Why do we need regulated burners on kerosene stoves?

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by Twoberth, Jan 30, 2020.

  1. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr Subscriber

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    Is the high pressure in a tank really a factor with the regulator turned down?
     
  2. Murph

    Murph United States Subscriber

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    Wow. You've all overlooked the obvious. Having a regulated burner gives you more options for fuel. With the added control, you can use kerosene or naptha - which, back in the day, was the same as motor fuel for the cars of the era.

    Murph
     
  3. Wim

    Wim Subscriber

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    Even with a regulated burner I would NEVER use naphta in a stove designed to run on kero, and would strongly advice against it!
     
  4. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    I, too, seriously doubt that that is one of the "whys"...
     
  5. ArchMc

    ArchMc Subscriber

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    I would never do that, either. But he's right. The regulated burner allows you to shut the stove down without releasing pressure. It's no more dangerous than a 111b. Just make real sure the NRV is good before you start it up.

    ....Arch
     
  6. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    I don't agree with the 111B comparison, because your basic regulated silent is a domestic stove, not an outdoor stove. (At least, that's how I interpreted the topic.)

    Domestic stoves were used daily indoors, maybe several times a day. They were everyday cooking stoves at home, and the use of petrol in such circumstances is dangerous, because with constant use, spills and various mishaps will happen.

    So I wouldn't use a Coleman petrol stove indoors, at least not more than during a short blackout. Same with petrol in traditional regulated silent brassie.
     
  7. ArchMc

    ArchMc Subscriber

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    Let me be more clear: It's possible to use a regulated domestic with the same degree of safety as a 111b. I'm not saying it's a good idea. We've all discussed the shortcomings of non-Coleman NRVs for petrol stoves, and these shortcomings are much more serious for any stove used indoors, especially in a domestic setting (frequent use, inexperienced users (including children), proximity of flammables, etc).

    ....Arch
     
  8. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    One can run a classic unregulated roarer on petrol if need be outdoors, and were I somehow caught out in the woods with an empty one, but only petrol fuel in the bottle, I wouldn't hesitate at all to use it. I'd be a little more careful, and I'd put something flat between the airscrew and the burner when I released the pressure. I've mixed some petrol in kero in cold weather on a couple of occasions.

    It only comes up because "why do we need regulated burners on kerosene stoves", the title of the thread, does not include Murph's 'obvious'...8]