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Tilley T-Up (tea-up)

Discussion in 'Tilley' started by presscall, Aug 3, 2012.

  1. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Boxed and unused, it's described on the box as an LP gas boiling ring ...

    1344026582-1.JPG


    ... but with the slogan "For people who get about" it surely has pretensions to be a camp stove ...

    1344026774-17.JPG


    ... though even with a 901 Campingaz refillable cylinder (901 small, 904 medium, 907 large) it's not for backpacking

    1344026592-2.JPG


    Solid construction - very Tilley

    1344026600-3.JPG

    1344026610-4.JPG

    1344026618-5.JPG


    Jet nipple has a gauze filter built in, but butane's a clean source, so probably unnecessary

    1344026626-6.JPG


    Base doesn't unscrew

    1344026634-7.JPG


    It dates from 1968 and the post-Hendon era.

    1968 Tilley gas stoves advertisement


    Opening the box ...

    1344026643-8.JPG

    ... a sternly-worded note warns that if you're not quick to spot and report any missing parts, late claims to have them replaced "cannot be entertained"

    1344026654-9.JPG


    Good job that 40-odd years on I'd no claim for missing parts.


    Some idea of size, compared here with light and packable Alp 7000 and Lytham Titch butane stoves

    1344026664-10.JPG

    1344026680-11.JPG


    Though the gas source and method of fuelling is different, there's a resemblance to a Hank Roberts stove, though again the Tilley's not remotely as light or packable as the HR

    1344026695-12.JPG

    1344026713-13.JPG


    I'd say it still qualifies as a camp stove, certainly when compared with a building-site type of boiling ring, connected here to a 907 (large) Campingaz cylinder

    1344026725-14.JPG


    Flame pattern's more camp stove-like too

    1344026736-15.JPG

    1344026750-16.JPG


    Not only is it "for people who get about", apparently "It's easy to see it's a Tilley!" too

    1344026808-18.JPG


    User instructions and parts list

    1344026823-19.JPG 1344026838-20.JPG

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 2, 2015
  2. snwcmpr United States

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    Very nice post.
    Ken
     
  3. Matukat United States

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    Cool gassie! Nice find. :-)
     
  4. teletim United Kingdom

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    Great Stuff
     
  5. DAVE GIBSON United States

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    the valve on the cart looks like it's heavier than most Gaz stoves made now..great post--
     
  6. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi John, I wonder if the gauze below the jet was ever intended to trap particles before they could block the burner?

    Perhaps the gauze is there to pre-heat the fuel vapour before it reaches the jet?

    Or could it possibly be there there to act as a flame-arrestor?

    I wonder......

    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  7. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Dave Gibson said,

    Substantial, Dave, certainly substantial.

    On the left (below) new-style Primus control (Omnifuel), left (top) older Omnifuel gas cartridge connector/control valve and the Campingaz control valve on the right

    1344112524-21.JPG


    You could be right, George, about the pre-heat function though it's a stove that was never intended to take a liquefied butane feed, such as can be achieved with an inverted gas cartridge on a butane stove with a pre-heater loop.

    As such, I don't think it would need any pre-heating of the fuel.

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  8. Jeopardy

    Jeopardy United Kingdom Subscriber

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    The feed pipe is detachable from the cylinder for transport and storage so the Gauze would be a very sensible precaution to stop dust and other crud that could easily get into the tube from reaching the jet.

    Out of interest, is there an o-ring or other form of seal in Knurled fitting on the end of the tube that screws onto the cylinder?

    Regards
    John
     
  9. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Makes perfect sense about the purpose of the gauze, John, of course.

    Hope the following sequence of photos and captions answers your question about how the connectors make a seal

    Knurled hose-end fitting to what I'll call 'intermediary' fitting (hexagonal nut connector). So no O-ring seal, but in a joint not intended to be tightened with a spanner (wrench) but by hand, those concentric rings in the knurled fitting make an excellent seal in the rubber disk, even when just finger-tight. Notice the left-hand threads

    1344114064-22.JPG


    Other side of that hexagonal fitting also has left-hand threads and couples with the control valve, the seal made between the rubber disc and a metal mating surface, but intended to be tightened by a spanner, so no concentric rings

    1344114079-23.JPG


    Detail of that hexagonal nut fitting. The rubber washer simply prevents the inner component from dropping out of the hex nut when it's not connected up to control valve or hose

    1344114090-24.JPG

    1344114101-25.JPG


    Assembled

    1344114125-26.JPG

    John
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  10. mr optimus

    mr optimus United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi John a very nice mint example you and i would imagine a rare example,i have never seen Tilley T-Up before in pics or in any document.
    My opinion on the jet gauze purpose as George mentioned, is a flame arrester the reason i would go with that is,with butane unlike liquid fuel the jet hardly ever gets blocked,and would tilley go to the trouble to manufacture a jet with a gauze in it for that purpose but as a flame arrester they would have good reason to go to the trouble and cost, for safety reasons
     
  11. DAVE GIBSON United States

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    seeing the valve in your hand i would say it's more than an entire modern stove!!
     
  12. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Mr Optimus said,

    Flame arrestor, on a butane stove? Oxy/acetylene kit yes, butane stove, don't think so.

    1. No oxygen in the butane gas cartridge to support combustion.

    2. Combination of vapour pressure of the gas in the cartridge, the small size of the jet and the venturi effect of the jet in accelerating the gas emitting from the jet orifice makes propagation of a flame on the burner side of the jet against the high velocity plume of gas, then through and beyond the jet into the gas cartridge impossible. Try lighting gas coming out of the jet. You might get a bit of burning in the eddies the match head or introduced flame creates, but that's all. With the gas control shut, you could induce a tiny flame at the jet, burning the residual and low-velocity gas coming through and that's it.

    3. An oxy/acetylene torch is meant to have the gasses burn from the nozzle and together with oxygen (obviously) being in the fuel on the other side of the nozzle, the potential for flash-back (and hence need for a flame arrestor) is there. A butane stove is designed to inject a fine jet of butane into a burner, or onto a burner plate, where it then mixes with oxygen and becomes combustible. Even on the burner side of the jet there's no scope for the flame to travel 'upstream' where it rapidly becomes starved of oxygen, let alone through and on the other side of the jet.

    4. Empirical evidence. I've as many butane stoves with no gauze or sintered metal filters in the jet as I have with and I don't relegate the latter to non-user status because they're about to go bang! In a favourite article posted in the Stove Ref Library by Snowgoose (Stoves for mountaineering) the manufacturer of Hank Roberts stoves cites the reason for introducing a sintered metal filter in the MkII stove (the MkI had none) was to act as a filter, merely. No mention of 'flame arrestor'. Probably the reason it was needed, as a user convenience and nothing to do with safety, was because of the unique design of Hank Roberts gas cartridges with the fabric wick inside. Particles from the wick could conceivably find their way into the fuel and reach the jet. Other than that, butane gas cartridges are a clean source that don't clog jets.

    John
     
  13. mr optimus

    mr optimus United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi John very good point and thank you for pointing it out,reading your response it makes 100% sense,i can now see how impossible a flame could flash back in the canister and ignite,and even if it did with out oxegen in the canister it would never be able to ignite in the canister,
    Once again John thank you for a brilliant response
     
  14. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Dunno about 'brilliant' Brian, but I was prompted to set something on record to offset a potential worry that our campstoves - petrol/paraffin/butane - suffer from that particular hazard of 'flash-back' through the jet, which they don't.

    Something like a Svea 123 bulging its base in use is an indication of a stuck or blocked safety release valve, overheating due to too large a pot base and overlooking the danger sound of a healthy 'helicopter' buzz becoming 'helicopter in a power dive' scream. What it's decidedly not is flash-back suddenly igniting the fuel vapour in the tank.

    John
     
  15. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark United States Subscriber

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    Morning, Presscall,

    John, your collection continues to be amazing in it's breadth and depth! I see stoves in your collection that I've never seen before, neither in person, nor in ads or photographs! How you come by these interesting treasures is a mystery to me, though I suspect you wear our a lot of shoe leather, and/or wear your fingers to mere nubs in typing auction sites around the world to find these things!!

    Also, as I've said before, your detailed reports and lovely photos are top notch, John, and very much appreciated. I like that you included comparison stoves, like the Hank Roberts, so that us Yanks can see just how large your new Tilley Treasure is! Thank you, my Friend, for your fine work, and for taking the time to share it with us all here at CCS. Stellar stuff!! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  16. RonPH

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    John, am surprised at how those small propane stoves have such large harware e.g. hose and connector attached. Then again, I would think safety in mind since the cylinder attached as shown is quite big and perhaps require a good amount of regulating for such a small stove. Again, nice details of some fine gassie stove is always good for the knowledge :thumbup:

    Ron
     
  17. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Thanks Doc for the kind words! Sources? Bit of both, auction sites, swaps and the occasional car boot (yard sale). I'm heading on vacation for a couple of weeks in France at the end of this week so hoping for rich pickings there if Nicos and Gary (Redspeedster) have left me any Gallic 'finds'.

    High praise though and much appreciated from a master stovie and long-time forager for stoves, tales of which acquisitions have graced CCS for many a year now, so thanks to the 'Doc' for those.

    An odd one this Tilley, Ron, in that the gauge of the hose, the heavy-duty nature of the rechargeable fuel canister it was intended for and the control valve to suit are wholly inappropriate to the concept of a 'remote gas canister at the end of a hose' stove, a concept that had already been perfectly defined with such offerings as the Alp 7000 and, with its own unique variation on a theme, the Hank Roberts.

    John
     
  18. Turki United Kingdom

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    Hi , how are you
    I need this things, how can I buy it?
     
  19. Rickybob United Kingdom

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    i go with the flame-arrestor idea, not to prevent flashback into the cannister but the connector hose itself

    being a lengthy tube and open at both ends there might well be a combustable mix in the hose on first opening the valve to light the burner

    just a thought and in no way do i mean to contra wotsit the Maesto's account but in a way kind of sitting on the fence sort of thing

    also they might have to consider the attempted DIY refilling of cannisters which might introduce air in with the butane

    better safe than sorry afterall
     
  20. Turki United Kingdom

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    Hi Presscall
    How are you?