M2A

Discussion in 'Military' started by idahostoveguy, Sep 13, 2009.

  1. idahostoveguy

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    A little more information on the Safety Device and pressure release:

    I was reading through the documentation and found that this M2A actually has the Safety Device. (Hopefully, I have the metric conversions right, please correct if wrong.) To test for a safety device, there is a copper tube that comes out from the burner to the pressure gauge shown on the front. Behind the gauge is a pressure release valve that is released when the pressure reaches 60 PSI(4.22 Kg/cm2). Once released, the pressure is lowered to 25 PSI(1.76 Kg/cm2), which is normal operating pressure.

    I tested this operation out with my air compressor and filled the tank to 60 PSI. Immediately, the pressure released and fell back to 25 PSI, with a slight hissing and buzzing sound, like the documentation said it is supposed to do. It took around 30 seconds to complete the release.

    Still, 60 PSI (4.22 Kg/cm2), seems like a lot of pressure to build up to before the release, but then I suppose my SVEA 123 filler cap has something in the 40 PSI(2.81 Kg/cm2) range? Seems like I read that somewhere... Anyway, the danger zone on the gauge starts with 35 PSI (2.46 Kg/cm2)...

    Still haven't found a willing volunteer to come and wake the sleeping giant...
     
  2. idahostoveguy

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    I finally got the nerve up to light the M2A after seeing a post of one in operation:

    First a few precautions:

    I had the K-9/Police unit on stand-by...

    1253950392-m2a-burn-1.jpg

    Then the fire department....

    1253950433-m2a-burn-2.jpg

    Started up the pre-heat, by pre-heating it. Pre-heat stage was about 5 minutes...

    1253950455-m2a-burn-3.jpg

    1253950517-m2a-burn-4.jpg

    Lighting the main burner with air intake vent closed produces a yellow flame.

    1253950544-m2a-burn-5.jpg

    Opening the vent, produces a blue flame...

    1253950603-m2a-burn-6.jpg 1253950615-m2a-burn-7.jpg

    Whew! Glad that's over. After shutting the system down, I checked my pulse and found that it was back to normal after about 30 minutes. K-9 unit was dimissed and fire department returned to the station...
     
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  3. lanevitt

    lanevitt Subscriber

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    Are you sure its not part of a space shuttle ??

    I would like to see a Trangia 27 kettle balanced on it..
     
  4. idahostoveguy

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    I think it is one of the pieces that fell off in a prior launch! :) ;)
     
  5. Bob M

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    I read an article about these once. They stopped using them because the cooks would walk away from them while they were running and something would go "amuck". I guess they were responsible for burning down many a mess tent.
     
  6. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith Subscriber

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    What are the dimensions of the stove?

    I'm guessing about 24" long, 18" wide and about 12" tall. Anywhere near..?
     
  7. idahostoveguy

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    Ok, I just did a measurement of mine. Here it is for the SRG record books:

    24" long
    19.5" wide
    9.5" tall

    Hope this helps!

    sam
     
  8. Knight84

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    What is the weight of this tank ... I am stove.

    Cheers,
    Jeff
     
  9. idahostoveguy

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    Well, when I weighed it empty the scale said 42 pounds. I put 2 gallons of fuel into it. With fuel weighing approximately 8 pounds per gallon, that would bump it up to around 58 pounds. So, yes, I need wheels on this thing, but I'm able to heft it around, but just barely.

    sam
     
  10. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith Subscriber

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    SMP is State Machine Products - a euphemism for the Kentucky State Prison System. Your stove was assembled by the, er, guests...

    Wyott also made these stoves so I'm presuming they were built to military specification by a number of manufacturers. That parallels the M1950 MilSpec stoves which were also made by several manufacturers including SMP and Wyott. Other manufacturers of that stove were Coleman, Fiesta and Bialaddin (Willis & Bates, Halifax, UK) plus a couple of others whose names escape me. I don't know if any of those also made the M2A.
     
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  11. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith Subscriber

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    Filling the fuel tank is positively not the problem with these stoves - observe the usual precautions and you'll be OK.

    You will, however, have a problem if you're American and expect it to take 30 seconds to prime. In fact, it will take about 30 MINUTES to prime this stove. Yes, honestly, THIRTY MINUTES!! - I kid ye not!! - impatient and/or ignorant people have died attempting to light these stoves - really... :doh: :cry: :-&

    OK, it has a stove in it's own right to pre-heat the generator and burner. However this is positioned at the fuel tank end of a generator about 18 inches long and around 2 inches in diameter. You will find that after 5 minutes pre-heating you have managed to preheat about half the length of the generator. Further pre-heating for however long you like will not increase that distance by one nanometre - trust me!

    Then, after the generator you haven't managed to pre-heat anywhere near sufficiently, there's a HUGE 6-armed cast iron burner that the pre-heater will never touch in a million years - again, trust me!

    So the only way to pre-heat the entire generator and burner is by what I call a 'strategic flare'. After pre-heating for 5-10 minutes, you have to open the valve by a tiny amount - the fuel initially vapourises but soon cools down in the far end of generator and burner and burns yellow. It will, however, slowly heat up the rest of the generator and eventually, the burner. As you reach 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 minutes, you can gently open the valve slowly and progressively until you achieve this condition:-

    1275946243-M2A_blue_flames.jpg
    HUZZAH!!

    Note that 2 arms (out of six) of the burner are dedicated to pre-heating the generator and maintaining it sufficiently hot to continue to vapourise the fuel. The thought of running this stove on anything less volatile than gasoline is absolutely mind-boggling!! :shock:

    OK, it's not exactly launching the space shuttle (i.e. rocket science) but 'T minus 30 minutes and counting' isn't too far off the mark...
     
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  12. 94Bravo

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    I was an US ARMY cook for several years. The M-2 burners are one of the better inventions. The M59 did not precede it, it was the field oven/range that the M-2 fit in to do anything from boiling to baking. I have seen one "blow up" The safety valve flew off and went through 2 thick canvas sidings. Canvas like Army tents. The burner lost pressure and went out. I wonder where I can get one. Thanks. 94B Pete
     
  13. hikin_jim

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    No, problem, Sam, the wife and I will be right up to help you out. ;)

    Actually, though, if we do have that inter-regional stove meet in Oregon that we've been talking about...

    Very cool stove. That oughta keep the Boy Scouts in beans and franks for a while. Thanks for posting it.

    HJ
     
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  14. idahostoveguy

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    HJ, if I can extricate myself from work, I might think about going to the Oregon meet. It would be fun.

    Now, I just want to relate this old topic to the old M2A light show topic since they are one and the same stove. The light show is the M2A lit up at full brilliance. Most of you have seen the topic before.

    Here it is: M2A Light Show

    sam
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  15. idahostoveguy

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    So here is a link to the complete instruction manual. It's a PDF document that 1.7 MB and 170 or so pages.

    TM-10-7360-204-13 and P (M2A and similar technical manual)

    As I was reading through this I found out a few more interesting things about this stove and variants. This one comes with a pre-heater shield that aids in the heating of the generator. That should decrease the pre-heat time since the heat is focused and directed over the generator rather than dispersed into the atmosphere.


    1298267241-m2a_003.jpg
    Pre-heater shield is stored underneath the stove.


    1298267265-m2a_004.jpg
    Here's the stove without the pre-heater shield.



    1298267285-m2a_006.jpg
    Here is the pre-heater installed.


    sam
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 1, 2015
  16. SOLDIERBLUE

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    :thumbup: HI I USED THE M59 WHILST ON UN SERVICE IN THE LEBANON,FOUND IT TO BE MOST SATISFACTORY FOR FIELD COOKING BUT LIKE EVERY THING ELSE ,DANGEROUS IF YOU USED IT THE WRONG WAY,I COOKED ALL KINDS OF FOOD ON IT AND VERY SELDOM GOT A COMPLIANT,BEST REGARDS EX BATTALLION COOK SGT JIM GAVIN IRISH ARMY VET
     
  17. Doc Mark

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    HI, SoldierBlue,

    Welcome to CCS, Lad!! My wife and I have enjoyed the time we've spent in Ireland, and found the land and the people to be outstanding!

    You've come to the right place, if you love stoves, but one favor, please: don't use capital letters for all your typing. Most folks consider that to be "shouting", which upsets some. Thanks, very much for your understanding, and I look forward to reading whatever posts you wish to share with us. Any photos of you cooking in Lebanon? That would be great to see! Take care, and God Bless!

    Every Good Wish,
    Doc (who didn't drink beer until he was 50, and whose first beer was a nice pint of Guinness, in Ireland!!! It's spoiled for life, I am, and loving it!!) ;) 8) :thumbup: :D :D
     
  18. judge10tpt

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    we Still use these burners with great success in the NZ Army

    they are perhaps one of the most used peices of field catering equipment that we use

    Jason
     
  19. wallew

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    There is a reason the US military got rid of that particular unit. They had a tendency to blow up.

    Plus to actually USE THEM, you must light them outside the MKT, then take them up and put them in place WHILE THEY ARE LIT. That was the biggest problem.

    The replacement, the MBU V3 uses diesel and is a much better design. You can fill it and then light it without removing it from it's cradle. BIG IMPROVEMENT.

    These MBU's are used (at least they used to be used) in MKT's (Mobile Kitchen Trailer). There are several iterations.

    I'm a member of the MVCC - Military Vehicle Collectors of Colorado - and we use an MKT-90 for large club events.
     
  20. Wim

    Wim Subscriber

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    Hi Wallew, welcom on board! If you have any photo's of your field kitchen, feel free to post them as we like to see stoves-in-action O:) ! (Oh, and quite a few of us also like to see photo's of any old vehicles... :whistle: ;) )

    Regards,

    Wim