Trangia 25+27 capacity question for field use

Discussion in 'Stove Forum' started by ArcticStoves, Dec 4, 2019.

  1. Marc

    Marc Subscriber

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    I may have been caught up too, hence OMC's comment.

    If Enmanskök is the M40/M44, my comment and preference stands.

    If the Enmanskök is like OMC's Primus 71, I can't comment as I've no experience with the 71 and would of course defer to those who do have experience.
     
  2. Lennart F Sweden

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    The tins of the swedish mess kit are packed together approximately 110X160mm oval and155mm tall - packed in the windshield it adds about 5mm all way around and 10mm in heigth, this would indicate the windshield effekt on packing size of every "german clone" mess kit as I assume that hungarian would be(1990's or later) - bail goes outside windshield and adds some packing size.
     
  3. ArcticStoves

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    All: Much thanks all! I have decided not to go the M40-M44 Snuskburken Swedish army storm cooker route, as there are not enough complete sets around to be affordable---postage being an issue as well. 5 years ago I might have been able to do Snuskburken, but not now...much of what is on the web is of dubious quality, mixture of Swedish windscreens, pots from somewhere well east of there.....

    So, I am down to the Trangia 25-HA, versus Trangia 25 Duossal (with non-stick frypan lid) , both would be new from the Canadian Outdoor Equipment, or from MEC.ca by mail.

    For the record, the Duossal is cheaper here (!!), but the HA is lighter and has the non-reflective windscreens so we don't spook the wildlife...

    Can't seem to get the T-25 HA delivered here from the mail order place named that river in South America...
     
  4. ArcticStoves

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    Some news all...thanks for everybody's help here!

    I was able to use gift cards from within my family for that store named after a river in South America, which finally re-stocked the Trangia 25-3, Hard Anodized pots and windscreen, lid is a teflon fry pan, so I was able to order one tonight. It will be in the post for a bit, but I will certainly share photos of a boil in the bag dinner out on the land this winter in the stoves in action gallery!

    Thanks again to all who pondered the many options, T-25 versus T-27, Duossal versus Hard Anodized, and even found similarly-sized boil-in-the-bag meals to try out in a Trangia 25! Much thanks to all!
     
  5. ArcticStoves

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    Trangia 25 HA arrived in the post, so stay tuned, as I will get it out to melt some snow for a boil in the bag lunch! We've a Storm Warning from both the Canadian and US weather offices, for the next 3 days, so it may take a while to snowshoe pack the bike trails before I can get out for a field lunch!!!

    I am spoiled by the Evernew Ti Trangia-burner clones, I picked up the Trangia burner pulling it out of the T-25 box and felt that it has a substantial heft to it!
     
  6. Cookie

    Cookie United States Subscriber

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    Oh that burner ain't lightweight but it'll last you a long time. Can't wait to get a trip report. Stay safe and enjoy
     
  7. snwcmpr

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  8. Lennart F Sweden

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    Looks nice - I have the pans in that version, light and seem durable, I have just used them on some different gas and kero stoves yet.
     
  9. ArcticStoves

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    Laundry and many other chores to do this weekend, but I have unboxed the T-25HA, and, low and behold (!) it does fit 2 of the boil in the bag entrés in the larger pot! Details to follow! I will try and do some comparison photos with the Meta-50, have to see how to integrate carbon felt insulation and primer wick system from Meta-50 over to T-25HA. Black T-25 is interesting! I had seen one in early Feb. for sale via Japan, but was deterred by the 'T-35' number, wasn't sure what it meant!
     
  10. ArcticStoves

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    P1017110.JPG
    Hi all: At home with a cold, but have been able to take a few minutes after lunch to use stainless steel wire to attach existing Meta-50 burner-cup sized carbon felt pieces into a friction-fit priming cup for the Evernew Ti burner so it will fit into the Trangia-25HA.

    P1017112.JPG
    I was startled to see that the T-25HA is slightly shorter than the Meta-50,
    but has more fluid volume---the T25 will fit 2 boil in the bag entrés!
    P1017128.JPG
    Essentially you have to drop the burner into the T25 windscreen, then slip on the carbon felt priming cup from below. Aluminum tuna can snuffer cup to the right.

    Hm, filling and lighting will be interesting!

    P1017129.JPG
    P1017130.JPG
    I was able to cut and re-use the Meta-50 carbon felt windscreen, for interior windscreen insulation, and a shortened exterior windscreen---the latter is held on with an office paperclip.

    P1017134.JPG
    View attachment 231540
    Not shown is the insulated stove base, a sheet of re-used aluminum deli-tray foil, taped to thin insulation foam.


    The total system looks something like this:
    P1017138.JPG

    I am mindful of not condensing exhaust smoke and having it drip back into either of the 2 pots, so that is why the carbon felt windscreen only covers the top of the stove windscreen.
    P1017143.JPG

    There is no fuel bottle in the packed stove bag, as I’m aware of a long history of stoves being eaten out in storage by leaky fuel bottles.

    As well, in a subarctic environment, the extended-neck butane lighter must be carried on a lanyard inside a clothing layer, as the butane mix does not work well below roughly +10C. Similarly, I copy the Swedish practice of keeping the fuel warm until immediate use by keeping it in a pocket inside my clothing system.


    By good luck the T25 and the boil in the bag entrés, Vasabrot crackers, bandana-napkins, 2 nesting extra-long Ti spoons (for eating directly out of the boil in the bag pouch!), +hot chocolate powder, fits in a 15L sil-nylon roll-top stuff sack.

    P1017149.JPG



    Once I get over this cold, I hope to post photos of my first T-25 stove trial!

    Stay tuned!
     
  11. William Ritchie

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    Looks like there is a little room left over . I would have to say a Bakepacker element may speed things up . Bought commercially or DIY it would cut down the boil / steam time I believe . DIY the unit could be tailored to the depth needed Just my $ .02 worth . a very efficient steaming system . Have seen DIY on this site . Rather than tubing there is honeycomb aluminum available at McMaster Carr . WR
     
  12. ArcticStoves

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    Hm, yes. Interesting. I have no experience with bakepacker elements, but the first task of any stove here, is to melt snow to make water.

    I am also working on a separate ultra-light multi-burner alcohol stove to do just that, 6L of compressed snow at a time, to do a day's worth of water for bike camping---but that is a separate project!
     
  13. snwcmpr

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    Basically the BakePacker is a standoff that raises the item cooked to be above the level of the small amount of water in the pot. Thus the item cooked is in steam rather than boiling water. Much higher temp.

    I used the original and later used 3 rocks found at camp, to set a round piece of aluminum to set the silicone muffin cup on for 'baking' with steam. I used a lot less fuel, and simmering kept the small amount of water steaming.

    It might be worth trying to heat your food that way.

    Ken
     
  14. William Ritchie

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    The other thought would be to set the pot for melting snow on top of the element suspended above the burner to have it act as a heat diffuser / exchanger for the bottom of the pot , if there is room .Sort of a double duty device . Just saying . Wr
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2020
  15. ArcticStoves

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    Hm...this bears some thought.

    A lot of what winter stoves are used for here, is to change snow into liquid water---below boiling point.

    We're struggling to get the snow-water mix to +5C.

    Often fill water containers, set them upside down in the snow so they won't freeze overnight, as the snow is a good insulator and is usually warmer than the air. Or only do the snow-melt in the morning.

    Only after filling the water bottles/camelbak, do I try and get a smaller amount of melted snow water up to be at least warm enough to heat up the boil in the bag meal entrés.

    Why melt snow? Getting to open water sources is risky and energy-intensive, the open water you see in my profile photo is only there because of the fluctuating water levels made by the Whitehorse power dam. With climate change, even expert elders are reluctant to approach open water in creeks, as judging ice thickness is very difficult. Typically, wildlife is already drinking from these rare open water spots, which can include Grizzly Bears.

    Hence snow melting. I'm not sure I ever get to steam, but I'll see if I can!
     
  16. ArchMc

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    Good suggestions about snow melting, but they won't work for everyone. When you're climbing, you usually want to start early in the morning, before the sun has a chance to melt the ice above you. The melting can have all kinds of unpleasant consequences, from swelling streams to increased rockfall. So you generally melt your water in the evening, consume as much of it as you can (as dehydration is a common problem), and keep your next day's water supply from re-freezing (generally by keeping it in your sleeping bag.

    Apologies -- this is a bit of a departure from the overall direction of the thread.

    ....Arch
     
  17. ArcticStoves

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    Thanks to all for their excellent observations, I must try steaming!
    Meanwhile, town is pretty well empty, we've all been sent home from work, I was already there with the sniffles-cough which persists, Dr. says, by telephone that I do Not Likely Have the Bug of the Century.

    So, lots of lying around doing web research, reading books...hence my question:

    Why are the excellent Trangia precise pouring fuel bottles, with the spring-loaded press down valve, no longer sold in Canada?

    Even the Trangia.se site says this.

    I am guessing that the bottle, which is only labeled in Swedish and English, and does not have a French user instruction-safety label, may be at fault. I could write Trangia.se, as they are very helpful, but I thought I'd try CCS first!
     
  18. snwcmpr

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    Some places in the US changed the requirements for the Trangia bottle writing to NOT include gasoline. It was said to be unsafe for use around children. (Child protection Act ???) That may be related to the problem you are having. But, maybe not.
     
  19. ArchMc

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    I think it's part of the 'Blame Canada' movement.

    ....Arch
     
  20. Ed Winskill

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    Yeah, it's time those guys take some of the blame!