Unidentified mini petrol stove

Discussion in 'Mystery Stoves' started by yonadav, Oct 22, 2010.

  1. yonadav

    yonadav Subscriber

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    Hi all,

    I found this little petrol stove in the flea market today. I cannot find any imprint on the stove itself. The tin can has a lot written on it, but not a name or a date. The tin lid is missing. One of the pot stand holders is missing, and I will have to make a replacement.

    Any clues to its origin and age are welcome.

    Yonadav

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  2. yonadav

    yonadav Subscriber

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    According to this site, it's called PICNIC Camper's stove:

    http://www.asahi-net.or.jp/~we2a-sod/stove/stoveliqbrass2ie.htm

    Yonadav
     
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  3. DAVE GIBSON

    DAVE GIBSON Subscriber

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    i have one just like it,all it's good for is the bookend i use it for.the cans come it all sort of imprints but the stove inside is the same and i assume from Japan in the 50's 60's.
     
  4. geeves

    geeves New Zealand Subscriber

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    That one is a Handy. Its identical to the picnic and a dozen others. Only the paint on the can changes. They work ok but have absolutely no control or safety features. They have been known to explode. Use at own risk
     
  5. nzmike

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    Had one exactly the same, it was a bit of a giggle. It ran ok if loudly but is utterly intolorent of cross wind, inside or heavy shelter only for reliable use. And it was, mostly. As ever the fuel cap seal needs to be right and the beast itself free of cracks, damage etc in the usual fashion. The tiny pin hole jet needs to be watched, probably because I ran mine on unleaded 87 octane gasoline but is easily cleaned with the right sized pricker.

    There should be a cork to plug the loop for travel.

    :!: HEALTH WARNING :!:

    Where ever stovies gather in dark sheds and forgotten basements, hushed tales are told of the loop burners that overheated, melted their solder joins and spewed licquid and vaporous petrol in a cloud of unhappiness. Deeply uncool. Dont leave it running for hours under a big pot and/or without good ventilation. I ran mine for 'brew-up' lengths of time with a coffee perk over it without incedent. Still dont trust the buggers tho.
     
  6. cazna

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  7. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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  8. yonadav

    yonadav Subscriber

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    OK, you got me convinced. I'm going to clean and polish it, and then use it as a book-stand and a conversation piece. Don't wait for flame shots here...

    Yonadav
     
  9. The Bird

    The Bird Subscriber

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    Hello all,

    I have one of these, I bought it from one of our members here. It was made in New Zealand, under the name Marburn. I use it whenever I travel any long distance in the car, as it brews a good cuppa. As long as it is treated with respect, it performs well. I maintain it well, checking the tank lid seal before each trip. If I blow it out before loosening the tank lid, I have no trouble. I am about to modify an A10 Spaghetti Can to use as a wind shield, similar to the Primus 71k I own. Sure, they can be a little touchy, but then anything can, if it ain't looked after. Having seen an Injun Scout up close, I'd have to agree, reeeeeeally cheap, and veeeeeery nasty. Wouldn't touch it.

    Cheers,

    Mike.
     
  10. itchy

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    Yonadav,

    I have a couple of this style stove, including the Handy campers'. I agree they are more toys than working stoves.

    However, I think you can safely test it, at least once, if it looks intact, the cap seals, and you do it in a safe location where you can put out a small fire if you need to.

    DO NOT prime it like you would a Svea 123, that is way too much heat and you are likely to get a pool of burning liquid fuel. And don't fill it full the first time you test it. There is a wick that carries the fuel to the loop, so give it time to saturate the first time you try it. Then, a match or lighter under the loop for a second or two will usually be enough to start it. To put it out, knock off the wind screen, and blow it out -- then vent the cap. Also the tank gets warm quickly and pouring a little cool water on the base of the tank will lower the pressure and that can be enough to put it out, or at least slow it down.

    I have made coffee and hot water for ramen with mine a few times. They are fast to light and put out a lot of heat for such a little stove. I would not try to cook a family meal on it. :smile:
     
  11. yonadav

    yonadav Subscriber

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    I'm still not sure if I want to put this stove to the fire test, but I did clean it up. Here it is in a more shiny state. I inspected the filler cap, and it has no safety pressure release whatsoever. The washer is nitrile, and the cap has no holes.

    Yonadav

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  12. nzmike

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    Oh fire it up by all means, but do it someplace safe with your preferred fire fighting equipment on standby. Mine started readily (usually) and they do make a neat noise and enthusiastic flame. Quite attractive in their simplicity too. Just don't ever trust them.
     
  13. theyellowdog

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    I would lite it up if I were you, just to see it running, you will be impressed, these are great runners. Shame that if is is lacking in anything that looks at all like a safety feature.

    That Marburn is a pretty nice little stove. I must admit to really liking these coil burners. Glad it found a good home.

    I agree about the Injun Scout looking cheap and nasty, but I wonder if it might actually be the safer model of this stove. I say this because it has a safety spike under the filler cap (the handy campers does not, I think the stesco does) and while it does not work well on kero it is a recommended fuel on the side of the tin. Assuming the target market is teenagers (Scouts etc) the Injun Scout has some advantages. Having said that I don't think either model are good stoves for regular use.

    Dan
     
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  14. threedots New Zealand

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    I think the problem I had with mine was the thin lead washer/safety valve had been compressed to the point where it split letting out gas vapour past the fuel cap thread which ignited then overheated the solder around the filler hole.
    The scare it gave me ment it still hasn't been fixed for a second chance.
     
  15. yonadav

    yonadav Subscriber

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    Well, friends, I gathered the necessary mix of courage and curiosity, and lighted this stove. As it turns out, this is both the first time and last time for this stove.

    Lighting it was real easy, after I carefully put in only 5 cc of petrol. It came up with a nice blue flame within seconds, and I even put a pot of water on top (although I had to support it with a brick, as the third leg is still not there).

    I manage to snap some photos, and then noticed another little flame, just on the side of the filler cap. First suspect was the washer, of course. I put in a new washer, and the flame was still there - at the exact same spot.

    Careful examination showed a 2 mm hairline crack in the tank, branching out from the filler tube hole. Soldering the crack is not an option, and as I do not have silver brazing equipment (yet), the crack is there to remain.

    So, as I previously predicted, this stove will remain a nice conversation piece.

    Here are the photos.

    Yonadav

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    Notice the little flame near the filler cap
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    The crack above the filler tube:
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  16. shagratork

    shagratork United Kingdom Moderator, R.I.P. Subscriber

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    These little petrol coil burners were made in different countries, using the same design.

    Off hand, I can think of the UK, US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. There will be other places, and I am sure some of you will remind me.

    There are all sorts of stories about them. Personally, I have never had a problem with them.
    Always use a small diameter pan on the top as intended. Large diameter pans may cause over heating of the tank, though the tank is expected to get hot.

    Make sure you always extinguish the flame correctly.
    Blow the flame out first and only then ever unscrew the filler cap to release any pressure.
     
  17. RonPH

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    Hi Yonadav, glad you were able to play around with it. Dont know what to say except keep it as a conversation piece for now. Some have had good experiences with those kind of stoves but I personally do not wish to own one with that kind of design due to lack of safety features.

    Ron