Which fire extinguisher do you all use?

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by MarkinLondon, Nov 9, 2013.

  1. Jet-A

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2013
    Messages:
    23
    If you have large flammable liquid fire in an enclosed space, having an appropriate extinguisher is probably your only chance of saving the structure (and maybe your own life) I have first hand experience of using a dry chemical extinguisher on a gasoline & kerosene fire in a garage. Yes, it made a huge mess but it put the fire out and saved the building. Had it failed (it almost did because of the size of the fire), retreat would have been my only course of action.
    Dry Chemical types are by far the most common and do work. CO2 will work on fuel but if other stuff has been ignited by the burning fuel then re-ignition is likely. It does have the advantage of no mess. Purple K is Awesome stuff if you can get your hands on it. It will put out a fuel fire better than just about anything else and I don't care how toxic it is alleged to be. At that point it time I'd rather have the fire out.
     
  2. desmobob

    Offline
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2013
    Messages:
    19
    I have a large ABC type in the cellar doorway and small, non-refillable ones in the kitchen and workshop. I also carry a Halon extinguisher in my car. I'd like to get another large ABC for the house.

    I got the one I have from a local guy that services/refills fire extinguishers. I suspect guys in that business usually have a couple of used ones around for sale.

    I used the big one to save a neighbor's house when the fuel tank of a snowmobile they were working on in the basement caught fire. In my area, if you use your extinguisher to put out a fire, the local fire company will have it refilled for you at no cost (at least that was the case when I used mine on the snowmobile fire).

    As for the type of extinguisher vs. the mess it leaves, I don't care... I want the fire out ASAP! One of my other hobbies is reloading. My garage/basement contains things like Coleman fuel, gunpowder, ammunition, paint, model airplane fuel, gasoline, solvents, etc.

    As a former Navy man, I too would prefer to have PKP extinguishers. That stuff WORKS!

    Take it easy,
    Bob
     
  3. OMC

    OMC United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    4,165
    Location:
    ILLINOIS, USA
    bump OLD THREAD
    8.8.2018 marks a tragic death of fellow stove / lantern enthusiast, he died as a result of burns he suffered in a hobby related fire. An unexpected death at 39 from burns is beyond devastating. I don't know him but we can relate and this is a heart ache to hear. My condolences to Mom, family and loved ones for whom it may be unbearable.
    Thoughts and prayers appreciated but going through what they are... they don't want anyone to have to endure such a loss. This is the most solemn reminder to, routinely consider, safety first.

    I've referred to comments in this post, re "Safety First" list(s), credit Sam @idahostoveguy for his list above.
    He experienced fire emergency "... a [white gas] leak in the tank while the stove was running during a test and then catch fire like a spraying torch."

    Myself and others have experienced fuel spill fire... where a burning puddle travels into an area difficult to extinguish.

    I can think of several tweeks to Sam's list above, one I would *add,
    DO a **fire drill.
    Survey the surroundings where you work on stoves/lanterns. Consider as many "WHAT IFs" that you can think of. Make changes to improve safety and remove any potential hazards.
    Those with fire emergency experience will not overlook the "WHAT IF" scenario that relates to their own incidents.
    Before I fuel, refuel or light any stove I eliminate potential hazards as routine (i'm not perfect but i'm safer than i was, HAVE LEARNED some hard lessons).

    Note: Doing fire drills saves lives. Can be hundreds in an office building or just you in your workshop.
    No drill or list prepares for panic reaction or adrenaline. IE a stovie can put out a fire (vs dial 911) with whatever means available losing focus of their own peril and or injuries.
    *also work on a tray to contain fuel spills
    *remind yourself of stop, drop & roll.
    somber omc

    ** "> Fire drill, go thru the paces needed to extinguish / contain fire in any given area. note: not just a stove, if fuel leaks where might it go (it might be a flowing puddle of flame btw). " source
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2018
  4. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    11,921
    Location:
    Tacoma, Washinghton, USA
    Good advice. Thanks for bringing the topic back up. Is any more known of the circumstances?
     
  5. SimonFoxxx

    SimonFoxxx Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2011
    Messages:
    392
    Location:
    New Zealand
    I have a 2 kg carbon dioxide unit and a 1 kg BCF. I have used the CO2 unit in anger, and it worked very well. Use an extinguisher as soon as things get out of control. Don't wait.
    Cheers
    Simon Foxxx
     
  6. nmp

    nmp United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2011
    Messages:
    1,574
    I did have a stove fire in my garage! The upturned steel rubbish bin worked well, fire was out in seconds but it was a big wake up call! I now have a large Co2 extinguisher on hand and the bucket. My fire involved a small paraffin stove but the fire was big and going out of control fast do not take risks by not having a plan of action ready and an extinguisher on hand.

    Stay safe!
     
  7. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2015
    Messages:
    5,615
    Location:
    Oregon, USA
    @OMC Great idea, thanks for bumping this one.

    I have multiple ABC 2.5lb fire extinguishers scattered around the house and groups of larger ABC extinguishers in the shop. I also have a 5 gallon bucket of water near the welding area for cooling when padding beads, would help put out a conflagration on the right materials for sure. Up stairs in the shop, in the girlfriend's craft room / art studio, are also multiple fire extinguishers and a fire escape ladder.

    With the frequent welding and torch use, stoves are not the most flammable thing I do in the shop.
     
  8. BradB

    BradB United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2013
    Messages:
    1,557
    Location:
    Central North Carolina USA
    I have only once used an extinguisher in a real emergency. Many years ago I was a first year teacher, relegated to teaching 9th graders physical science. That included a half year of chemistry. What? Chemistry? My degree is in physics. Oh well, they were only 9th graders and I guess my two classes of college chemistry were more than enough. Maybe. Anyway, in lab one day we were collecting hydrogen gas from zinc and HCl. You collect it in an upside down bottle and then the kids can light it and make a loud pop when it ignites. Very popular lab with the kids. The head of the chem department told me to take the leftover zinc and throw it in the trash can. He also said to pour the HCl down the drain. Procedures were very loose in those days. After the 9th grade lab I had a class of practical physics for technical level kids. A bit rougher crowd than the college prep kids. After that class, I had a prep period. Just as I was leaving the room to do some printing, I saw the trash can by my desk had a 6 ft high flame roaring out of it. I ran in, grabbed the fire extinguisher, and put it out. The entire room was doused with ash. My initial reaction was that my rough class of kids must have put in a cigarette butt or something. I dumped out the can and carefully examined the contents. Nothing suspicious, just paper and my somewhat used zinc metal. The chem head decided that my still wet zinc must have continued its exothermic reaction and finally ignited the paper. What do I know? I was glad to leave 9th grade chemistry behind and move on to teaching physics. Burning down the brand new school would likely not have advanced my career! Brad
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2018
  9. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Messages:
    4,541
    Location:
    I'm on the way....
    Not being particularly familiar with handling white gas/Coleman fuel and probably like many in the UK in this regard, my accidents have been with spilled meths.

    I will now source a suitable lipped metal tray to act as a bund when using a few of my stoves in confined quarters.
     
  10. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2015
    Messages:
    5,615
    Location:
    Oregon, USA
    @BradB Where were teachers like you when I was in school!?!?

    I've used a fire extinguisher in anger once, when a wee sprog at my parent's place, perhaps 14 at the time. A coat had fallen off a work bench in the garage and onto a propane heater. My mom and I opened the door to the stairs leading down to the garage, saw the flames, she shut off the propane and I grabbed the fire extinguisher and put out the blaze. We vacated for fresh air and regrouping.

    Out in the boonies, volunteer fire dept w/ response time of ~20 mins. Without that fire extinguisher, we'd have lost our house that night.
     
  11. Graham P

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2017
    Messages:
    74
    Reading this and thinking of the possibilities in some cases a "Fire Blanket" might be a necessary part of stove lantern testing equipment with an Extinguisher as last resort.
     
  12. OMC

    OMC United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    4,165
    Location:
    ILLINOIS, USA
    All, If good safety list(s) other than above are already posted on CCS, please link them. Thx.
    A safety list has been an interest of mine (since my own fuel spill fire :oops: ).
    Sam's list above, after his fire, made an impression with me.

    A recent exchange with
    @Ed Winskill and @Dwight inspired following comments:
    [Dwight, camp had one rule: and it was don't sit at table with a stove ???... ok]

    Ed, I have an opinion (surprise). You disagreed with the rule Dwight shared, I post to suggest we do consider the safety concern Dwight has shared.
    He has introduced a new "what if" / *concern worthy of a spot on a safety list, imo.

    You have "... sat on picnic benches with stoves on the table innumerable times.". Me too.

    It is common for camp cooking and eating happening at same table at same time. That said, Dwight's safety concern is valid "sitting at picnic table" close to a stove in use. Esp. if it is in the middle of a table, attached benches full of campers... (this is a possibility in line w/ your comment). ... is a scenario that is best avoided, imo.
    You and others might think omc, "yes yes, of course"...
    well
    … many campers do not understand the hazard that the stove represents. It seems to me Dwight's point is worthy of consideration.

    We may see carefully stated safety lists for:
    > using stoves and
    > testing stoves (many concerns apply to both). and
    > fueling stoves and safe handling, transport & storage of fuel.

    Over these many years have you ever experienced a white gas fire?
    (or fingers, glove/hands or shirt sleeve catch fire ?)

    You describe various situations you use your stoves including sitting. I do the same but also adhere to Dwight's concern:
    *there should be nothing preventing user from getting away from a stove in an instant (it's possible while sitting at an end of a picnic table or alone on a bench but there are also less safe seating and stove arrangements at a picnic bench).
    Sooo often people get complacent, near dangers that are present.

    all, So, one line item to consider / incl. in firedrill:
    confirm there is instant get away and an adjacent space to drop and roll.
    thx omc
    FWIW in inclimate weather, I test under roof, my firedrill reminds me always have instant get away (no doors, knobs or latches), get away with stove on large tray or without stove. I only now also consider ample space nearby to stop, drop and roll. views 1970
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2018
  13. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2015
    Messages:
    5,615
    Location:
    Oregon, USA
    I've sat at tables with running gasoline camp stoves as well, I expect I'll continue to do so. Escape route is well advised.

    My basic rules are:

    1. Refueling space and using space are never the same.

    2. Clean all spills off equipment before lighting.

    3. All equipment will be cool enough to touch before opening any fuel caps. This goes for small engines as well.

    4. I basically don't trust gasoline appliances without Coleman style safety systems. My 8R would be an exception due to it's lack of pump and NRV.

    5. Propane is great for non stovies. The less learning curve the better.
     
  14. OMC

    OMC United States Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    4,165
    Location:
    ILLINOIS, USA
    Thanks Marc !
    I like what I see.
    So, for:
    > using stoves and
    > testing stoves (many concerns apply to both). and
    > fueling stoves and safe handling, transport & storage of fuel.
    you suggest only 4 rules? ok.
    I suggest the > 3rd topic is worthy of it's own list and myself, more than 4 rules for that sub-topic would not surprise me. I hope to see exactly such suggestions and eventually comprehensive list(s) can develop. Thanks again.

    With over 50 years of fire hazards I happened to experience directly, I could go on forever...
    but suffice to say 6 instances are unforgettable.
    Re, above, my: "Those with fire emergency experience will not overlook the "WHAT IF" scenario that relates to their own incidents."

    For me, all 6 were preventable, all 6 related to one of 2 >factors below (or both). That said there are other "what if" concerns that will not occur to me. The 2 I myself won't forget
    > fuel containers
    > the area of the fire allowed it to spread, a 2nd phase. The 2nd phase for variety of reasons becomes dire emergency and major challenge to put it out.
    thx omc
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2018
  15. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2015
    Messages:
    5,615
    Location:
    Oregon, USA
    Yes, only four. Sure you could put down every nuance of sanity and common sense into writing but I'm not going to. No one's going down a checklist of 50 rules before making coffee in the morning, the fewer key rules the better.

    They should be habits, not just rules, and ideally interlocking so that neglecting to follow one or two doesn't result in a conflagration, or at least limits the damage if there is a conflagration.

    I guess another good one is that I will not start a liquid fuel stove in a tent with walls. Under a canopy roof with escape in all direction, sure, but not in a tent with walls.
     
  16. Simes

    Simes Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2004
    Messages:
    4,541
    Location:
    I'm on the way....
    Without any control measures do a hazard analysis of making a cup of coffee in your kitchen in the morning.

    From the time you get out of bed to drinking the coffee.

    Statistically in the UK more people die before they get into a car to go to work than die in car accidents.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2018