Svea

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by Roger mancini, Aug 23, 2020.

?

Parrafin or kerosene

  1. Any

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. All

    2 vote(s)
    100.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Roger mancini Guernsey

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2020
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Guernsey
    Hi there. I have an svea no 5 stove. I lit it for the first time today. The top of the tank gets really hot. I guess this is usual but, I just wondered. Am I right in thinking that parrafin is better than kerosene because its cleaner?
     
  2. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    10,686
    Location:
    Tacoma, Washinghton, USA
    Paraffin and kerosene are one and the same, though grades of each may vary.
     
  3. Lennart F Sweden

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2017
    Messages:
    915
    Location:
    Vänersborg, Sweden
    There is something called paraffin oil or n-paraffin mainly used in wick burners indoors because it smells less but also tend to crystalize at low temperatures.
    British paraffin use to be what most people use in their "kerosene" stoves and lamps - especially the pressure ones.
    British kerosene is a slightly heavier fraction and seem to have its name from the american war supplies and is probably similar to the cheapest american kerosene.

    Conclusion is that it takes more details to answer what is what and therefore we try to use the american lamp kerosene of good quality as reference to minimize international confusion.
     
  4. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    10,686
    Location:
    Tacoma, Washinghton, USA
    Yes, what here is called K-1 kerosene, water-clear, refined for the indoor portable heater market probably originally.
     
  5. Roger mancini Guernsey

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2020
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Guernsey
    Thanks for your replies and info about the fuel. I realise there are many grades of parrafin and kerosene, some more refined than others. I think this can vary from country to country. I filled it with citronella lamp oil because I wanted to see if it worked. I will get some parrafin and try that tomorrow. The other point was the fuel tank getting really hot at the top. As I've said, I've never used one before. Is this normal?
     
  6. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    10,686
    Location:
    Tacoma, Washinghton, USA
    Hot tank is not a problem.

    While kerosene stoves have pumps because the fuel is much less volatile that petrol (many petrol stoves are without pumps because the fuel when hot will self-pressurize the stove), they still can get hot to the point that, especially in the smaller models, they will often self-pressurize, too.

    There's a lot of heat conducted down to the tank and this is normal. Over-self-pressurizing of a kero stove is not generally a worry at all.
     
  7. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2013
    Messages:
    6,958
    Location:
    Stinkpot Bay, Howden, Tasmania, Australia
    @Roger mancini

    Make sure you purge your stove of the citronella lamp oil. It will carbonise your burner and clog your jet. When you get some kerosene (paraffin), give it a good burn for 20 minutes or so.

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  8. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    14,733
    Location:
    North Carolina
    What is the poll question supposed to mean?
     
  9. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    10,686
    Location:
    Tacoma, Washinghton, USA
    It's relevance has receded, I expect.
     
  10. Yun¹²⁴ Korea, Republic of

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2020
    Messages:
    35
    Location:
    Gangnam, Seoul in Korea
    Hello, whatever they're called, Kerosine(Kerosene) should have these specifications around; Flash point: around 38'C, Ignition around 220'C, Specific gravity around 0.8 so that's the Kerosene. You can spefify above details from the MSDS that you can get from the fuel supplier, seller.
    It's lighter and cleaner than Diesel, and similar as the Jet fuel for aviations.
    I don't think the vegi Citronella oil would be very suitable for the Kero stoves, but it's only my personal opinion.
     
  11. Lennart F Sweden

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2017
    Messages:
    915
    Location:
    Vänersborg, Sweden
    Some small kerosene stoves will normally self pressurize in warm weather to that extent that they need some pressure release repeated quite often to maintain a slow boil - most No:1 or 5 sized stoves use to self stabilize pressure by the heat feedback at room temperature.

    Most vegetable oils leaves considerable amounts of soot and coke when vapourizing - even clogging wicks causing the need to clean and trim wicks all the time - that's why I prefer a good and clean kerosene or other petroleum based fuel in all my burners including Peugeot 307 HDI:-k:idea::-k
     
  12. Lennart F Sweden

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2017
    Messages:
    915
    Location:
    Vänersborg, Sweden
    I don't use petroleum fuel in my spirit burners of course:lol:
     
  13. Roger mancini Guernsey

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2020
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Guernsey
    I dont think the citronella lamp oil is vegetable, it's clear and is designed for wick burners having said that, it seems to work very well for the time being, I'll get the proper stuff when I'm in the uk next week. I posted another thread about an old buflam no 2 stove I found. The burner cap and spreader from the svea seem to fit very well so, if I can get another burner set, I can get the bug working. Does anyone see any problems with this plan?
     
  14. Roger mancini Guernsey

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2020
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Guernsey
    Can I use red diesel in these stoves?
     
  15. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2009
    Messages:
    5,585
    Location:
    Christchurch NZ
    Citronella lamp oil is a scented heavy lamp oil designed for wick torches. It burns with a very yellow flame and keeps bugs away. (in theory) I tried burning some in a primus5 and spent the next 2 hours cleaning jets etc. It will get you out of trouble but not a regular fuel. Simularly diesel will burn but it will burn yellow and clog the burners. Red diesel stains everything
     
  16. Yun¹²⁴ Korea, Republic of

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2020
    Messages:
    35
    Location:
    Gangnam, Seoul in Korea
    Citronella oil is not suitable fuel for the svea n.5 stove that I strongly believe. it's for the not-pressurized-lamps.
    Diesel for vehicles is not okay neither, it has too much additional chemicals, no reason to fill it up instead of Kerosine.
     
  17. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2013
    Messages:
    6,958
    Location:
    Stinkpot Bay, Howden, Tasmania, Australia
    Dear @Roger mancini

    Please read above. Your citronella oil may work for a bit... but it will eventually, in not so long time, clog your burner.

    Tony
     
  18. Roger mancini Guernsey

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2020
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Guernsey
    Thanks guys. Citronella was all I had. I googled the question, which is best, paraffin or kerosene, the answer was paraffin because its cleaner and more refined, what are your views? I'm told kerosene is much cheaper but, I'm not sure where to get it. Paraffin used to be quite common but now, it seems only b&q have it.
     
  19. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2013
    Messages:
    6,958
    Location:
    Stinkpot Bay, Howden, Tasmania, Australia
    @Roger mancini

    Before you get inundated with confusing information, you need to specify where you intend to buy the fuel. If you were buying it in the UK your best advice would be from someone there.

    But... the British word for kerosene is paraffin.

    If you are buying from somewhere else, let us know.

    Tony
     
  20. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    10,686
    Location:
    Tacoma, Washinghton, USA
    Paraffin and kerosene are the same thing, as has been stated several times.

    The Brit term historically was paraffin. The North American term was kerosene.

    To ask which is better, is like asking which is better, "white gas" or "Coleman fuel"? They are the same thing.

    It's perfectly true that there are different grades of paraffin/kerosene, so that one may encounter a poor grade of 'paraffin' and compare it to a higher grade of 'kerosene'. But as far as the generic term is concerned, apart from questions of gradations-- they are the same.

    So to answer your specific question, which is better, the answer is: neither- they are the same.

    Just be sure when you buy the stuff you buy a high grade. In the US, this is "K-1"; what the Brit grades are I don't know.