Stoves In Use-The Cooking Thread

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by Cookie, Dec 8, 2019.

  1. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr SotM Winner Subscriber

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    I recall having something similar called Sopapillas in 'Mexican' restaurants in the southwest.
     
  2. ArchMc

    ArchMc Subscriber

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    Sopapillas are actually New Mexico cuisine... and I would love to find a place that makes them closer to me.

    ....Arch
     
  3. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr SotM Winner Subscriber

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    I stopped at a place in NM last year, got enough to have extras ....
    They do not keep well. They were much better fresh.
     
  4. ArchMc

    ArchMc Subscriber

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    I love to get one piping hot, bite a corner off, drizzle some honey inside, give it a minute to properly infuse, and then eat. Heaven on Earth.

    ....Arch
     
  5. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr SotM Winner Subscriber

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    Yeah ...
     
  6. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    Coleman 413 on duty making chili dogs and coffee while on a shooting trip.

    IMG_20201017_123801.jpg

    Got the rifle sighted in, objective for the day achieved.

    Amusing happenstance while we were out there. A pickup truck was behind us on our trip up the hill and through the woods, and pulled up at the clearing with the berm with us. We exchanged pleasantries and all of us set up to shoot. They were sighting in a rifle as well, and they were both safe, and quite a pleasure to shoot with. Turned out he's a neighbor! We hadn't spoken, but were on nodding/waving acquaintance. We drove 1.5 hours and 8 miles off of pavement, to meet someone who lives 3 houses down.
     
  7. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    And the rifle...?
     
  8. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    Not of the type popular here. You can see one of the mags on the table to the left of the stove.
     
  9. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr SotM Winner Subscriber

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  10. esphojo

    esphojo Subscriber

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    20201019_194824.jpg When using one of my "three-legged-brassies" I pretty often don't fold out the legs. Any reason, besides stability, why I should unfold them? As I understand they were fixed, and smaller, from the begining (?) Guess my philosophy when cooking outdoor is lower is better....
     
  11. Duck

    Duck United States Subscriber

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    I don’t mind that type of rifle. I wouldn’t own one but that’s just my taste in style. You getting ready for a hunting trip?

    edit: I shouldn’t have said “wouldn’t “. You never know but I’m more of the classic wood stock type of guy.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2020
  12. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    No hunting trip here. I've no issue at all with hunting, as long as it's done humanely.

    I'm just lazy, and have been blessed with the absolutely FANTASTIC good fortune to live in a time and place where the grocery store always has meat. In the course of human history across the world, this is just............a stupendously easy way to live, and it seems a shame not to take advantage of it. :mrgreen:
     
  13. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    No. But the stability is of the greatest importance; hence the legs are three.

    I don't think lower is better in this instance, because the legs also create a greater base spread, which seems to me is the same thing as 'lower', center-of-gravity wise.
     
  14. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    My own personal interest in firearms is aesthetic as well as utilitarian, a concept familiar to any lover of classic camp stoves. So, especially with rifles and shotguns, the wood is important. I'm not interested in synthetic-stock rifles and don't own any of any type.

    If I hunted a lot, I can see the advantage of a synthetic stock, especially in a medium-price hunting rifle. Just not my thing, though.
     
  15. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    I'm starting to appreciate the aesthetics as well. I used to be after pure functionality, and a synthetic stock that requires zero maintenance(remember, lazy too) was exactly right for me. I have an SKS that someone put a synthetic stock on and converted to use AK mags. I'll be converting it back to the standard fixed mag and finding a wooden stock for it.

    Perhaps I'm growing up.
     
  16. Cookie

    Cookie United States Subscriber

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    @esphojo I want a Manaslu to add to my collection. Thanks for sharing
     
  17. Haggis

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    I own hunting rifles,,, nothing other than the “classical” bolt/lever action sort,,, I like the wood and bluing... My opinion is huge clips/magazines and plaztik stocks have all the beauty of a concrete boat anchor,,, everyone has an opinion...

    I still shoot deer, bear, and the odd grouse. No defense for it,,, I was raised in a subsistence hunting family, and though I don’t need to shoot animals, I still do,,, in a self restrictive way. Same with fishing,,, when I catch enough for a meal, I quit and go home. When I shoot enough grouse for a meal, I’m done. No sport in it for me,,, shooting something for sport that dies in earnest,,, heavy vibes in killing a thing,,, “taking all it has” from it... Everyone kills to live though, or has someone do the killing for them... I didn’t make the rules, but I live by them.

    Still trap beaver and snare rabbits too, in season... Keeps me busy and helps feed me in winter...
     
  18. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    I was raised a bird hunter from boyhood. My dad and granddad were pheasant hunters and occasional waterfowl hunters. Neither were deer or other 'big game' hunters. So, as such things often run in families, I never hunted deer, and still haven't more than a couple (unsuccessful) times.

    In my twenties and into my 40s I was heavily involved in duck and goose hunting. By then, my dad was able to buy fine shotguns and I'd often use his. He was a Beretta and Browning over-and-under 20 gauge guy mostly. I became a fanatic XC skier at 40, and this has cut into my bird hunting for a long time; though my brothers remain very active.

    I never owned a handgun or a rifle until my early 50s, though I'd owned lots of shotguns of all action types. I was familiar with rifle and handgun handling and shooting to a degree over the years. My dad had a few revolvers and a couple of very high quality Finnish rifles at the time of his death. So I took a revolver when we divvied up and got interested. It led me to Cowboy Action Shooting for awhile, and an interest particularly in revolvers and lever-action rifles.

    And so I took it from there and the more traditional the things the better. I'm a frequent target shooter, but not on a competitive level, except against myself and friends.
     
  19. Hazet

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    Cooking set-up is a circa 1998 Trangia 25-5 with an Optimus Nova (Swedish made) / Trangia adapter cup / BernieDawg Dawg-A-Nova silent burner / white gas.
    Stuff being cooked is Udon noodles (dried, not the pre-cooked vacuum packed type), a slight variation of Yaki Udon sauce (home-made), King Oyster mushrooms cooked in a butter & oil mix, with some garlic and carrots sauteed until they were soft. Green onion added at the end.
    Cooked this at a VW car show a couple days ago.

    IMG_7011.JPG thumbnail (2).jpg thumbnail (1).jpg
     
  20. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    Now that looks good....