Tin-smithing a circular spirit can

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by Twoberth, May 8, 2021.

  1. Twoberth

    Twoberth United Kingdom Subscriber

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    It has been pouring down all day here, but the postman brought me some tin-plated steel so no more need to recycle syrup tins.

    This is a copy of a Primus 1738 spirit can, but slightly larger so it does more primes. (35mm x 60mm)

    The circular ends are formed over the steel block, and then the body is bent into a cylinder and fitted inside the ends. Ends are soldered first, then the long seam then the filler cap.

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    Fitted with paper decal, and shown next to the smaller No.1738

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  2. Murph

    Murph United States Subscriber

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    Well done! Excellent job on the flanges on the end caps!
     
  3. Twoberth

    Twoberth United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Thanks @Murph
    The rough formed flanges were about 3mm, and then cut down to 2mm and as parallel to the ends as I could get them with tin snips. Then they are lightly formed again to give a tight fit around the cylindrical body ends.
     
  4. Ian

    Ian Subscriber

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    Excellent work, as usual. :)
     
  5. nmp

    nmp United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    @Twoberth Oh no! you may have set me a challenge! Nice work and especially the soldering did you use just the iron or a blow lamp as well?
    Nick
     
  6. Twoberth

    Twoberth United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Thanks Ian and Nick.
    I used a soldering iron for everything this time. A blowlamp produces too much heat tinge on the new tinplate.

    The challenge is on Nick! I also made a funnel from the off cuts and some rusty tubing.

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  7. nmp

    nmp United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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  8. ROBBO55

    ROBBO55 Subscriber

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    Looks good :thumbup:
     
  9. Lance

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    The trick to soldering tubes to flats is to make the tube first then set the tube on the flat bit. Of coarse you have cleaned everything so it will solder easy and even maybe tinned it first. Regardless, make sure the flat bit is larger than the tube enough that you can set the solder iron on the flat bit and against the tube. This is done so the heat will travel into the joint and then apply the solder to the joint not to the iron. This gives a nice small solder joint without a lot of overflow. You can then trim the flat bit to the size of the tube and file (carefully) to make it round.

    IIRC I have shown such a process in the fettling forum back in the day before I went away for a spell.

    Lance
     
  10. Haggis

    Haggis Subscriber

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    Well done indeed…

    I’m impressed with myself when I make a simple windscreen from a piece of roof flashing…
     
  11. Lance

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    Haggis said: I’m impressed with myself when I make a simple windscreen from a piece of roof flashing…

    Haggis i'm impressed with myself when i can find a piece of roof flashing. lol
     
  12. Murph

    Murph United States Subscriber

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    @Twoberth , for soft solder work, use a heat gun, all the heat you need with no flame! Works a treat, IMO!

    Murph
     
  13. Twoberth

    Twoberth United Kingdom Subscriber

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    @Murph
    Thanks for the tip.
    I have been meaning to get a heat gun for a while now. You have given me another reason to buy one.
     
  14. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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  15. Twoberth

    Twoberth United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Thanks George.
     
  16. Murph

    Murph United States Subscriber

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    @Twoberth , one other trick I've used for soldering steel is to put the area to be soldered in a bath of copper sulphate, puts down a flash plate of copper, gives the solder something to "bite" on to.

    Damned if I'll let the blokes at work in on this, they can all sling their hook for what I think.

    Murph
     
  17. Twoberth

    Twoberth United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Thanks for the tip Murph.
    I bought a heat gun this morning and have used it a little. It takes some getting used to, as I am used to the soldering iron acting as a clamp as well as a heat source.
    The good news is I have plenty of old cans to practice on.