White gas stove for larger pots?

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by SamPNW, Jan 19, 2021.

  1. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    CHB, I really like the color you've used on your 500 and 502, very sharp.
     
  2. Brenneman

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    Thinking of an alternative option...
    Are you considering a cast iron pot of that size? That’s in it self quite heavy already.
    With a stainless steel or aluminum pot of that volume (water, stew,...) will also be of considerable weight.
    If you are considering a traditional round wok, you need a base where it can nest in.

    Given all of this, have you considered a (foldable) cooking stand?
    Here’s an example:
    https://www.lehmans.com/product/petromax-cooking-stand

    You would need something like a stand/riser beneath the stove to lift your stove so it has the correct distance between the burner and the bottom of the pot.

    In this setup it can be avoided that all the weight is on the stove itself.
    You can easily position a foldable aluminum windshield around it if needed.

    Using your 502 is possible or you could consider an additional white gas stove which suits your heat output needs (fast boiling, simmering).
    Options next to the earlier mentioned Coleman models are MSR or Optimus stoves with a remote tank or a Phoebus 625.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2021
  3. Sternenlicht

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  4. Alcoholic Australia

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    413 appears the easiest solution here in a preformed stove. A bit of offset on a skillet isn't the end of the world and doesn't appear required for this application in any case. I have its three burner cousin and it's adequate, with a bit of offset.

    Otherwise, just find an external pot support / trivet to support your pot at the right height and place your single burner stove under that. I have a 533 but rarely use it for our typical camping trips because our camps are usually in some pretty rudimentary places and a level camp table is a luxury rarely afforded as a result. Without a dead level and stable surface to work on, this stove design leaves quite a lot to be desired in terms of spilt food. However, it has plenty of heat output for really quite big pots so finding a suitable external pot support would likely be the best solution. I have seen a few you tubers do some creative things along these lines but don't have the links to hand at present. Reminds me that I should attempt the same myself...
     
  5. orsoorso

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    [​IMG]

    BRS 7
    really big, powerfull, 3,2 kg.
     
  6. Lantern

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    What about an MSR Dragonfly?
     
  7. Daryl United States

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    Sam, I put some pictures together to show what these three stoves look like with empty 13lb 5qt dutch oven looks like bottom is 9" across. The grate on the 500 and dragonfly measure 7" 502 is 5". 500 would be the safest to use. Might be pushing the limits of dragonfly with 6-8qt liquids. You have two fine small stoves but as you know they have limits. May want to get single burner propane turkey fryer type burner which is made for large heavy loads and has larger burners for fast heating also. I had one that used 1lb or bulk tank and with removable legs was not much bigger the suitcase stove. Think safety first. The deep 10" cast iron is safe on the 500 not so safe on 502
    100_7405.JPG 100_7406.JPG 100_7408.JPG 100_7169.JPG 20200927_161932.jpg
     
  8. cottage hill bill

    cottage hill bill Subscriber

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    Before the plague I used my HGP for making a low country boil for 10-20 people. Potatoes, corn on the cob, sausage and shrimp all boiled in the same pot.
    Shrimp boil 1.jpg
     
  9. orsoorso

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    just hoping sausages and shrimps not together.
    Forgive me I'm Italian
     
  10. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    Photo from Wikipedia of chicken, shrimp, and sausage gumbo; a traditional combination in Cajun and Creole cuisine:
    Gumbo - Wikipedia
     
  11. cottage hill bill

    cottage hill bill Subscriber

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    Absolutely they all go in the same pot. Red potatoes, corn on the cob broken in half, andouillie (a spicy cajun sausage) some kielbasa or other mild sausage for the wimps in the group and nice fresh Gulf of Mexico shrimp, preferably 7-10 count Royal Red. That means 7-10 shrimp to the pound. Nice big fellows size of your thumb. Boil water, Potatoes in first, 5 minutes or so sausage in bring water back to boil, 15 minutes add corn bring water back to boil, 10 minutes add shrimp boil until pink, about 3 minutes. All seasoned by a bag of seasoning called crab boil, available from several makers and on every grocery store shelf in the south. It goes in the pot just before the water.

    Stolen photo, but here's how it comes out. Great easy way to feed several hungry people. Wine and beer of your choice to accompany.
    low country boil.jpg
     
  12. Marc

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    I'm hungry now.
     
  13. gieorgijewski

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    Last edited: Jan 21, 2021