Trangia 25+27 capacity question for field use

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by ArcticStoves, Dec 4, 2019.

  1. ArcticStoves

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    All: Much obliged to Cookie for doing what I can't do---we don't have anybody with Trangia in town...anyways, it looks like the Trangia 25 1.75 Litre pot is the size to go with!

    Let us know, Cookie how the boil in the bag entrés taste! The much smaller Canadian consumer market has virtually no such entrés, Tasty Bite being the sole exception.
     
  2. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    I buy a lot of Tasty Bite Channa Masala packs in the course of a year; I like them a lot.

    But on the trail, I'm a steak and wine, sausage and eggs guy!
     
  3. Cookie

    Cookie United States Subscriber

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    These taste fine but I don't like to carry the weight. If I'm gonna carry the weight then I'll cook some steak and potatoes on the trail. My wife is spoiled on my trangia meals lol. The nova burner makes it easy. I love my Duossal set with the GSI kettle.

    20181020_083211.jpg
     
  4. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    With my one- to two-night backpacking program, the steaks are an easy carry!
     
  5. ArcticStoves

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    Goodness! Elaborate cooking facilities! I usually just put the alcohol storm cooker, or MSR Whisperlite, on a foil and foam pad on the ground or on the snow...

    Cookie's excellent cook table with Duossal Trangia 25 makes me ask another question, Hard Anodized, versus Duossal?

    I know much has been written about this.

    However, in my case, for meals on the ground in the shade of trees, wearing earth-tone colours, sometimes (near a Bald Eagle's nest) in shade under scrim netting, the dull colour of the HA has some appeal. However, here, HA is considerably more costly than Duossal.

    As well, the current Duossal Trangia 25 sets are around 1kg in weight, same set in Hard Anodized is 850 grammes, so very close in weight....
     
  6. Cookie

    Cookie United States Subscriber

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    @ArcticStoves I absolutely love my Duossal set. I don't mind HA at all but prefer stainless when it's an option. Yes it's heavier but for real meals I like the heat distribution of stainless. I have yet to burn a single meal using either the alcohol or nova burners.
     
  7. snwcmpr

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    If your meals are boil in the bag, stainless steel as a cooking surface would not be an advantage.
    I too love the duossal with spirit or Nova.
     
  8. Cookie

    Cookie United States Subscriber

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    snwcmpr has a good point. If you were the type of person who doesn't cook home style meals then the duossal would offer no advantage in cooking your meals.
     
  9. Ed Winskill

    Ed Winskill United States Subscriber

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    Something about 'boil in a bag' that fails to engage my enthusiasm.....
     
  10. IvanN

    IvanN United States Subscriber

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    I don't always pack this way , but one advantage of packing steaks and whole foods is that your pack gets noticeably lighter day by day. It is also a real morale booster to have a real meal on your trip. Especially a couple days in.
     
  11. Simes

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    Another alternative is make your own BiB meals with a cheap vacuum packer. You can make endless stews, curries etc etc, freeze them then pack them.

    For UK residents Lidl still have their Ambiano packers available in a few stores. Great for bulk buying and freezing meat portions.
     
  12. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    That's a great option. Not a retort package so shelf stable without refrigeration, but when camping below freezing that's no trouble.
     
  13. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr Subscriber

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    Vacuum sealing wet meals is a learned skill.
     
  14. Marc

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    Freeze them first?
     
  15. snwcmpr

    snwcmpr Subscriber

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    It is years since I tried wet foods. Freezing is one way. I think a paper towel at the top is another. Some sealers have settings.
     
  16. ArcticStoves

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    All: Dog mushers here in the Yukon do home-made-frozen-then-boiled-in-the-bag meals including frozen fruit juices. Sadly, as today's weather indicates, we are no longer at -15C or colder for extended periods, so I have to stick with shelf-stable entrés. No more 'outside freezer' in the winter time---a picnic cooler set in the deep snow beside the back door. Also, I have to try and reduce the plastic waste as much as I can, though this has to be balanced against the lack of dishes with boil-in-the-bag entrés, just have to boil the spoons----very long-handled spoons, as we eat them out of the bags!

    Now, I have discovered that the Trangia Non-Stick pots are also less brightly reflective than regular 'ultralight' pots, how long does the non-stick last? Particularly on the outside of the pots!
     
  17. Marc

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  18. Lennart F Sweden

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    The outside of the new Trangia non-stick is Hammerite style and seem to be very durable - the non-stick inside is durable too but one of the used fry pans I've bought has some scratches, seemingly from knives.
    And I love the milled bottom of many new Trangia non-stick pans when using them on other stoves - I guess it helps heat conductivity too.
     
  19. ArcticStoves

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    All: Thanks for all of your research and views!

    I had a quick look on-line, and Campbells, the maker of the Ready retort pouch meals does not show a retailer here in the Yukon. Sigh. No big surprise there!

    I have decided to go the Trangia 25 route, my next issue is whether I can get one used Non-stick from the Bay of Evil, or new Duossal from MEC.ca, or Hard Anodized from Canadian Outdoor Equipment.

    I'm in luck, I have a gift certificate for MEC. The MEC Trangia 25 is Duossal, all they carry now, and a good deal.

    I can get the Hard Anodized (HA) Trangia 25, but it is more costly.

    I do see the odd No Stick 25 come up on the Bay of Evil. So, I have some pondering to do.

    Most of our wildlife observation blinds are natural affairs, underneath an evergreen tree, behind a fallen tree, etc, so the shine of the Duossal is not that critical.

    Sweetie and I did a boil in the bag meal on a very grey, not so shiny Meta-50, and 3 Otter swam right by us, this past fall. It was a post-snorkelling in-dry-suits-Tasty Bite and Long Spoons warm-up-meal. Stove was largely hidden by the low grass.

    My gear does get stuffed into rucksacks, bike bags, sleds. Even my Evernew Ti solo pot has a slight dent in it, seems to come with the territory.

    Is HA or Non-stick or Duossal any more dent-resistant?

    Does the outside of the Duossal grey out with age like the Meta-50?

    I'd like to avoid spray-painting the outside of pots or the windscreen, as I don't like the idea of the solvants in the paint ending up in the food, or even in the emissions from the meths!

    Hm....
     
  20. Lennart F Sweden

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    The last decades of Trangia products seem to be less likely to lose their shiny finish so your choice of a camo Trangia 25 would be HA as it is the only non glossy windshield today.
    While Trangia is less focused on light weight than Meta it is still primarily light and then strong so the hard case now offered is the only way to prevent dents if it is tossed around.
    If you consider buying a used non-stick, try to get detailed pictures of inside of every pot to see it's not burned and scratched - or pay a very low price so you can buy new pots without paying more than a new complete cooker.