Very Early AGM KampKook No. 3

Discussion in 'AGM - American Gas machine' started by idahostoveguy, May 26, 2012.

  1. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy R.I.P.

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    Here's a very early American Gas Machines KampKook No. 3 double burner. It has the peg legs and the telltale label, which has patent pending and also the lack of the phrase "The Ideal Camp Stove". So this one probably dates anywhere from 1918 to 1921. It's old and worn but the tank was still holding pressure after being shipped and then sitting in my shop for a few weeks. I opened the valve and it went whoosh!

    1338012864-x3old_001.jpg

    It has the early peg legs rather than the curved legs.

    This one came with a filler cap tool.

    Well, here are some more pics....



    1338012873-x3old_002.jpg
    The filler cap tool is in the foreground.


    1338012885-x3old_003.jpg
    Stove grate is unattached.


    1338012894-x3old_004.jpg
    The main burner with priming dimple.



    1338012900-x3old_005.jpg
    The silent burner has only two rows of flame jets.



    1338012907-x3old_006.jpg
    The peg leg in the extended position.



    1338012915-x3old_007.jpg
    The peg leg in the storage position.



    1338012923-x3old_008.jpg
    The complete burner in case.




    1338012929-x3old_009.jpg
    The label. Notice: patents pending. No "The Ideal Camp Stove" phrase.



    1338012952-x3old_010.jpg
    Peg legs extended underneath stove case.



    1338012964-x3old_011.jpg
    The filler cap tool.


    1338012971-x3old_012.jpg
    The main burner with pronounced priming dimple.



    1338012978-x3old_013.jpg
    Control knob for auxiliary burner.


    1338012985-x3old_014.jpg
    The back-side of the burners.



    1338013002-x3old_015.jpg
    The tank had a rectangular label instead of the circular labels found on later versions.



    1338013011-x3old_016.jpg
    A View of the pieces.


    1338013019-x3old_017.jpg
    Stoves parts stored in case.



    1338013028-x3old_018.jpg
    All closed up.



    1338013038-x3old_019.jpg
    The case has one of these pegs to hold the lid down on the stove on both left and right sides.



    sam
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  2. Sparky

    Sparky Subscriber

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    Sam, did that come with a separate tank pump or is the pump integral with the tank body?
     
  3. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy R.I.P.

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    Yeah, I forgot to mention that this didn't come with the external pump. I had actually posted this stove twice and screwed up the post by accidentally hitting the back button on my mouse causing the whole page to disintegrate into thin air (digital air). Each time I started over, less content went into the topic, so by the time I got to the third posting the pump info was missing.

    After playing with this stove a bit, I was glad for the improvements that AGM made in later versions like the hinged grate and attached, curved legs, hinged lid and wind baffles. This stove has none of that and so it is cumbersome to move around since none of those parts are attached. If you pick this stove up with the legs extended, one of the peg legs will come off the latch so that when you put the stove back down, one side of the stove drops. Lots of personality this one has!


    sam
     
  4. DAVE GIBSON

    DAVE GIBSON Subscriber

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    nice post..i have the one with the curved legs and it also fire up without much fussing around.
    unlike newer stoves the fittings look like something from the gas stove in the kitchen and not the tiny easily clogged or busted valves and such on the newer ones.
    i never know if i should repaint mine or just leave it looking old so i can impress people with my old beater that still runs,sort of like my car--
     
  5. terry5732

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    So this end of the wrench is for the filler cap tool?

    What is the filler cap tool for?

    1355611874-1215_wrench.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2015
  6. Doug L

    Doug L Subscriber

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    "I opened the valve and it went whoosh!"
    Music to your ears I bet.
    Thats a cool old camp stove and nice photos presentation.Thanks for sharing
     
  7. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy R.I.P.

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    Whoosh is a very good sound to hear! Love to hear when I get a 'new' stove.

    As for the tool above, it looks like it would fit the filler cap tool just about right.


    sam
     
  8. scouterjan

    scouterjan Subscriber

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    Nice Sam, just had 1 given to me.I think its the same as yours. I will start a new post with mine
    Jan
     
  9. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr SotM Winner Subscriber

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    @idahostoveguy
    Sam, can you, one day, show the filler cap, and the use of the tool?
    The tool, seen above, photographed by @terry5732, looks different.

    Thanks,
    Ken in NC
     
  10. Ron Osburn United States

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    I just came across a stove very similar to this one. The difference is in the fuel pump handle, mine is a T shape rather then one sided.
     
  11. idahostoveguy

    idahostoveguy R.I.P.

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    @snwcmpr @terry5732

    I hope this post settles the question of the filler cap tool. Apparently, I only have one of the pieces that work on the filler cap. Looks like Terry has the 'handle' that turns the 'socket'. I had only taken the filler cap off once many years ago just before I made the original post. Apologies for not posting more details on the tool in action. I know you stovies have been waiting for seven years to see the answer to this question. Sorry for my obtuseness in not answering. I've been quite busy the last few years. So, here goes.


    First, we'll show a pic of the fuel cap with the air inlet for the pump. You have to loosen the round stopper first to pump air into the tank. The bottom piece is the fuel cap, which is hexagonal in shape. In order to get fuel into the tank, the cap must be removed. To remove it, you need the tool. There is no gasket to make the seal.
    agmkampkook-2.jpeg


    Removing the air stopper or valve cap (forgot the name of these things), reveals the fuel cap, which can be seen again hexagonal in shape. Perfect for a wrench but since the position of it is a little recessed, getting a good purchase on it is a little awkward. I suspect that someone in the past had not used the included tool to remove the cap leaving it a little worn on the angled edges. The tool fits in perfectly so would likely not leave the cap with the damage you can see.
    agmkampkook-8.jpeg



    As you can see the tool is the exact size of the cap. The mystery is now coming into full view and being uncovered as we write this.
    agmkampkook-9.jpeg



    The 'socket' part of the tool fits right over the cap. Now, if I had Terry's tool as shown above, I'm thinking that it would fit the square part of the socket and turn beautifully. As I don't, I resorted to an adjustable wrench (spanner?).
    agmkampkook-7.jpeg

    Here's the tool in action. I had forgotten the ferocious smell that the tank had in those seven years ago and was reminded quickly as I removed the cap.
    agmkampkook-5.jpeg



    Here is the cap removed from the tank. As you can see, the cap fits neatly within the tool. Now, if only I had the 'handle' part of this tool....
    agmkampkook-4.jpeg



    Another shot of the cap just out of the tool.
    agmkampkook-3.jpeg


    Here are the tool, the cap, and air inlet.
    agmkampkook-1.jpeg


    A shot of the other inside end of the fuel cap. There is a ball bearing inside the oxidized part of the cap. You can see the two retainers that keep the BB from falling out. When there is air pressure in the tank, the BB shoots up to the top, stopping the air from escaping. When at the desired pressure the other air inlet knob is closed to prevent any escapage of white gas vapors.
    agmkampkook-a.jpeg

    Hope this helps.

    To @Doc Mark the tool is definitely for the fuel cap. Maybe it has multiple purposes?


    Have a good day!
    Sam
     
  12. Doc Mark

    Doc Mark SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Morning, @idahostoveguy , Sam!

    Great to hear from you, my friend! Many thanks for letting me know about this tool. It looked all the world as if it were a "foot", which , along with three more, would fit the holes in the bottom of my early Tourist. Guess not. So, on your advice, I'll take another look at Jan's @scouterjan, and see if more light can be shed on that stove, and hence, mine. Again, wonderful to hear from you, and SB and I do hope that all is well up your way, and that life has been wonderful for you and yours!! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Mark