VAPORISING TUBE RESTORATION

Discussion in 'Fettlers Master Class' started by kaw550red, Jan 1, 2006.

  1. kaw550red

    kaw550red RIP

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    If a vaporising tube is producing a flame with a lot of yellow in it it needs restoring. If a 0.32 mm pricker (1 & 2 pint size) goes into it you need to restore it

    Lathejpg.jpg

    LATHE My "lathe" is actually an electric drill in a bench holder. This may not be high tech but it does the metal turning jobs that I need although not to engineering accuracy.

    MAKING FORMERS. Mount a suitable piece of steel in the drill chuck. You need a fine file for turning. Do not use excess pressure. Make sure that the drill is revolving against the cutting side of the file teeth. Shape the end of the tool to fit inside of the vaporising tube with an end rounded to be a snug fit inside the top of the vaporising tube. These shaped tools become the former inside the damaged vaporising tube. The inside of the tubes seem to vary in size so a selection of formers are needed

    VTtoolsjpg.jpg

    TOOLS. Apart from the former you will need a hammer and a 0.23 mm pricker in good condition

    VTontooljpg.jpg

    USING THE TOOLS First remove the strainer with long nosed pliers. Insert a snug fitting former into the defective vaporising tube. Place the bottom of the former on a hard surface. Now hammer around the jet to peen the metal towards the jet thus reducing the jet size. It takes a while to sort out how hard to hit the metal to squeeze the jet partly shut but with a little practice you will get the hang of it . Work the hammering around the jet so you are reducing the jet uniformly. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO WHACK THE JET SHUT IN ONE STRIKE. Keep checking with the right pricker until it is a snug fit in the jet. If you have the right drill you could drill the hole again but I find it is better to keep reducing the hole until the pricker is a snug rather than tight fit in the jet.

    Replace the strainer. Assemble the stove and light it. Most of the yellow should have gone from the flame. Some may remain but you should see a big improvement.

    Up to now I have a 100% success rate using this method. Mind making a statement like that is asking for trouble

    Regards Bryan
     
  2. Lance

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    This is just the type of fettling hints that make or break a good fettling job. Here we have a good home shop hint which will "work" every time so long as the proper practices are used.

    WELL DONE kaw550red
     
  3. DougR

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    Neat.
    For those of you having trouble locating a 0.23mm pricker - that's 9 thou in old money - which by happy co-incidence, is exactly the same as the High E strings I use on electric guitar - available cheap everywhere.
     
  4. kaw550red

    kaw550red RIP

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    I forgot to mention that you will need a wire brush or file brush to periodically clean the teeth of the file when using it to shape the former. The teeth clog quite quickly when the file is used for turning.

    The file must be sharp and MUST HAVE A HANDLE FITTED. A file tang could do a lot of damage if the file stuck on the work piece and was thrust at your body.

    Regards Bryan
     
  5. Henry

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    Here's an old fitter's trick for cleaning a file and make them last longer.
    If you continually use a wire brush you will blunt the file.
    Tap it sharply, side on, on the wooden bench, any small bits left, called pinning, can be removed using a piece of copper heating pipe pushed end on across the file. It will remove the most stubborn pinning.
    Try it, it's quite miraculous
     
  6. kaw550red

    kaw550red RIP

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    Hi Henry

    Thanks for that tip. I do not like cleaning files.

    Previously I have been using a screwdriver laid flat along the back of the teeth to remove the pinning. To say it is tedious is a gross understatement. Aluminium seems to produce some of the worst pinning.

    Regards Bryan
     
  7. jc

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    Thanks you guys,
    Three very useful tips in one thread,keep 'em coming.
     
  8. Henry

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    Bryan
    It works well on ally pinning as well.
    If you put the file in the vice to hold it firmly it makes it even easier.
    A piece of 15mm houshold copper pipe about 6" long, piece of rag on the end, or a pair of gloves, hold the pipe up at about 30 degrees and simply 'push' it across the width of the file along the line of teeth. The thin wall of the copper pipe simply slips under the pinning and lifts it out.
    It's not even hard to do, it's like magic. :D
     
  9. kaw550red

    kaw550red RIP

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    Hi Henry

    I used the copper tube cleaning for a file today and it worked fine. Much better than a wire brush. Thanks for that tip. I am very grateful.

    Regards
     
  10. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark Subscriber

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    Morning, Bryan,

    I just wish to offer my thanks for the wonderful tutorials you have been sharing with us all!! First rate stuff, Sir, and VERY much appreciated!! I have printed out everything you have sent along, and it will be housed with my most important stove papers and information! Thanks, again, Bryan, for your generosity and sharing! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc Mark
     
  11. New Camper

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    If you find a file hopelessly clogged with soft metals, try holding the file in a vise and using a a wheel brass wire brush on a drill, brush the file parallel to its cutting edges. Hold on to the drill tight because if the brass brush catches the edge it will sometimes violently swing toward the edge it catches on. It is obviously important to use a brass brush since files, even though highly tempered and hardened, will eventually dull particularly faster when filing hard metals or when misused.
     
  12. kaw550red

    kaw550red RIP

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    Hi Mark

    I have been round stoves since 1952. The work methods that I give have evolved rather than came in a flash of light. I have a lot of experience of doing things the hard way and it seems a pity that other people should go through through similar learning cycles to get to working solution when I can pass on my hard earned lessons. People can then improve on the methods that I use so I will learn from them.

    It is odd but the burner cleaning method that I gave actually came indirectly from the Camping Club which I have been a member since 1967. My mother saw it in a DIY magazine in 1960. It was not until I read an extract from the Camping Club Handbook which is shown elsewhere on this website that I realised where the advice originated from. The method that I use is slightly different from the original method which was to heat the burner red hot and then quench it in caustic soda! I had caustic soda spluttering all over the place when I first tried the method. The burner was taken out of the caustic soda straight after it was quenched so I could not understand what purpose the caustic soda was playing. I tried water and it was just as effective and a lot safer.

    I do not feel like an expert. I still can find rogue stoves that defie logic and will not work properly. I had a 123R that nearly drove me crazy. It gave the symptoms of a clogged burner but the burner had been cleaned three times. It worked but never gave the flame that it should. It turned out to be graphite from the regulating valve packing. For some reason it was coming out of the packing and partially blocking the valve. When the burner had been cleaned water flowed freely through the burner. As soon as it was lit the burner was restricted. I connected the water hose to the regulating valve inlet and blocked the nipple hole and there was suddenly a phut and a flood of minute black particles shot out of the burner. Changing the packing completed the cure. You can usually leave the packing in place when you clean the burner and reuse it. In this case the packing was the cause of the problem.

    Anyhow all are welcome to my advice. I hope that it is useful.

    Regards Bryan
     
  13. Nordicthug

    Nordicthug R.I.P.

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    One of the most useful DIY "hints" I ever learned was from an old man I worked for in 1968, the year I got married. His name was Wilbur Edgell. He had a little busines in Longview, Wa. called "Edgell's Boat and Machine." Half the machines in that shop were shop made by Wilbur. When I met him he was 84 and worked a full day every day but Sunday. He had retired at the end of WWII then nearly died from boredom. To have something to do he opened his boat and machine shop. His lathe was US Navy Surplus, as was the milling machine and table saw. All the other stuff he'd made, including the drill press, marine railway, acetylene generator, welding machine, and for power there was a 110 volt live wire strung about 8' in the air all around the yard. To get power you took a power block consisting of a 2 gang outlet box silver soldered to a 4' length of copper rod and an 8' length of light welding cable with a copper hook on the end. You shoved the rod into the ground, which was soft, rock free, sandy loam about 15' deep with the water table at about 2'. The rod hit water, making a near perfect ground connection, holding the outlet box at a convenient height. You then reached up and hooked the hot lead over the live wire strung overhead yeilding 110 volts at around 30 amps with no extension cord to trip over. Clever, eh?

    That's not the hint, that's just some background on Wilbur and his attitude to doing things. The hint has to do with sharpening files. Wilbur never paid for a new file in his life, he'd pick 'em up at the scrapyard or garage sales or used tool and junk shops and resharpen 'em. He had an old pyrex cake pan he'd pour battery acid into, then lay some files in it for a few days. A good rinse in clean water, wipe dry and you had sharp files nearly for free.

    For any place Wilbur wanted light, he had made fixtures with two light bulbs in series operating similar to his power blocks. They were scattered all around the yard in out of the way places. All had bulbs in them that had been burning continuously twenty years and longer. The two bulbs gave enough light to be useful but operated on 55 volts, running cool enough to last as long as the pyramids.

    The soil also caused things to grow insanely, including grass, blackberry briars, nettles, and thistles, so Wilbur's wife, Jackie kept two geriatric ewes to be serviced each year producing four cuddly, soft, delightful lawn mowers that kept the entire boat yard looking like a golf green all summer then in the fall were converted into delicious spring lamb for the Edgell's and their friends and neighbors for blocks around. Jackie also had a garden the size of a Soccer Pitch that supplied free veggies and berries for the same neighbors. Her strawberry and rhubarb pies could wring tears of joy from a glass eye.

    Gerry
     
  14. barrabruce

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    I think I would like this Wilbur Fella!!
    :lol: :lol: :lol:
    Great thngo one vap tube there Bryan!!
    Used the same thread to fix mine.
    Works like a charm now.
    Thankyou..
    Barra
     
  15. AlanBiker

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    I dropped a bastard file on my foot once :(
    regards,
    Alan
     
  16. Jur

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    A ready-for-use former is the blunt side of a 9 mm drill standing in a vice, wrapped with tape down where the lower part of the lipstick reaches to keep this straight and tight to the drill.
     
  17. exeter_yak

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    Excellent article Kaw550red, & good to see you here again on CCS with another informative post.

    Doug
     
  18. hobowonkanobe

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    I may get my self a 96 just to play w/ that lil nugget of info.
     
  19. RonPH

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    Would someone know the correct aperture for a 1/3 pint stove or are they all the same. I did a bit of peening on the vaporizing tube since the flames were uneven and got them now to where it distributes the flames evenly. Problem now it that I still could not get the nice blue flame I see on some stoves and the pricker I got with the stoves were of 2 different sizes.

    Ron
     
  20. brassnipplekey

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    1/3 pint stoves with 'lipstick' burners (96 , 97, 100 ) & lose top plate jet diameter is 0.23 mm .
    1 pint (00,210 etc ) & 1 litre stoves(discus)& 2 pint stoves the jet Diameter is 0.32 mm .

    Nick