Yet another Rambler.

Discussion in 'RM MFG & Engineering Co Ltd' started by Robert Radcliffe, Aug 19, 2019.

  1. Robert Radcliffe

    Robert Radcliffe United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I just added a Rambler to my collection. As others have said in design, if not actual date of manufacture, seems a bit of a missing link between modern gas stoves with attached disposable gas cartridges and liquid fuel stoves.
    It proved easy to fill using a cheap butane canister and a lighter adaptor although, as ever, being outdoors is highly recommended.
    It produced muted flames until the jet was pricked then it basically became a portable Bunsen burner. Seems a design flaw to have aluminium pot supports, these must be prone to melting.

    20190819_112621.jpg 20190819_112534.jpg 20190819_112548.jpg 20190819_112631.jpg 20190819_112838.jpg 20190819_114826.jpg
     
  2. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    I’ve not encountered any that have, nor in the RM paraffin stove application. The flame doesn’t impact on them and radiant heat is conducted away, contributing to offsetting the evaporative cooling of the butane in the tank - marginally so though.

    John
     
  3. Robert Radcliffe

    Robert Radcliffe United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Several members mention legs melting on this stove and the paraffin stove in the post titled Another Rambler - there's a photo of one melted in the post.

    Rob.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2019
  4. kerophile

    kerophile United Kingdom SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Hi, the British-made stoves branded as RM, Veritas and Thermidor, and some of the small Monitor stoves used Aluminium for legs for many years following WW2.

    Steel was tightly rationed during this period because of re-building effort after war damage. There was a lot of non-rationed Aluminium available because of the cut-back in aircraft construction, so it was used for stove legs amongst other things.

    The first Landrover vehicles had Aluminium body panels for the same reason. They were also classed as Agricultural vehicles, rather than automobiles, so that they could jump the queue for scarce resources.

    i have many of these Aluminium-legged stoves but never seen a leg with evidence of melting. Aluminium has very high thermal conductivity and if the legs are in their intended position, should never get hot enough to melt. I would suspect that someone might had placed a leg directly in the flame of an operating stove to get this effect.

    Just My opinion.
    Best Regards,
    Kerophile.
     
  5. Robert Radcliffe

    Robert Radcliffe United Kingdom Subscriber

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    OK @presscall and @kerophile you've convinced me, I've seen aluminium melt in conductivity tests I've carried out (I'm a science lecturer) but you're correct the aluminium was directly in the flame. In the correct place away from direct flames I guess it should be fine. Which is good news. Makes you wonder what must have been going on in one post I read where all three legs had melted.
     
  6. Robert Radcliffe

    Robert Radcliffe United Kingdom Subscriber

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  7. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    "My stove legs are melting", Tom said, softly.
     
  8. IvanN

    IvanN United States Subscriber

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    Very Punny:lol: