What stove do Swedes use, most Primus 96 come from UK

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by hikerduane, Jan 11, 2020.

  1. OMC

    OMC Subscriber

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    Hello Duane and back to OP, Good question...
    Re "Don't the Swedes like the 96?"
    Lennart hinted at answer that Swedes tend to hold on to their 96s.​
    A worthy point... it is often the case that, best of breed sought-after / reliable items... people tend to hang onto that type item.​
    Of course, that begs question... so why are Brits quick to sell off their 96s?​
    Topic is directed towards "classic" stoves (good right?) and not modern gear. ​

    ========================

    Assuming pysen speaks for Swedes, two locals have chimed-in: camp stoves
    earlier there were Trangia cook sets for use over open fire.. (my impression, he suggests the M40s / snuskburken.
    there were -stationary kero stoves- (2 pint 3 leggers) very common and
    there were the odd small petrol (radius 42) and 1 pinter (radius 21)
    BUT
    there were at least ten Meta 75/80 sets for every liquid stove (solo/small solid fuel kits).
    pysen also questions if "stoves for sale" is indicator of what was used most?
    --------------------------------------
    more from Lennart: Trangia is very popular in Sweden
    Trangia 25 and Radius 21 are abundant and often cheap in Sweden while the 96 style half-pinters tend to be quite expensive when they emerge on open market.
    ----------------------------------------

    So Trangia 25 setups more often.... is not what I expected. On 1st read my thoughts were:
    military surplus (incl. military storm cookers? these are not common? not as common as M40 I expect)
    and
    for car campers, that a kero Optimus 111 roarer was not suggested?
    Or that type, all in-cased, low profile, roarer.
    -------------------------------------

    For classic and something lighter weight, what models?
    (I was surprised Lennart suggests 1 pinters were not desirable?).

    Svea 123s are much more common is US vs not common in Scandinavia, so my impression Svea in a SIGG is not common there. So re small petrol stoves... (minus SIGG). Primus 70, Op 80, Radius 42.... were they popular/practical?
    thank you
     
  2. hikerduane

    hikerduane Subscriber

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    I notice on Tradera Svea stoves and 123's don't show up.
    Duane
     
  3. Lennart F Norway

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    I guess most small petrol stoves in Sweden were used by more or less alpine trekkers and ski tourists as it was fully legal to pick twigs and fallen branches to make a campfire virtually everywhere in the swedish nature - fires are more regulated today.
    When car camping became more common than non car camping in Sweden it was already in the 1960's(most workers could buy a car) and one of the most common first stoves became Primus 2255 - the early "twist" "grasshopper" with lindal butane cartridge(I still have the one my parents used when we kids were by our grandparents but the burner didn't like the moisture in canoe, on motorcycles or rusty cars).
    The big car camping boom was in 1970's when many workers could buy a new car and still afford a camping trip - now with big family tents(2-3 rooms and full headspace) and camping trailers started to be somewhat common.
    After first family trip my parents realized the grasshopper is just enough for a couple and upgraded to a propane 2-burner suitcase 2000-system that they still have. I think that is the reason Primus 2063 is the most common old camping stove found in Sweden and the big lot is its successors in yellow/green and yellow/orange from the 70's.
    British campers had more need for stoves back then as many forests were strictly private.
     
  4. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

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    @OMC, your answer can be found in the published production and export tables.

    I suspect 'loft finds' will become increaingly rare as those who owned the stoves will increasingly no longer be with us and old unexplored lofts will be increasingly rare.

    Ross and others were aware of the demographic future of previous owners of stoves hence searching for mutually interested individuals concerned about the loss of the history.

    As @Lennart F has pointed out, there wasn't a huge 96 market in Scandanavia hence few examples from the region. Whereas the UK bought them in their hundred of thousands.

    As recently pointed out where are the Peru examples where they should be knee deep in stoves.
     
  5. OMC

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    Simes, Are you just seeing of I'm awake... hehehe
    I expanded on Duane's OP with continued interest in
    what stoves the Swedes used most often (c50s, 60s, 70s.. ok to mid 80s)?
    A good question.

    I did not think lists of exported stoves had the answer?
    -------------------------------------------

    You sign on to the popularity of the 96 in the UK.
    Again with OP continued interest, similarly, what model was most used in Sweden?

    As for open fires. The same could be said for US and for sure some campers would cook entirely on camp fire. However, if camp ground (1950-85) had dozens of sites each with camp fire going… camp stoves & cooking setups were common place. In US for car campers, I'd say more often than not, you expected to see tons of sites w/green coleman suitcases.
    Hikers & climbers... the Svea 123 came into it's own for that niche, for example.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2020
  6. Simes

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    Apologies @OMC :) no test intended, and I think I should have explained a little better.

    I've not checked in detail the figures I'll admit, but from memory what I was trying to infer was a possible explanation for why more 96's are available in the UK in answer to the title of the thread.

    Lennart suggested that the 96 may not have been a popular size stove as compared.to the UK, the growth of car ownership affected both markets in different ways clearly. You can probably see similar trends in the US with Coleman sales figures if they are publically available. Car ownership only really took off in the UK in the late 50's early 60's. Bikes and trains before then, and no cheap lpg stoves to speak of to take on a picnic. A demographic comparison with the Optimus sales figures would be revealing I'm sure, and as manufacturers would have had to respond to their customer demand for particular products. The difference in figures between the 1 and 5 models over the years have always been interesting.
     
  7. Staffan Rönn

    Staffan Rönn SotM Winner Subscriber

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    At least in later years, the 96 was manufactured for the UK market only. I have an Optimus product program list from 1976 where it is stated on the 96 that: "Manuf. on spec. orders for the UK".

    Without any statistical data to back it, only a general "feeling" from customer service calls years back I would say that out of the older Optimus range, neither the 96 nor smaller petrol stoves (8/8R, 99, 123/123R) were very popular in Sweden. Versions of 111's and 00's were much more frequent topics. This limited to Optimus only.
     
  8. hikerduane

    hikerduane Subscriber

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    Out of my extensive Primus 96 collection, I'd say over 35 to 40 have come from the UK. My opinion is from my image of Brits using them for a quick tea brew up or soup for breaks or lunch or on days off for tea when out and about. :) I have both versions of the bike handlebar clamps.
    Duane