVs on this, and its sister, as shown in the 1937 catalogue.
    The Svea 16 is the roarer sister of the Svea No.15, these stoves are otherwise identical:

    1245341347-St.68.-Svea-16-1..jpg 1245341382-St.68.-Svea-16-2.jpg 1245341408-St.68.-Svea-16-3.jpg 1245341430-St.68.-Svea-16-4.jpg 1245341469-St.68.-Svea-16-5.jpg

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  2. hikin_jim

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    A very good looking stove. Did you do a bit of fettleing on it? Everything appears to be in excellent repair.

    "The Svea 16 is the roarer sister of the Radius No.15"

    So, I'm a bit ignorant on this point: did Radius and Svea have some type of relationship? It's hard to keep track of when Primus was Primus and not Optimus and was Svea by Sievert, etc.
     
  3. Wim

    Wim Subscriber

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    I sometimes wonder to what extend all the different makes are connected to each other! Apart from a different text on the fuel container there is often very little difference between them.

    Regards,

    Wim
     
  4. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi Jim, My mistake. I meant to type Svea 15 NOT Radius 15!!!!

    I was so excited with all the stove firing today, ...I even made my Turkish coffee on my "Russian Touristy", that I mistook two of the excellent Swedish Manufacturers.

    There was no formal relationship, that I know of between Radius and Max Sievert (Svea).

    Both Cos. made excellent stoves, blowlamps and lanterns.

    I did of course fettle the Svea No.16, when I first acquired it in 2005. It was about 80 years old and it had been used.....!

    Did you notice that this stove uses an external NRV. Much easier to get at than the later ones which they buried at the base of the pump-tube!

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  5. hikin_jim

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    Wim: Sometimes it does look as if all of the manufacturers took pages out of each other's playbooks, doesn't it?

    Kero: OK, that clears that up. I didn't think that there was any relationship between Radius and Svea/Max Sievert. Sometimes it gets a bit confusing as to exactly who was making a particular stove when.

    I did notice the valve. It does seems like a very practical place to to put it. I rather loathe items built in such a way as to make them almost unmaintainable. I even more dislike items that are built in such a way that one must replace an entire "module" or unit rather than merely replacing a single part... but don't get me started on that subject. :) On older stoves, there was an assumption that ordinary people would need to maintain them with ordinary tools. It seems that the fine art of simplicity is lost on modern manufacturers.
     
  6. hydro451

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    Hi Kerophile and all,
    Very nice stove and I particularly like that
    style trivet , they look so modern to be so old.

    Cheers Tom
     
  7. sefaudi

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    Hey George,

    Would you please post one more photo here after you dismantle the nut seen on the 3rd photo.

    I reckon there should be an access point to NRV but am not sure.
     
  8. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi Sefa, I don't want to dismantle the NRV. I have seen many of this early design before.

    Check out the diagrams on page 12 of this 1908 Svea Catalogue and you will see the arrangement:

    https://classiccampstoves.com/threads/8742

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  9. Alan

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    Excuse my ignorance but is there a burner cap to change a 15 roarer to a 16 silent? If so would it fit the 210/00 or the 45 stoves?

    Alan
     
  10. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi Alan, it is simply a matter of exchanging burners. Both silent and roarer burners of equivalent power share the same thread form and diameter, so fit on the stove riser.
    2 pint capacity stoves use the same burners as the 1.75 pint capacity, collapsible stoves , such as an Optimus 45 and its silent sister the Op.48.
    One pint stoves, such as the Primus 210 and equivalents from other makers use physically smaller burners.

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  11. Alan

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    Got it. Thanks.
    How many pints is the SVEA 15?
    Do you know what burner a Radius 15 could use and where I could find one? I'm considering getting this tank. image.jpg

    Thanks again

    Alan
     
  12. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi, Svea 15 and 16 have a tank capacity of around 2 pints.

    The Radius 15 looks to have a tank size of around 1.75 pints.

    https://classiccampstoves.com/threads/radius-no-15-brass-late-1950s.27870/

    Fettle box can supply a suitable silent ( as original would have been) or roarer burner, plus Heat-resistant washers for the Radius15 tank you show.

    Base Camp can provide a suitable riser tube and spirit cup. You will also need a set of 3 legs to fit it.

    Generally it is cheaper to buy a complete stove than tank plus spare parts.

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2016
  13. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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  14. Alan

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    Thanks Kero.

    I was told that the nut outside the nrv acts as a governor that will dictate the flame height and that it is adjustable throughout the burn by finger.
    Is this true? You said it has to be kerosene tight which doesn't sound like it needs any adjusting other than tightening.

    I have a SVEA 16 on its way!
     
  15. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi, the outer nut on the early stoves with external NRV have to be kerosene tight. Once the NRV pip is installed the outer cover/nut is tightened and that is it.

    The power of the stove is adjusted by either increasing or decreasing the air pressure in the tank. You pump to increase pressure, and use the air inlet valve to reduce pressure.
    The tank should never be more than 3/4 filled with kerosene. The ballast volume of air above the liquid allows the system to be kept under pressure in use.

    Best Regads,
    Kerophile.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2016
  16. Ray123

    Ray123 Subscriber

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    Alan.
    Once you open it you'll see it's quite simple. Here's a pic:

    100_1095.JPG
     
  17. Alan

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    Kero,

    Thanks for the explanation and the picture. That makes sense to me.

    This is the email I was sent prior to buying the stove which was made in 1915. The guy who restored it was great to correspond with and very knowledgable and wouldn't suprise me if he's on the forum. . This is what he wrote:

    "First after you start the Stove then you use the nut to set the flame. You can Pump after and it will just go back to the way you first set it. The Vent will lower the flame. But to increase on a Permeant basis you have to tighten the nut slightly then Pump and it will stay ay that setting. If you pump more it will get higher for a few seconds then go back to the setting you had set with the nut.
    The Nut is Like an engine Governor it gets set and that is the speed that it will run as. if you Pump ( pust the Gas ) it will roar but go bact to the way it is set. You can lower by the vent but if you re-pump it will go back to the last setting."

    Have you ever heard of this? Guess I'll know more once I get the stove and fettle around a bit. I'll keep you posted and include pics next time around.

    Thanks again,
    Alan
     
  18. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    @Alan

    I will defer to others who have had dealings with that form of NRV, but the account in your post above does not seem correct to me, unless the stove was only ever filled to below the NRV, and the NRV was set to release air at a particular pressure. I'm sure it was not designed to do this.

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  19. Alan

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    Thanks Tony

    That makes sense. Time will tell when I get the stove. Here are some pics from the seller. Got a really good deal!

    Alan

    image.jpg image.jpg








    image.jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2016
  20. Ray123

    Ray123 Subscriber

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    The nut is simply housing for the spring and to provide easy access to the valve.
    The flame is controlled as George explains above by increasing or decreasing pressure same as with internal NRV stoves.

    Plenty of info on external NRV's is provided here on the site such as this post.