WW2 era German gasoline stoves :)

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by mg3442, Mar 20, 2014.

  1. mg3442

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    From left to right: Prewar Juwel 33. Wartime Juwel 33. Late war Wiktorin. Arara 37....Tools and spares for Juwel, Arara and Wiktorin :) Me I am no Nazi sympathizer or anything like it, I am just born in Norway with all the war history around me....Last but not least, the old Jerry stoves are darn nice I have to say :D
     
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  2. Stoveuser

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    Tøft :thumbup:
    Nice collection of small stoves. :thumbup:

    Best regards
    Stoveuser
    From the other end of the country
     
  3. mg3442

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    Yeah they are fine historical objects, and make your coffee any day still after all these years :)
     
  4. JonD

    JonD United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Good finds in Norway!
    I have been in Oslo but never made it to the far North beyond Alta. Tromso is most northern I have made.
    In Trondheim (I mostly visit) there are some very nice wick lamps but I have never seen anything like a pressure stove or lamp for sale.
    I was sure there must be things like this - but how do you find them?
    This is not about whether they are war time items or not...just interesting history and useful!
    I have been in Sweden too and they like the new but the historical items seem hard to find.
     
  5. mg3442

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    Me I have been a collector all my life, interested in history, religion and culture. This means I have connections all over Scandinavia and the world.
    Here in Norway you have to search the second hand shops and or get to know the locals out in the villages.
    When they realise you are trustable and serious they open up and come forwards with a lot of things the forefathers hide away :)Many people here in Norway are doomsday preppers because they remember poverty and war, they stuff away a lot of weaponry, stoves and such for worse times :) In the cities I believe it's more difficult to find anything if the people you know are urban....Farmers, fishermen and Sami people are the ones to connect with for such items.

    The real war in Norway was from Trondheim and northwards, with partisans, battlefields and huge German fortifications stuffed with gear. Much of this was left unguarded for some weeks/Months after wars end.
    In Finnmark and Northern Troms county the Germans themselves blew up the lot and left huge amounts of equipment as they retreated down to the Lyngen fortifications in November/December 1944. People who stayed behind after the evacuation grabbed what they could get hands on just to survive. A lot I have got from them, and completed through ebay when needed.
     
  6. OMC

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    hi
    I like the stoves and your enthusiasm.
    1. homelife on an exposed northern coastline above the artic circle that's significant for day-to-day life. Realizing that, your signiture: "life ain't for new beginners", coming from you, there, takes on a new meaning for me. Our hobby seems to lend itself to many in cold climates, not sure how many are above the Artic circle?
    B. i admire YOUR approach to collecting "get to know the locals out in the willages. When they realice you are thrustable and serious they open up and comes forwards with alot of things the forfathers hide away :)Many people here in Norway are doomsday preppers [really? ok.]... Farmers, fishermen and Sami people are the ones to conect with for such items".
    This is as much about finding GOOD in people (anywhere) as it is about finding good stoves. Making a real connection to history is a huge bonus as well.
    Reindeer herding will be history for Sami the way it looks, so preserving aspects of that culture are no longer routine, it will take some effort. It's a story thats been repeated everywhere, open lands are taken, people are less free and their cultures are pushed-aside.
    I enjoyed your posts,
    again.
     
  7. nickinak

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    Do you have an idea how stoves were issued? Per squad, per a number of troops or in armor units by the vehicle?
     
  8. mg3442

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    I am not sure how the stoves were issued. I know they had them in vehicles and assume they had one in every rifle squad.

    Doomsday preppers was just an expression, a lot of people I know up north don't trust the good times. So therefore they save weaponry, old horsegear and stoves
     
  9. theyellowdog

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    Hi, great stoves, I had a Arara 37, one of the only stoves I regret selling. Thanks for sharing.
     
  10. mg3442

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    Ok good people, i`ve realised that no one can answer for sure how the German gasoline stoves was managed during the war years. I now have connected with the Norwegian war museum and homefront museum, they promised me to see if they could find anything about this matter in their archives.
    My belief is that if anyone can answer this it`s them so fingers crossed :)