Which fuel

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by burny pyromaniac, Apr 27, 2021.

  1. burny pyromaniac Netherlands

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    Hi all,
    I just got a Shmel-2 stove for my birthday !
    I read that it runs on paraffin as well as Coleman fuel. Does it? I usually prefer paraffin, but has someone have experience with it running kn paraffin, or is it better to stick to Coleman fuel?
    Thanks for answering. Greetings, Tonio
     
  2. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    In my experience with THIS example of the later Shmel 4, the gasoline jet orifice is too large for kerosene and massive overfuelling results. Immediately after priming blue flames result but with a lot of yellow too. Within a minute vaporisation of the kerosene fails and liquid fuel emerges from the jet.

    Solution would be to locate a smaller jet size. I don’t know of a source.
     
  3. Radler

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    The construction of this stove is typical for a petrol (gasoline) stove. The vaporising zone is much smaller if you compare it with a classic paraffin stove. The consequence is, with paraffin it's a bit tricky to get the stove running. When really hot, such stoves run as well with paraffin. Maybe you need a different jet.

    Why not using common European unleaded car fuel (E95)? Coleman fuel is unreasonable expensive here.

    Today's unleaded fuel is no problem for these stoves. I used it in a Phoebus Nº 625 for many years. The only disadvantage is, the fuel smells, when you wet hands or things with it. This must be avoided, when you use kerosene or car fuel.

    Radler
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2021
  4. Radler

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    PS. "Essence C" in France or Velind washbenzin (?) in NL are good and much cheaper alternatives to Coleman fuel.
     
  5. Wim

    Wim Subscriber

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    Wasbenzine in NL, not that cheap when bought in 1liter bottles, look out for the 5liter ones. A good alternative is ASPEN4 (NOT ASPEN2 which is for 2stroke (2-takt) engines!), sold in most every garden centre.
     
  6. burny pyromaniac Netherlands

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    Thanks, I already wanted to try wasbenzine, but the aspen suggestion is great. I fired the beast up with coleman fuel: great. Runs a little rich, but I will let it burn for a while. I don’t know what was still left in the fuel tank. I will post pictures later. It is a nice robust beast of a stove. Looks like I can throw it down from an appartment building and still look like nothing happened, that robust. I like it. Greetings, Tonio
     
  7. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner SotY Winner Subscriber

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    The Prim Compact is a Russian gasoline stove with a silent burner resembling that on a Shmel.

    AD6F3790-2D5B-4768-87BD-7C0606E9A098.jpeg

    2DCAAFD7-2890-46F6-A65D-71700F7BF2C6.jpeg


    My example came with a spare jet and I reduced the jet orifice size from 0.32mm to 0.23mm using the technique I devised by silbrazing a length of hypodermic needle in the one on the left.

    7E777CF1-DA56-4A8B-816A-C7E36EEFF0FF.jpeg

    8E37C457-001F-458E-9739-4637CBF5AEC4.jpeg


    The smaller jet orifice ensured fuelling for kerosene is correct and vapourisation is achieved with the usual spirit prime and is reliably maintained.

    BEDC3A44-0919-4567-BA8C-D4B83DB2FA88.jpeg