Tilley Titan

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by King Orry, Jan 28, 2012.

  1. King Orry

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    Hello folks, I've just got hold of a fab Tilley Titan. It's been well used but looks to have plenty of life left in it. I'm not experienced in these things so would welcome some advice, in fact any advice. It seems to be all original including the hose with screw fitting on the gas bottle end. What do I need to get this up and running.? What sort of gas is best.? Sorry if I sound a numpty but as I said I've very little knowledge of anything other than those 'suitcase type' cookers where the canister simply clicks. Thanks in advance, Mick. :?
     
  2. RonPH

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    I believe the person who can give you more information is Doc Mark as I believe he owns one.

    Ron
     
  3. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    These are a very good stove. Make sure the hose is in good condition before using and replace the o ring the the connector. This connector will be either a primus or companion fitting (most likely companion) and will fit a small bbq type cylinder. These can be refilled with either propane or a propane/butane mix depending on what is available.
     
  4. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi, Mick,

    Welcome to CCS! Ron is right, I do own a wonderful Tilley Titan, through the kind and generous auspices of my good friend, Ian, here at
    CCS! As I understand it, there were at least two versions of this stove, both having a different requirement for fuel tank pressure regulation. The one I have has been made usable merely by snipping the end from a regular Coleman propane hose, and slipping the raw end over the tip of a propane regulating assembly, holding it all in place with a hose clamp, which the Brits call something else (though I forget your name for it). I'm sure one of our CCS Brothers from your side of the pond will be along shortly to let you know the colloquial name for this type of device. Though I worried about it, in the end, adapting my TT to run on regular bottled propane was easy-peasy, and the stove runs hot as hades, and simmers like a champ!!

    NOW, as I understand it, there was another version of this same stove, which worked on a different regulating pressure, and that version does not work worth beans on bottled propane, and needs an actual propane tank, with full regulator attached, unless I am remembering it wrong. I'm sure Ian, or one of the other adults here at CCS will be along shortly to correct any faulty memories from this child, himself! ;) :oops: :D :D I would include a photo of mine running on bottled propane, but currently, Sweet Bride and I are stranding in Gilbert, AZ, not far from which we had Jeep troubles today, and to which we limped back, after having experienced them. The Jeep dealership does not open again until Monday morning at 7AM, so we'll be hotel-bound until just before then. Afterwards, depending on how quickly the Jeep can be fixed, we'll be working here in AZ until early in February. In any case, I have no photos of my TT on my laptop, and thus, cannot include them in this post. Your Tilley Titan is a fantastic stove, though, and well worth whatever you have to do to get it up and running, safely, again!! Congrats on getting a most cleverly designed stove, and have fun getting the Old Gal back in service! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc
     
  5. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    every version I have seen of all the Tilley stoves have been high pressure (straight from the bottle)
    Easy way to tell. Stainless steel burner with lots of small holes and a truncated cone shape is high pressure. Large ring shaped burner with less large holes is low pressure. There are variances but the larger the burner hole the lower the pressure.
    If you light in a well ventilated space getting it wrong isnt that dangerous as long as you dont leave the burner on without burning for more than a few seconds. Low pressure burner with high pressure gas will just blow itself out High pressure burner with low pressure gas wont even manage a candle flame.
    Handle the above with due caution I am the only member of CCS who has had the fire brigade turn up to a stove testing. They wernt required but not everyone thought that.
     
  6. RonPH

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    Sorry to temporarily hijack this thread. Doc, I do hope you get your Jeep 'back on the road again' as the song goes.

    Ron
     
  7. King Orry

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    Thanks for the replies, I'm going to my local camping shop for a chat to see what they have available. During cleaning I removed the jets/nozzles or whatever they're called from the two burners, they both seemed to have 'mud' or mud like debris inside. Is that likely to have been gunk built up over the years or have I inadvertantly removed a gauze I shouldn't have touched.? I'm really looking forward to getting it fired up, the pics elswhere on this site show it to be a very capable piece of kit. Thanks again. :)
     
  8. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    Its not mud. Its a sintered ceramic filter. Its a pain of an idea. On mine I had a dodgy jet which I tried everything on even giving to the experts who said it cant be cleaned or replaced. Looked around the garage and found a Tilley go Gas stove that hadnt seen light of day in decades and was too heavy to use backpacking anyway. It has the same burner and jet (or at least had the same burner and jet)

    A filter that can't be cleaned or replaced is a really intelligent idea.
     
  9. Donnod123

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    Tilley have also produced a low pressure version of there stove. But the good thing is they seem to mark both up with what type they are
     
  10. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner Admin SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Where is the mark? Mine is high pressure but it would be good to know where to look in case I come across another without the hose/tap assembly.
     
  11. Donnod123

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    On all the ones I have seen they say bottle pressure / or indeed the Mbar pressure. On the titans I have this is on the label on the inside of the stove hosing.

    It also ( but I could be wrong) looks like the low pressure versions have a "Screw" looking head in the very centre of the burner.
     
  12. Spiritburner

    Spiritburner Admin SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Cheers. I saw a Zebco advert for the Titan after you mentioned them here. I wonder who made for who?
     
  13. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    A look at the burner easily identifies the type. We all know what type a burner is by its look
     
  14. Murph

    Murph United States Subscriber

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    Doc Mark, they call hose clamps "Jubilee clips" on their side of the pond!

    Murph
     
  15. Jeopardy

    Jeopardy Subscriber

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    Hi,

    Just found this information, supposedly from Tilley (whose own site no longer mentions gas stoves), on ukcampsite.co.uk

    SINCE 1982 ALL GAS (BUTANE) COOKERS ARE LOW PRESSURE WHICH MEANS THEY NEED A REGULATOR ON THE GAS BOTTLE

    PRIOR TO 1982 THE COOKERS WERE HIGH PRESSURE (BOTTLE PRESSURE) WHICH DID NOT USE A REGULATOR

    Regards
    John
     
  16. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith Subscriber

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    I presume you missed out the word 'not' from that sentence.

    I'm not so sure they're actually 'filters' in the accepted sense because there shouldn't be anything to filter from the gasified fuel. I think they're more likely to be something along the lines of 'flame arrestors' for the high-pressure i.e. unregulated system and also to help prevent liquid fuel reaching the burners. This could be a particular problem if the gas bottle isn't placed well below the level of the burners and result in a spectacular flare-up. This, IIRC, is mentioned in the instructions. Thus, being a safety feature, it wouldn't be an intelligent idea if they could be removed.

    (And before Trevor jumps in - no, I haven't had one of these flare-ups... =; )
     
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  17. sammonsmx

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    All of the Titan's I have seen are high pressure. The Talisman's definately were available in low and high pressure versions. I have a Mark 6 Talisman (low pressure) and 3 Titans, all complete with the rare adapter that connects them to the Camping Gaz bottles. I tend to replace the hoses with new, and connect to a cheaper gas source. They also run well enough on the EN417 propane/butane mix cartridges with the appropriate connector. These are not cheap, but I do refill them from a 4.5Kg Calor cylinder. All good fun - most challenging part is making good connections with jubilee clips.
     
  18. Jennifer Dyke

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    Please help me our hose got cut last year at a garage but he couldn't get the regulator on... How do I know what the best gas to use and pressure ...im really attached to this stove as it was my late dads ... tilley titan model 960 the gas pipe is so narrow and also the connection to the cooker looks like it's sealed 1527851169023506536277.jpg 20180525_190149.jpg 20180525_190904.jpg
     
  19. Robert Bruce

    Robert Bruce SotM Winner Subscriber

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    In my opinion high pressure is a pain. Here in Australia a lot of campers use Primus high pressure ones. They are good when new but most people aren’t fasdidius enough to keep dirt etc from getting in. This blocks the jet which can’t be cleaned, I have tried. Some time ago I got one from a skip at a camping ground, blocked jet and I suppose the camper just threw it out. So when home I drilled out the jet , gave it some more air and put a regulator on it, it worked well on low pressure . It was worth the effort and if it did not work it could go back in the skip but it worked.

    Cheers
    Rob
     
  20. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    99% of modern camp stoves are high pressure. Its not the fault of the high pressure that the jets cant be cleaned its the manufactor cost of $1.23 for the 2 burner and $2.11 for the 3 burner (if it has legs) that means shortcuts were taken in making these stoves. The Tillys have a sintered brass insert in the jet which is a pain to clean but soaking in dish wash machine solution can work. I just replaced the faulty jet in mine from a tilly go system hiking stove that had long since expired. Also replaced one of the regulators from this. Do keep an eye on the 2 o rings in the regulator. Ive had a couple of failures in mine