Swedish Army Jagerkok

Discussion in 'Optimus No:91' started by Twodogs, Jun 30, 2010.

  1. Twodogs

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    Issued to Swedish Army Rangers working in the far north ,
    The Jagerkok

    1277882680-2010_0124wolf0053.JPG 1277882700-2010_0124wolf0054.JPG |imgRemoved|'thumb' 1277882822-2010_0124wolf0057.JPG

    The 1 litre fuel bottle was issued as well as the smaller bottle that was carried on the soldier to keep some meths warm for preheating .
    using the carry strap on the pan as a lid lifter is a nice touch told to me by an ex-Swedish soldier , nice touch ;) ,
    All mine are a mix or years of manufacture
    I guess they were stored in unit store a bit like this,

    1277883070-2010_0124wolf0056.JPG

    There's Svea, Optimus, and L&L stamped on some of the pans but no markings on the windsheild,

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    The burners are a mix too,
    Early Svea (push on lid is missing),

    1277883364-2010_0124wolf0003.JPG 1277883393-2010_0124wolf0002.JPG

    Trangia,
    smaller burner holes and the lid's different ,

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    Sveas ,

    1277883578-2010_0124wolf0016.JPG

    HP burner made in 1988,

    1277883689-2010_0124wolf0009.JPG 1277883723-2010_0124wolf0010.JPG

    That's all I can find about this solid little storm cookers with loads of history.

    Any more info would be good.

    Cliff
     
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  2. itchy

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    Thanks for all the pics. The strap handle is a great idea -- got to try that.

    I have accumulated several of these (style) kits, all made for the military size burner. One included the Svea burner you show with the push on friction lid -- and I had assumed (incorrectly it seems) it was a civilian-only version. The lid, by the way, lacks an o-ring, so it was obviously not meant to contain fuel. Two, had screw down lids with full turns of the threading, as opposed to the quick-jam threading common on the military burners (I like the military version better). One had no burner. I doubt any of mine were ever issued to the military so they lack the historical interest (although, one came via Canada wrapped in a Swedish news paper from 1961), but still they are good kits.

    Judging from what I have read here, recent kits of this style all use the smaller Trangia burner. I know the newest ones must all be made in Asia, but I wonder if any of the Swedish kits ever used the smaller Trangia burner?
     
  3. rik_uk3

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  4. Twodogs

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    Itcy repost you pictures here there in the gallery then :) .
    Rik I have a Claus Olsen clone and it is close the the burners a bit naff but a cracking price £9.99 :D/
     
  5. hikin_jim

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    Interesting that they would issue this kit to those operating in the far north. Alcohol stoves have the reputation of not working well in extreme cold weather. Of course, having a "storm cooker" type set up would be a big advantage.

    HJ
     
  6. itchy

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    Reputations may or may not be deserved sometimes ;) .

    There was a discussion a while back about how the serious dog sled competition folks are using big multi-burner alcohol stoves because they find them more dependable and easier than the Coleman two burners they used to carry. As I remember, they used a large 5 gal bucket, with holes around the bottom, then there were several burners consisting of tin cans stuffed with TP and filled with yellow heet gas-line antifreeze. A large pot of a smaller diameter than the bucket, but with handles, would be suspended inside over the burners. Essentially a just a big version of of of these or the trangia.
     
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  7. rik_uk3

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    Alcohol stove do in fact work in the cold, once lit and warmed a little they perform OK. The stoves used by many sledge mushers in the Arctic to heat lots of food and water for themselves and their dogs burn alcohol.
     
  8. Eustacius

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    My first post on the forum. A little late to reply on this. Sorry...

    I did 15 months paid "vacation" 1992-1993, in the north and half of that time I ate what I cooked on one of those. They are not used anymore so I suppose they can be bought dirt cheap.

    A couple of comments. Alcohol isn't the best fuel in the cold but, as someone else wrote, as soon as it gets warmed up a bit it burns a little to well. (See below.) One is advised at times to keep the burner and the alcohol close to the body. Hard to do, but I have been able to work it in fairly cold conditions so it shouldn't be necessary.

    There is a difference from burner to burner. If there has been water in the burner the metal wool can be corroded. I'm not sure about this but I was taught that there is steel wool inside.

    The stove is known as "single user stove, ranger" (enmanskök, jägare) as opposed to the simpler and a lot worse "single user stove".

    I didn't know there was a lid for the burner with the large holes and the sloped sides. We just called it the "winter burner" since it was a lot easier to light in the cold (sometimes 30-40 below) and burned a lot hotter. (We kind of fancied a good burn since the only water source was snow...) We just put enough alcohol ("sprit 35") in it for one use. However (and a big one), since it was harder to put out without a dedicated lid, it shone like the day when one removed the pot, and one could see it many kilometers away. Not a good thing if you're supposed to do intelligence and sabotage behind the enemy lines.

    BTW I have never gotten that lid to work. If kept in the stove with alcohol in it, the food gets a nice seasoning with whatever additives are in the fuel. Impossible to remove in the snow...

    Have fun with it. There is a gas burner for it as well.

    Regards,
    Chris

    PS It rattles a lot in the backpack. Half a roll of loo paper fixes that. ;)